Month: September 2014

How An Octogenarian Preserved An Endangered Native American Language

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by Jordan Kushins

It’s easy to take translations for granted when Google can swap between Albanian and Zulu with the click of a button, but even that tech has real world limitations. Marie Wilcox is the last fluent speaker of Wukchumni, one of 130 different endangered Native American languages in the United States that don’t have any kind of digital—or analog—legacy.

Over the course of seven years in California’s San Joaquin Valley, she worked with her daughter and grandson to catalog everything she knows about the language. First, she hand-scrawled memories on scraps of paper; then, she hunt-and-pecked on an old keyboard to complete a dictionary and type out legends like “How We Got Our Hands.” Next, she recorded the whole thing on audio for pronunciation—it’s very specific!—and posterity.

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CFP – English Practice, due January 30, 2015

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Call for Articles 2015

English Practice, the journal of the BC Teachers of English Language Arts, is a peer-reviewed, open access, online publication published twice annually.

Submission Criteria and Guidelines: 

We accept submissions under the following categories:

  • Teaching Ideas (classroom lessons and strategies)
  • Investigating our Practice (teacher inquiry)
  • Salon (Literary & arts-based pieces)
  • Check this Out (book reviews)

Please see our Submission Guidelines below for details about the different categories, criteria and guidelines.

We invite you to submit articles for our upcoming issue:

Starting a Circle: Exploring Aboriginal Education.

This issue is devoted to exploring the vital importance as well as challenges of integrating Aboriginal perspectives, voices, texts, curricula and teaching and learning practices within English Language Arts. We invite educators and scholars from British Columbia and beyond to explore how the First Peoples Principles of Learning are taken up in classroom practices as well as significant issues arising from landmark events and curricular shifts in BC, which reflect larger questions related to the future of Aboriginal Education and English Language Arts.

Topics may include:

  • Reconciliation: What does reconciliation mean in our classrooms? How can we support students in finding their role within reconciliation? What legacies of residential schools remain in BC schools and beyond, and how can we as Aboriginal and non- Aboriginal educators address these in our practices?
  • Aboriginal Content: How do we increase our ability to integrate Aboriginal content throughout our educational practice? How do we work proactively as a professional community towards these ends?
  • Engagment and Inclusion: What approaches support engagement, inclusion, powerful outcomes and greater success for Aboriginal learners in English Language Arts? What practices support increased Aboriginal graduation outcomes?
  • English First Peoples 10-12: How do we meaningfully and ethically integrate First Peoples’ texts and curriculum into our practices? What barriers and tensions exist and how do we address these?
  • First Peoples Principles of Learning: How do we use these in our classrooms to improve learning for all students? How can they guide our course planning and selection/evaluation of classroom resources?

Closing date: January 30, 2015

Contact: Pamela Richardson pamela.richardson@ubc.ca, or Sara Davidsonsarafdavidson@gmail.com

 Criteria for English Practice

English Practice provides you with the opportunity to write and be read. Your viewpoints, lessons, opinions, research (formal or informal) are welcomed in formats ranging from strategies, lesson plans and units, to more formal compositions and narratives exploring big ideas in teaching and learning, to creative writing.

English Practice publishes contributions on all facets of language arts learning, teaching and research, focusing on the intermediate, middle and secondary grades. The journal offers teachers of a practical, user-friendly guide to research-based practices.

We have four sections with the following guidelines to assist you in preparing and submitting your writing:


Teaching Ideas (teaching strategies, lesson plans, unit plans)
Articles should
:

  • have a clear purpose (i.e. articulate specific learning goals for students)
  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role (i.e. grade 6 teacher; have used reading workshops for 10 years; trying to embed more targeted strategy instruction in my teaching)
  • provide a description of instruction that outlines how modeling or scaffolding is used
  • offer specific classroom practices that are grounded in research (backed up with current thinking, research reference(s))
  • be well organized and clear
  • ensure that any student samples, graphic organizers, and/or handouts are readable and reproducible
  • ensure that formative and summative assessment are aligned with instruction
  • include information on any student and/or professional resources that may be useful for readers
  • include a summary and/or reflection

  Investigating Our Practice (action research, reflection on practice over time, narrative)

Articles should:

  • introduce and outline the purpose and process of inquiry
  • explore a big idea in teaching and learning over time
  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role in relation to issues, big ideas, and/or inquiry question(s) (i.e. “I believe in democratic schooling, but I hadn’t recently looked at how what I do was or was not working”; “I have been teaching for 18 years and oral language has always been important to me. However, I want to know how I can help my students actually improve their speaking and listening abilities.”)
  • include reflections made before and after the teaching practice
  • typically be narrative in style
  • relate your own thinking and practice to current thinking and research
  • be well organized and clear
  • include synthesis and/or next steps
  • include a list of references in APA format


Salon (literary and arts-based explorations, or opinion pieces)
Pieces should
:

  • be related to teaching and learning, curriculum theory and philosophy, language and literacy, or English language arts
  • use form effectively
  • be engagingly written (first person, present tense, ideas are effectively linked and language choice heightens meaning)
  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role, especially in opinion pieces


Check This Out (includes reviews, announcements of contests and conferences)
Articles should

  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role (i.e. teach grades 9-12 English; looking for novels related to the theme of…; “I am always looking for new ideas related to diversity in the classroom”)
  • have clearly explained and supported ideas and/or opinions
  • Book, website, or other resource reviews should include a target audience and some ideas for application in the classroom.
  • Authors must not have a personal or a financial stake in what is being announced or reviewed.

CFP – The International Journal of Holistic Early Learning and Development

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A new, online, open access journal on holistic early learning and development will be the first and only online, open access journal on early learning in Canada, and one of just three worldwide.  It will also be the first online, open access early learning journal to incorporate both scholarly and non-scholarly contributions in multiple formats (research, reports, essays, reviews, photos, and poetry).
The first issue, to be published in January 2015, will be devoted to Aboriginal Ways of Knowing and Learning in Early Childhood. Attached is a call for contributions for the first and subsequent issues which also contains information about our upcoming International Spring Conference on Early Learning and Development (see:https://conferences.lakeheadu.ca/isceld/) which will be held at Lakehead University Orillia on May 1st and May 2nd, 2015.

For more information about the journal, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can also visit the journal site at ijheld.lakeheadu.ca.

 

Assistant, Associate or Professor – Educational Equity

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FACULTY POSITIONS IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH WITH A FOCUS ON EDUCATIONAL EQUITY
The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) invites applications from scholars who do qualitative research with a focus on educational equity, for one or more faculty positions at the rank of Assistant Professor of Education, Associate Professor of Education (untenured), or Professor of Education.
We seek candidates who have strong training in education or a social science discipline and who conduct qualitative research on educational equity and/or policies, programs, or practices designed to promote educational equity, from pre-K to postsecondary education. Scholars who focus on race/ethnicity, immigration, gender, and/or class, and who study the role of education in promoting or inhibiting social mobility are welcome. We are particularly interested in appointing new colleagues whose research is concerned with improving educational opportunities for disadvantaged populations either in the U.S. or in international contexts. Strong applicants will be distinguished by the quality of their research, their use of rigorous qualitative methods, and the salience of their work to policy and practice.  We also seek candidates who have the potential to make a powerful substantive contribution to our curriculum, particularly the teaching of qualitative methods. We especially encourage applications from women and minorities.
At HGSE, our mission is to conduct high-quality research on issues related to education, and to teach, advise, and mentor a diverse community of graduate students, both at the doctoral and master’s levels, in order to contribute to building the next generation of successful scholars, policy-makers, and practitioners in education. We therefore seek candidates with excellent pedagogical skills, including the ability to clearly communicate sophisticated research to heterogeneous audiences. Additionally, candidates should be prepared to engage in qualitative research with graduate students, many of whom are interested in policy, programs, or practice.
Candidates should have a doctorate in a relevant field, such as education, anthropology, history, political science, psychology, policy or sociology. Successful candidates will have an excellent record of rigorous scholarship and a commitment to teaching and mentoring. Candidates completing their doctoral studies will be considered if they will complete all requirements for the doctorate by the start of the 2015-16 academic year.
The search committee will begin reviewing applications on November 1, 2014 and continue until the position is filled. 
We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.
An American Educational Research Association List If you need assistance with this list, please send an email to listadmin@aera.net.

Federal Appeals Court To Hear Gitxaala Lawsuit To Stop Pipeline

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Vancouver, BC – September 26, 2014 — The Federal Court of Appeal has granted leave to Gitxaala Nation to apply for Judicial Review to challenge the approval of the Northern Gateway Pipelines Project. The Court’s decision on leave means the Court will hear and decide on the Gitxaala Nation’s lawsuit challenging Cabinet’s approval of the Enbridge Project.

Due to the number of lawsuits that have been filed, and the number of parties involved, it is unlikely that the Court will hear submissions for several months. In the meantime, several parties are expected to file evidence with the Court and seek direction as to how the lawsuits will proceed. It’s possible that the Court will decide to hear all the cases together. Read more…

Bison treaty signed by Alberta, Montana tribes

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1st treaty among tribes and First Nations in the area since the 1800s

By Matthew Brown, The Associated Press

Posted: Sep 23, 2014 7:53 PM MT – Last Updated: Sep 23, 2014 7:53 PM MT

Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.

Leaders of 11 tribes from Montana and Alberta signed the pact during a daylong ceremony on Montana’s Blackfeet Reservation, organizers said.

It marks the first treaty among the tribes and First Nations since a series of agreements governing hunting rights in the 1800s. That was when their ancestors still roamed the border region hunting bison, also called buffalo.

The long-term aim of Tuesday’s “Buffalo Treaty” is to allow the free flow of the animals across the international border and restore the bison’s central role in the food, spirituality and economies of many American Indian tribes and First Nations — a Canadian synonym for native tribes.

Such a sweeping vision could take many years to realize, particularly in the face of potential opposition from the livestock industry. Read More…

Amazon Women on the Frontlines of Climate Change

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

A selection of photos from Amazon Women on the Frontlines of Climate Change, a traveling photography exhibit with written and live testimonies from indigenous women leading solutions on the frontlines of the Amazon as the region confronts the impacts of climate change.

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As in other developing countries, women in the Amazon bear a disproportional burden as climate change impacts their traditional territories and environment. It is in the daily lives of these women – who are highly dependent on local natural resources for their livelihood – that the battle to save the family, traditional ways of life and the future of their children is played out. In order to further preserve biodiversity and limit its degradation, indigenous people – particularly women – can and should play a leading role in the global response to climate change. Amazonian women hold a wealth of knowledge and expertise that can be used in climate change mitigation, disaster reduction and adaptation strategies. These brave women are rising to become effective agents of change, and have taken the lead in a rapidly growing movement to protect their rainforest homelands across Ecuador. As female givers of life, the women of the Amazon have felt a great responsibility to lead the fight against impending oil drilling and the destruction of Pachamama, our “life giving mother earth,” and are calling on the world to keep oil under ground in their ancestral lands. Read More…

US to pay largest Native American nation $554 mn in landmark settlement

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Published time: September 25, 2014 15:55

​The Obama administration will pay the Navajo Nation a record $554 million to settle claims by the most populous Native American tribe that funds and natural resources on its reservation were mismanaged by the US government for decades.

The agreement will be formally signed on Friday at Window Rock, Arizona, the capital of the Navajo reservation, the largest in the US by land mass.

The accord was borne from litigation that accused the government of mishandling Navajo funds and natural resources on its more than 14 million acres across Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah, all held in trust for the tribe and leased out for purposes of farming, energy development, logging, and mining. The Navajo claims date back as far as 50 years. Read More…

Marshallese poet Receives Standing Ovation at UN Climate Leaders Summit

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Marshallese poet Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner speaks on behalf of civil society during the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Leaders Summit in New York City. Check out this high-quality version of Kathy’s poem with footage of climate action around the world.

Kathy performed a new poem entitled “Dear Matafele Peinem”, written to her daughter. The poem received a standing ovation. Kathy is also a teacher, journalist and founder of the environmental NGO, Jo-jikum.

The growing push by Canada’s First Nations for sovereignty

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The Atikamekw are the latest to declare sovereignty over their ancestral territory in a bid to control resources

LA TUQUE, Canada — For years, members of the Atikamekw First Nation have watched trucks rumble through their traditional territory, carrying out load after load of timber, only to see the profits slipped into others’ pockets. Recently, exploration companies have begun searching for rare metal and gold deposits on the land, a vast stretch of Canadian wilderness nearly the size of Maine. And like many First Nation tribes, the Atikamekw have had enough.

Atikamekw leaders declared sovereignty over the 31,000 square miles of boreal forest in north-central Quebec earlier this month in a bid to control the extraction of resources on their land. This week they issued another statement saying they won’t allow forestry work to continue on their ancestral land without their approval. The moves came after a game-changing Supreme Court decision this summer that recognized the rights of a First Nation in British Columbia to its ancestral territory. Now many tribes are examining if and how they can exert more control over the land they claim as theirs. Read More