Day: January 30, 2015

Registration now OPEN! 13th Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS) – Mar 7, 2015

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Saturday, March 7, 2015

7:45 am – 4:00 pm

Simon Fraser University Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings St,

Light Breakfast and Lunch Provided

No Registration Fee

RSVP: http://tinyurl.com/IGSS2015

IGSS 2015 Registration Poster

Concordia Panel Explores the Work of Aboriginal Artists in the Digital Sphere

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Concordia Panel Explores the Work of Aboriginal Artists in the Digital Sphere

  • Photo Brandon Johnston

Can the digital realm exist as decolonized space? This was one of the topics discussed at last Friday’s panel discussion “Aboriginal Territories in Digital Space” in the EV building’s auditorium.

Organized by the Aboriginal Arts Research Group, the Concordia-based student group focused the event on fostering a discussion on indigenous art and artists in Montreal.

Skawennati, an Aboriginal artist and Concordia graduate, spoke about her recent project Time Traveler™, an animated video series based on a Mohawk character named Hunter who lives in the distant future.

He acquires a pair of glasses that allow him to travel through time and interact with historic events. His adventures allow him to understand his people’s history, and throughout the series, he forms a positive self-identity, eventually falling in love and gaining success in the hyper-materialistic world of the future.

“I think that what we’re doing as artists is we’re trying to show connected history and recreate that history,” Skawennati said. “I think art has that potential to remind us of something and in this case, it’s reminding us of our connections to our past and our ancestors.”

The entire series was created on a computerized set designed in Second Life, an online virtual reality.

“I really think virtual worlds are kind of metaphors for the future and that’s why I thought it was the right medium to use for this story,” she continued.

Following Skawennati’s talk, Jason Lewis, Concordia Research Chair and associate professor of Computation Arts, discussed SKINS—a video game design workshop he helps coordinate for Kahnawake’s First Nations youth.

The workshop allows young people to design their own video games from the ground up, with the help of Lewis and others. They first discuss the story they want their game to tell, design characters and landscapes using paper and clay and eventually take the games to the digital stage with the help of the workshop coordinators. Read More