Month: November 2015

Why Native poets, and their languages, are so often misunderstood

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Why Native poets, and their languages, are so often misunderstood

by Corinne Segal  November 23, 2015 at 11:20 AM EST

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Poet Joan Naviyuk Kane. Photo by Brian Adams

Alaskan Native poet Joan Naviyuk Kane’s poems grow from one word.

In the case of the poem “Compass,” that word is “Uaałukitaaqtuq,” an Inupiaq word that describes the feeling of being “in a boat, and the waves are rocking you back and forth,” Kane said.

Kane writes in Inupiaq, one of the languages spoken by the Native Alaskan people. Many of her poems are inspired by the sound or feel of one word; then, she “build[s] the poem, either through sonic value or tone or emotional value, or intellectual resonances that come up through language,” she said. Kane, who lives in Anchorage, Alaska, often asks her mother, who taught her and her sons Inupiaq, to suggest certain words or phrases.

The act of writing in a Native language is one tool against the misconceptions that exist about Native people in the U.S. — those that do not account for the reality of diverse, thriving Native cultures, she said.

“There is something that is very troublesome to me about … playing into this continued exoticization or fetishization of the Native person as a relic of the past, as a romantic figure, as something outdated or very other,” she said. “Native people from very different parts of the United States are expected to have similarities because we happened to be colonized by the same government — there’s something problematic there.”

The work that Native artists produce speaks to the diversity of Native people in the U.S., she said. “In Alaska, we still call ourselves Eskimo people. We’re very different, culturally, linguistically, socially, geographically, than what people consider the American Indian population,” she said.

“Compass” began as an exploration of her mother’s relationship with her sons. But “it became instead, like many of my poems, a more terrifying psychological exploration of what it means to be a woman,” she said.

The poem outlines the speaker’s physical reality in short declarations, a linguistic pattern that which Kane said reflects her understanding of Inupiaq. Read more…

The Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address: Worth Reading Today, and Every Day

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The Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address: Worth Reading Today, and Every Day

by ICTMN Staff
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The question “Do Native Americans celebrate Thanksgiving?” has no simple answer. American Indians are not a monolithic people, but a collection of many cultures, and individuals within cultures are certainly bound to have different feelings about the day based on their own experiences and upbringings. “No, I don’t celebrate [Thanksgiving]” wrote Dennis Zotigh in a 2011 essay. “But I do take advantage of the holiday and get together with family and friends to share a large meal without once thinking of the Thanksgiving in 1621. I think it is the same in many Native households.”

Another answer many American Indians give to the question is that, yes, they do give thanks on the day designated Thanksgiving—just as they they give thanks for the gifts from the Creator every day. Being thankful is not something you do on a specific day, in a specific setting; being thankful is something you are.

Native expressions of thanks, of thanks-giving, are therefore not tied to a holiday or event. They are appropriate every day, including the day called Thanksgiving. The National Museum of the American Indian has shared the spirit of thankfulness with this version of a Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address …Read More.

Funding – 2016 Summer Indigenous Writer-in Residence & Summer Scholar Fellowships. Due: Jan 11, 2016

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Call for Applicants to Indigenous Writer-in-Residence Fellowship at the School for Advanced Research
The School for Advanced Research (SAR), with the generous support of Lannan Foundation, is seeking applicants for the Indigenous Writer-in-Residence fellowship.  The purpose of this fellowship is to advance the work of an indigenous writer pursuing their creative project while enabling them to interact with local scholarly, artist, and Native communities. The fellowship runs from mid-June to early August and is open to writers indigenous to the United States or Canada.  The fellow is provided with a $6,000 stipend, on-campus housing, studio space, supplies allowance, library support, and travel reimbursement to and from SAR.
The deadline to apply is Monday, January 11.  For more information and to access our online application system, please visit sarweb.org and click on the Programs link or call Maria Spray at 505-954-7237.
The School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe, NM invites applications for its 2016 Summer Scholar Fellowships.
SAR awards fellowships each year to several scholars in anthropology and related fields to pursue research or writing projects that promote understanding of human behavior, culture, society, and the history of anthropology. Scholars from the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apply.
Competitive proposals have a strong empirical dimension, meaning that they address the facts of human life on the ground. They also situate the proposed research within a specific cultural or historical context and engage a broad scholarly literature. Applicants should make a convincing case for the intellectual significance of their projects and their potential contribution to a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.
SAR provides summer scholars a small stipend, a rent-free apartment and office on campus, an allowance account, library support, and other benefits during a seven-week tenure, which starts in mid-June.
Two types of fellowships are available:
  • Ethel-Jane Westfeldt Bunting Fellowship. Up to three residential fellowships are available each summer for doctoral level scholars and PhD candidates in the social sciences, humanities, or arts.
  • William Y. and Nettie K. Adams Fellowship in the History of Anthropology. One residential fellowship is available each summer for a doctoral level scholar or PhD candidate whose project focuses on the history of anthropology.
Deadline for applications is January 11, 2016.
For more information on summer scholar fellowships and other SAR programs, please visit our website.

 

Jobs – Northwestern, Indigenous Studies Research Initiative – Three Open Positions

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https://chroniclevitae.com/jobs/0000910336-01

Open until filled
Date Posted     November 12, 2015
Type     Tenured, tenure track
Salary     Not specified
Employment Type     Full-time

Indigenous Studies Research Initiative
Three Open Positions

Northwestern University is pleased to announce an Indigenous Studies Research Initiative. Our goal is to build a critical mass of scholars working in the field of Indigenous Studies broadly construed. It is our hope that through close alignment and coordination with other Chicago-area institutions, we will make Northwestern University, as well as greater Chicago, centers of research and learning in the important field of Native American and Indigenous Studies. Area resources include the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry Library, The American Indian Center of Chicago, and the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, among others.

As an initial step, we announce searches for two tenure-track faculty positions and one postdoctoral fellow. We anticipate that these new colleagues will join our current faculty in designing and offering courses for undergraduate and graduate students related to indigenous studies and in advancing research in fields across the College and University.

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Native American and Indigenous Studies in the Humanities
We invite applications for a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in Native American and Indigenous Studies, to begin September 1, 2016. We seek a scholar, writer, or artist with expertise in the cultures, cultural production, and/or history of indigenous peoples, particularly, but not limited to, the native peoples of North America. The Fellow will be jointly appointed between the University’s Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities and an appropriate humanities-related department. Candidates must complete all degree requirements for a PhD before September 1, 2016. For more information, including instructions for how to submit an application, visit the Kaplan Institute’s website: http://www.humanities.northwestern.edu/people/open-positions/.

Assistant Professor of Native American and Indigenous Studies in the Humanities
We invite applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Native American and Indigenous Studies. We seek a scholar, writer, or artist with expertise in the cultures, cultural production, and/or history of indigenous peoples, particularly, but not limited to, the native peoples of North America. This person will be jointly appointed between the University’s Kaplan Institute for the Humanities and an appropriate humanities-related department, and will work closely with Northwestern undergraduates and graduate students. Candidates must have completed all degree requirements for a PhD or MFA before September 1, 2016. For more information, including instructions for how to submit an application, visit the Kaplan Institute’s website: http://www.humanities.northwestern.edu/ people/open-positions/.

Assistant Professor of Native American and Indigenous Studies in the Social Sciences
We invite applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Native American and Indigenous Studies. We seek a scholar who studies social disparities as they pertain to indigenous peoples, particularly, but not limited to, the native peoples of North America. da; is person will be jointly appointed between the University’s Institute for Policy Research and an appropriate social science-related department, and will work closely with Northwestern undergraduates and graduate students. Scholars with degrees in anthropology, communications, economics, education, law, political science, psychology, public health, sociology, statistics, and other related fields are encouraged to apply. Candidates must have completed all degree requirements for a PhD before September 1, 2016. We welcome applications from both newly-minted PhDs and senior assistant professor candidates. For more information about the Institute for Policy Research and to apply, visit http://www.ipr.northwestern.edu/about/ job-opportunities/.

Northwestern University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirrmative Action Employer of all protected classes including veterans and individuals with disabilities. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the United States.

– See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/jobs/0000910336-01?cid=jobs&elq=a7bcdbc6c5f64cc7a74ff17fc8c443da&elqCampaignId=1918&elqaid=7014&elqat=1&elqTrackId=42fd4933fd9e46d5935c381c33fc8e9c#sthash.j8tA4Trc.dpuf

Open until filled
Date Posted November 12, 2015
Type Tenured, tenure track
Salary Not specified
Employment Type Full-time
Indigenous Studies Research Initiative
Three Open Positions

Northwestern University is pleased to announce an Indigenous Studies Research Initiative. Our goal is to build a critical mass of scholars working in the field of Indigenous Studies broadly construed. It is our hope that through close alignment and coordination with other Chicago-area institutions, we will make Northwestern University, as well as greater Chicago, centers of research and learning in the important field of Native American and Indigenous Studies. Area resources include the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry Library, The American Indian Center of Chicago, and the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, among others.
As an initial step, we announce searches for two tenure-track faculty positions and one postdoctoral fellow. We anticipate that these new colleagues will join our current faculty in designing and offering courses for undergraduate and graduate students related to indigenous studies and in advancing research in fields across the College and University.

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Native American and Indigenous Studies in the Humanities
We invite applications for a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in Native American and Indigenous Studies, to begin September 1, 2016. We seek a scholar, writer, or artist with expertise in the cultures, cultural production, and/or history of indigenous peoples, particularly, but not limited to, the native peoples of North America. The Fellow will be jointly appointed between the University’s Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities and an appropriate humanities-related department. Candidates must complete all degree requirements for a PhD before September 1, 2016. For more information, including instructions for how to submit an application, visit the Kaplan Institute’s website: http://www.humanities.northwestern.edu/people/open-positions/.

Assistant Professor of Native American and Indigenous Studies in the Humanities
We invite applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Native American and Indigenous Studies. We seek a scholar, writer, or artist with expertise in the cultures, cultural production, and/or history of indigenous peoples, particularly, but not limited to, the native peoples of North America. This person will be jointly appointed between the University’s Kaplan Institute for the Humanities and an appropriate humanities-related department, and will work closely with Northwestern undergraduates and graduate students. Candidates must have completed all degree requirements for a PhD or MFA before September 1, 2016. For more information, including instructions for how to submit an application, visit the Kaplan Institute’s website: http://www.humanities.northwestern.edu/ people/open-positions/.
Assistant Professor of Native American and Indigenous Studies in the Social Sciences
We invite applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Native American and Indigenous Studies. We seek a scholar who studies social disparities as they pertain to indigenous peoples, particularly, but not limited to, the native peoples of North America. da; is person will be jointly appointed between the University’s Institute for Policy Research and an appropriate social science-related department, and will work closely with Northwestern undergraduates and graduate students. Scholars with degrees in anthropology, communications, economics, education, law, political science, psychology, public health, sociology, statistics, and other related fields are encouraged to apply. Candidates must have completed all degree requirements for a PhD before September 1, 2016. We welcome applications from both newly-minted PhDs and senior assistant professor candidates. For more information about the Institute for Policy Research and to apply, visit http://www.ipr.northwestern.edu/about/ job-opportunities/.

Northwestern University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirrmative Action Employer of all protected classes including veterans and individuals with disabilities. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the United States.

– See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/jobs/0000910336-01?cid=jobs&elq=a7bcdbc6c5f64cc7a74ff17fc8c443da&elqCampaignId=1918&elqaid=7014&elqat=1&elqTrackId=42fd4933fd9e46d5935c381c33fc8e9c#sthash.j8tA4Trc.dpuf

 

CFP – Storying Solidarities: Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts, University of Calgary. Due: Feb 1, 2016

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Storying Solidarities:
Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts

A Gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association
May 28th-29th, 2016
Academic Congress, The University of Calgary, Treaty 7 Territory

In the Traditional Lands of the Blackfoot Confederacy Calgary, Alberta, Canada

For its second annual gathering, and the first time at Academic Congress, the Indigenous Literary Studies Association seeks to think together about the sometimes conflicted relationship between alliance and autonomy in decolonial struggles as imagined, illustrated, and interrogated through Indigenous literary arts. While terms like “solidarity” and “alliance” tend to be valued as inherently positive, their often vague and uncritical application risks masking and thereby sustaining settler colonial power in ways that might threaten Indigenous autonomy and self-determination.

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to explore the tensions that persist between the generative possibilities of consensual alliance and the ongoing urgency for what Métis artist and scholar David Garneau calls “irreconcilable spaces of Aboriginality”: “gatherings, ceremony, Cree-only discussions, kitchen-table conversations, email exchanges, etc. in which Blackfootness, Métisness, Indianness, Aboriginality, and/or Indigeneity is performed apart from a Settler audience” (33). In particular, we invite participants to consider the ways in which Indigenous literary arts provide tools for imagining and enacting solidarities with genuinely decolonizing potential, while laying bare the ethical dimensions such solidarities demand.

We welcome participants to consider alliance in its multiple and expansive dimensions — among Indigenous nations, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, between Indigenous scholars and the communities with which they identify, between Indigenous decolonization movements and other social justice movements, and between Indigenous literary studies and Indigenous Studies more broadly. We also welcome participants to conceive of literary arts expansively; we welcome discussions of literature, film, theatre, storytelling, song, hip-hop, and other forms of narrative expression.

Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, including at least 15 minutes for collaborative dialogue. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with any of the following topics:

  • Autonomy and Alliance in Treaty 7 Territory
  • Confederacy, Intertribal Alliance, and the Literary Arts
  • The Terrain of “Solidarity” in Community-Based Participatory Research
  • What David Garneau calls “Irreconcilable Spaces of Aboriginality”
  • What Leanne Simpson calls “Sovereign Sites of Intimacy”
  • Activist Alliances among Indigenous and Diasporic Artists
  • Kinship and Alliance with the Other-than-Human
  • Art, Autonomy, and Idlenomore
  • Literary Methods and Narrative Arts as Praxis
  • Orality and Solidarity Building
  • Collaborative Creation and Multi-Media
  • Artistic Expressions of Sovereignty and Self-Determination
  • Land-based Solidarities and the Literary Arts
  • Intimacy and Erotics as Expressions of AllianceStorying Solidarities features keynote speakers Eldon Yellowhorn (confirmed) & Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (unconfirmed). The gathering also features the Renate Eigenbrod Memorial Mentorship Lunch, which will connect emerging artists and scholars with established mentors; both mentors and mentees can register for the event by contacting Deanna Reder at dhr@sfu.ca. In collaboration with the Canadian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Languages Studies, this year’s “Aboriginal Roundtable” will bring together artists, activists, and academics who will engage the theme: “Decolonial Solidarities: Ecology, Gender, and Ethical Calls to Action.” Those interested in participating in the roundtable as featured speakers, please contact Sophie McCall at smccall@sfu.ca.Proposals for individual presentations should include the presenter’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; the presentation’s title; and a 250-word abstract that should identify the presenter’s desired format. Proposals for special sessions should include the session organizer’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; a list of confirmed participants’ names and affiliations; the session’s title; a 250-word description of the session’s goals, format, and significance, and 100-word descriptions of each participant’s contribution to the session.

    The deadline for all proposals is February 1st, 2016. All proposals should be sent to ilsaconference@gmail.com.

CFP – pdf file: CFP Storying Solidarities for ILSA 2016

Dark Shadows Beneath A Brilliant Paradise

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Dark Shadows Beneath A Brilliant Paradise: The illusory promise of paradise obscures Hawaii’s fundamental problems.

NOVEMBER 23, 2015 ·By Zuri Aki

Civil Beat Honolulu

“Wish you were here!”

It’s the unofficial slogan of paradise everywhere. It is the invitation to the unfamiliar, the enticement of exotic beauties, the allure of untold adventure. It is the promise of pleasure and of dreams manifested into dreamlike reality.

“Wish you were here” is the picture-postcard, beckoning call for that evanescent moment that belongs to the privileged – but not to “you.”

Paradise for all is a paradox. The very notion of paradise implies an underlying element of exclusion – that is to say, the picture of paradise is large enough to capture your every desire, but small enough that not everyone will fit within it.

Paradise is paradise so long as most do not have a piece of it.

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DFS Galleria Waikiki life-sized hula dancer cutouts in a display along Royal Hawaiian Avenue. 9 jan 2015. Cory Lum/Civil Beat

As paradises go, the Hawaiian Islands have been the paradigm – at least, that is what the marketing campaigns have said.

The age-old trope of the Hawaiian paradise is the story of attraction between the weary traveler and the innocent native, set against the backdrop of an untouched natural place, where perpetual peace, prosperity and happiness would rain down from the heavens if not for the fact that heaven itself is the Hawaiian Islands. Hawaii is the ultimate escape from the utter torment of human civilization.

Or, maybe, Hawaii is tormented human civilization wearing a flower lei, an Aloha shirt, and a plastic smile.

Hawaii is not the innocent and naïve grass-skirt-wearing, coconut-bra-sporting girl who fawns over egomaniacal notions of self-stated superiority. We are not the jolly, overweight and carefree, ukulele-playing, brown-skinned guy who makes the perfect wingman in any Hawaiian adventure.

Behind the rhetoric is a roiling conflict: the struggle, from time immemorial, of Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) to secure for themselves the right to exist – a right made volatile over the century since we were told we did not have that right. Kanaka Maoli are burdened with care as every day becomes a fight for survival. We have to fight non-stop to protect iwi kupuna (the bones of our ancestors), wahi kapu (sacred places), Aina (the natural world), and ea (our way of life) from destruction.

Paradise is lost for many Kanaka Maoli, half of whom make up the great Hawaiian diaspora and no longer reside in their ancestral homeland. Antipathy to an unaccommodating system of governance manifests in frequent protests and the ongoing pursuit of self-governance.

Hawaii is not that untouched natural place with singing birds and frolicking fuzzy creatures that developers advertise in airline magazines. We are not endless stretches of white sand beaches, awe-inspiring pristine views and infinite natural resources, where you can have your piece while preserving paradise.

Beneath the trope is environmental devastation. The incredibly irresponsible, rapid and rampant urbanization of the Hawaiian Islands has played a critical role in making this isolated archipelago the “endangered species capital of the world.”

The incredibly irresponsible, rapid and rampant urbanization of the Hawaiian Islands has played a critical role in making this isolated archipelago the “endangered species capital of the world.
The Hawaii 2050 Sustainability Task Force reported in 2007 that “near self-sufficiency would require an estimated 243,000 acres” of good farmland. At that time, the inventory of good farmland in Hawaii was estimated to be around 249,000 acres – barely enough for “near self-sufficiency.”

In the eight years since, the Hawaii Land Use Commission, appointed by the governor, has approved rezoning thousands of acres of good farmland for urban development projects such as Ho‘opili, Koa Ridge, and potentially Olowalu Town.

The increasingly urban character of the Hawaiian Islands directly undermines the precautionary principle, long held by environmentalists, that development should take into account the need to conserve the natural world.

In 2013, the University of Hawaii produced a climate change study that has been characterized as the revelation of ruin for the Hawaiian Islands. And yet, urban development, or rather, unsustainable human consumption, continues to be business as usual.

Hawaii is not perpetual peace, prosperity, and happiness. We have a substantial houseless (homeless) population suffering what many believe to be inhumane, cruel and degrading treatment. These are human beings, a large number of whom are native to the Hawaiian Islands, and some of whom have found their way here because of injustice elsewhere. And the state’s answer to the overall problem – often the result of our flawed socio-political-economic system – is to sweep it under the proverbial rug or send the problem away so that the image of paradise can be preserved. Paradise is exclusive.
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The paradox of a-paradise-for-all is nowhere more evident than in the ridiculously high cost of living in Hawaii. The price of gas and electricity here is among the highest (if not the highest) in the nation. We are trapped in a job-challenged economy with greatly limited opportunities. We are seemingly stranded in a low-wage system because of the stranglehold of the tourism/construction oligopoly – so we earn little and we pay more.

Tourism is dependent on the image of paradise, while construction is dependent on the paving-over of paradise. The collision of these conflicting interests has produced a mangled wreck of human civilization under the guise of something that it is not.

With the average house here in Hawaii selling for triple the national average, and given the very limited space in these islands for houses to be built, there is undoubtedly a housing crisis.

Recently, the Building Industry Association of Hawaii, “the voice of the Construction Industry,” proposed that the solution to people being “priced out of paradise” is to deregulate and further incentivize the construction industry. In essence, the BIA suggests that the government make it easier to let the construction industry build and just let them do it.

Paving over the Hawaiian Islands with unsustainable urbanization may very well be an inevitability.
Curious as that may be, the character of paradise is not often – maybe not at all – associated with the hustle-and-bustle of unsustainable urban sprawl. The idea of building more to prevent being priced out of paradise is, in itself, a paradox within the paradox of a-paradise-for-all. Paving over the Hawaiian Islands with unsustainable urbanization may very well be an inevitability. And when every available space is spoken for, then surely there will be an exclusion – that is, if anyone still wants to live here (shout-out to the climate crisis).

The truth is, about 1.42 million people are carving out their piece of the Hawaiian Islands. How many pieces remain, until we, the people of Hawaii, realize that it isn’t the carefree, kick-back-and-relax-your-fears-away place being sold to vacationers and foreign investors?

If Hawaii was ever a paradise, then it has been tortured, beaten, derided, degraded, abused and misused. What remains of her former self is something pretending to be a brilliant paradise in order to hide its very dark shadows.

Maybe Hawaii isn’t a paradise and maybe that’s OK. Maybe we’re just an archipelagic community struggling with problems that actually need to be addressed, rather than ignored.

“You” are here, so let’s do something about it.

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About the Author
Zuri Aki
COLUMNIST

Zuri Aki has a B.A. in Hawaiian Studies from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and is a J.D. candidate at Richardson School of Law focusing on International Law and Environmental Law. He is the founder of the political watchdog organization, Makawalu, and the environmental conservation organization, The Aina Project. A self-described political creature, Zuri has his sights firmly fixed on enhancing local government policy in order to bolster Hawaii’s position on the ever-expanding global market.

NITEP Alumni and Friends Social, Nov 27, 2015

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NITEP alumni and friends are invited to gather for a reception at the Westin Bayshore, Vancouver following the FNESC Conference Workshops on Friday, November 27.

NITEP FNESC Gathering 2015-2.jpgPoster (PDF): NITEP FNESC Gathering 2015

Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians at the Frontline of Resistance

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Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians
at the Frontline of Resistance

With Robert Lovelace
Queens University Lecturer & former Anoch Algonquin Chief

Friday, November 27 @ 1pm

Room 098, Henry Angus Building
2053 Main Mall, Unceded & Occupied Musqueam Territory

For more information: sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Stolen Land : Stolen Voices Canada and Israel are both built on land and resources stolen by European settlers; both are still sustained by the ongoing repression of indigenous peoples. The indigenous peoples of Canada and Palestine are on the front lines resisting the destruction of the land by militarism and industrial extraction. In the mainstream media and the halls of power, indigenous activists’ voices and stories have been silenced – they are treated as terrorists or historical curiosities. This event will explore the commonalities of indigenous struggles for land and freedom in Canada and in Palestine as well as connections to the global fight for a decolonized world.

Robert Lovelace is an adjunct lecturer at Queen’s University specialising in Aboriginal Studies, Re-indigenisation and De-colonisation. Robert is an anti-colonial activist and retired chief of the Anoch Algonquin First Nation. He spent 3½ months in jail as a political prisoner for defending the Ardoch homeland from uranium exploration. Robert has sailed twice on the Freedom Flotilla attempting to break the siege of Gaza. He lives at Eel Lake in traditional Ardoch territory.

UBC Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights • sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Sponsored by UBC Social Justice Centre, Seriously Free Speech Committee. Endorsed by Boycott Israeli Apartheid Campaign, Canada Palestine Association/BDS Vancouver, Canadian Boat to Gaza, Independent Jewish Voices – Vancouver, Mobilisation Against War and Occupation, North West Indigenous Council, South Asian Network for Secularism and Democracy, Streams of Justice, United Network for a Just Peace in Palestine and Israel.

Indigenous conference compare differing research approaches

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Indigenous conference compare differing research approaches

By Lailani Upham

Dr. Bagele Chilisa, University of Botswana in Africa and author of “Indigenous Methodologies” is keynote speaker at the Indigenous Research Conference. (Courtesy photo)
Dr. Bagele Chilisa, University of Botswana in Africa and author of “Indigenous Methodologies” is keynote speaker at the Indigenous Research Conference. (Courtesy photo)

PABLO — Salish Kootenai College is the home of an Indigenous Research Conference where hundreds of researchers from around the world gather to compare notes.

All share a common philosophies – indigenous research methodologies differ from a western approach.

Western approach is where the researcher is separated from the data and the project, and is merely an observer.

Indigenous research flows from relationships.

Nearly 300 participants attended the third annual Indigenous Research Conference on October 22 – 24 at the SKC Joe McDonald Health Center.

The purpose is to educate and promote and incorporate methodologies into all research that engages indigenous peoples and communities around the worlds.

The new philosophy is that research is gained through relationships and the researcher knows the story or can tell it from a personal standpoint.

Participants came from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Alaska, South Africa, Sweden, and from across the United States.

Dr. Bagele Chilisa, author of Indigenous Methodologies (2012), of University of Botswana was one of the keynote speakers along with Dr. Patricia Cochran, Inupiat, from Alaska Native Science.

A researcher from Russian, Dr. Lilian Alissa was the banquet speaker.

Dr. Shawn Wilson, author of “Research is Ceremony” was part of a pre- conference workshop titled: Implementing the Indigenous paradigm into the proposal. Read More…

‘We’re failing aboriginal students’: U of S chancellor

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The University of Saskatchewan hopes to answer the calls to action laid out in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report by hosting a national forum on aboriginal education.

“Building Reconciliation” runs Wednesday and Thursday and brings together 180 university presidents, political leaders and educators from across Canada to discuss post-secondary education for indigenous students. Among the report’s recommendations are calls to establish degrees in aboriginal languages; provide adequate funding for the backlog of aboriginal students seeking higher education; and offer support for educators to incorporate more traditional knowledge and teaching methods in the classroom.

Featured speakers included Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde and Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada commissioner Justice Murray Sinclair, among other prominent leaders and educators. Read more…