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Month: December 2015

New Year’s Eve Vancouver: 2016 Countdown Festival and Fireworks

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Iceland to build first temple to Norse gods in 1,000 years

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Iceland to build first temple to Norse gods in 1,000 years

 

World | Tue Feb 3, 2015

Icelanders will soon be able to publicly worship at a shrine to Thor, Odin and Frigg with construction starting this month on the island’s first major temple to the Norse gods since the Viking age.

Worship of the gods in Scandinavia gave way to Christianity around 1,000 years ago but a modern version of Norse paganism has been gaining popularity in Iceland.

“I don’t believe anyone believes in a one-eyed man who is riding about on a horse with eight feet,” said Hilmar Orn Hilmarsson, high priest of ‘Asatruarfelagid’, an association that promotes faith in the Norse gods.

“We see the stories as poetic metaphors and a manifestation of the forces of nature and human psychology.”

Membership in Asatruarfelagid has tripled in Iceland in the last decade to 2,400 members last year, out of a total population of 330,000, data from Statistics Iceland showed. Read more…

 

Legal warriors: Profiles of 5 indigenous lawyers

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Legal warriors: Profiles of 5 indigenous lawyers

From navigating inquiries to defending the land, 5 indigenous lawyers are making a difference

CBC News Posted: Dec 29, 2015 5:00 AM ET

Armed with a law degree, Caleb Behn is emerging as one of the fiercest defenders of Dene territory against the fracking industry.

Armed with a law degree, Caleb Behn is emerging as one of the fiercest defenders of Dene territory against the fracking industry. (Two Island Films)

There was a time in Canada when indigenous peoples weren’t allowed to hire lawyers without the permission of government officials, and First Nations people couldn’t enter law school without first renouncing their “Indian status.”

That all changed in 1954 when the late William Wuttunee graduated from the University of Saskatchewan, becoming Western Canada’s first status Indian lawyer.

Since then, many indigenous people across the country have followed in Wuttunee’s footsteps, graduating from law school, being called to bar and succeeding in a field that was until recently off-limits to them.

Here’s a look at five indigenous people who are using the legal profession to change Canada.

Donald Worme

Donald Worme

Cree lawyer Donald Worme is from the Kawacatoose First Nation in Saskatchewan. (CBC)

A founding member of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, Donald Worme is a Cree lawyer based in Saskatoon.

From the Kawacatoose First Nation, Worme first rose to prominence for his work in the Neil Stonechild inquiry in 2003, during which he represented Stonechild’s family.

Since then, Worme has represented many families and groups who often find themselves at odds with police and the justice system. These include the family of Matthew Dumas, shot and killed by Winnipeg police in 2005, and Kinew James, who died in Saskatoon’s Regional Psychiatric Centre in 2013.

Worme was also commission counsel between 2004 and 2006 at the Ipperwash Inquiry — which was tasked with investigating what led to the shooting death of unarmed Anishinaabe protester Dudley George — was more recently, for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

Jean Teillet

Jean Teillet

A great-grandniece of famous Métis leader Louis Riel, Jean Teillet has emerged as a staunch legal defender of indigenous rights. (University of Toronto)

A great-grandniece of famed Métis leader Louis Riel, Jean Teillet had two-decade career in theatre – dancing, acting, teaching and choreographing – before entering the University of Toronto’s law school at age 38.

When she graduated in 1994, she quickly established herself as a staunch defender of indigenous rights.

In 2003, Teillet won a landmark victory in the Supreme Court of Canada for Métis rights. The case centred on Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., resident Steve Powley who was charged with hunting moose without a licence.

Now a partner with Pape Salter Teillet LLP, Teillet specializes in aboriginal rights law, a field in which she’s won numerous awards, including the 2011 Indigenous Peoples’ Council award by the Indigenous Bar Association and a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Outside the courtroom, Teillet helped create the Métis Nation of Ontario and has served as vice president and treasurer of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, and founding president of the Métis Nation Lawyers Association.

Christa Big Canoe

Christa Big Canoe

In 2014, lawyer Christa Big Canoe testified before a House committee reviewing C-26, the government’s controversial prostitution law. (CBC)

A member of the Georgina Island First Nation, an Anishinaabe community in Ontario, Christa Big Canoe is the legal advocacy director of Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto.

Big Canoe, known as a passionate advocate for First Nation children and women’s rights, has appeared before all levels of court in Canada where she’s provided an aboriginal perspective and representation on issues that most affect aboriginal people in Canadian law.

While at Legal Aid Ontario, she led the province-wide Aboriginal Justice Strategy aimed at removing barriers to accessing justice for First Nation, Métis and Inuit people.

Most recently, Big Canoe is representing six of the seven families of the students whose deaths are the subject of an inquest in Thunder Bay. All of the young people came to the city from remote First Nations to attend high school.

Katherine Hensel

Jonathan Rudin, Katherine Hensel

“There needs to be a 360 degree analysis of what happens in Canadian courtrooms, in the Canadian justice system,” lawyer Katherine Hensel told the CBC. (Law Society Gazette )

Katherine Hensel was called to the bar in 2003.

Just a year later, the member of the Secwepemc nation began to serve as assistant commission counsel for the Ipperwash Inquiry.

After working with a prominent litigation firm for several years, Hensel left to establish Hensel Barristers in 2011. She’s since been involved with several cases involving indigenous rights, and served as counsel for the Native Women’s Association of Canada during the British Columbia’s Missing and Murdered Women’s Inquiry.

Hensel often speaks to the media about issues surrounding indigenous peoples, including a recent appearance on CBC’s The Current, where she offered pointed criticism of the justice system in the wake of a controversial not-guilty decision in the Cindy Gladue murder trial.

“There needs to be a 360-degree analysis of what happens in Canadian courtrooms, in the Canadian justice system,” Hensel said.

Caleb Behn

Caleb Behn

Caleb Behn hasn’t been called to the bar yet, but plans to use law to defend his traditional territory against fracking. (Zack Embree)

He’s not even been called to the bar yet, but Caleb Behn is already planning to use the law to defend the traditional territory of his people, the Dene.

Behn was born into in a very political family, with several close relatives serving as chiefs. He grew up in northern British Columbia, a land increasingly changed as the oil and gas industry grows.

Driven by a responsibility to protect that land and water, Behn entered law school at the University of Victoria.

Before officially entering his chosen profession, Behn has seen that goal — and his life — become the subject of a critically acclaimed 2015 documentary, Fractured Land.

“Anybody who can throw a hatchet and sue you is a force to be reckoned with,” said Bill McKibben, 350.org founder.

(2015, December 29) Legal warriors: Profiles of 5 indigenous lawyers. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/legal-warriors-five-indigenous-lawyers-1.3371819

Funding – Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship, UBC

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Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship

The University of British Columbia offers multi-year fellowships to Master’s and doctoral Aboriginal students. Award winners are selected on the basis of academic merit through an annual competition, administered by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in consultation with the First Nations House of Learning. Approximately a dozen new fellowships are offered each year.

Amount: $16,175 – $18,200 per annum plus tuition

Deadline: G+PS deadline 12 February, 2016, applicants are to check with their graduate program for its internal deadline

Eligibility Summary

?         All Aboriginal students are eligible to apply, but priority is given to Aboriginal graduate students whose traditional territory falls, at least in part, within Canada.

?         Applicants may or may not be UBC graduate students at the time of application – the competition is open to both incoming and continuing graduate students.

Nomination Procedures / Materials

?         completed Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship Application Form

?         copy of applicant’s Canadian Common CV (use the CGS Master’s form, save as a pdf)

?         copies of all university-level transcripts to 31 Dec 2015 (print-out of Academic History from SISC is acceptable for UBC transcript).

For complete information about this competition, please see the Graduate Awards website: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/aboriginal-graduate-fellowships

Peabody Essex Museum receives grant to support Native American Fellowship

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Setting up for “Native Fashion Now” at the Peabody Essex Museum.

DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF

Setting up for “Native Fashion Now” at the Peabody Essex Museum.

The Peabody Essex Museum has received a $750,000 grant to expand a fellowship program intended to train aspiring Native American museum professionals. The three-year grant, awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will enable the museum to increase the number of fellows it admits annually, extend the program to 12 weeks, and introduce more formal mentoring programs.

“We’re absolutely delighted to be partnering with the Mellon Foundation,” said PEM director Dan Monroe. “It offers an opportunity for more young Native American leaders to significantly strengthen their capabilities to be successful in many cultural arenas — be it in their communities or in the context of their existing institutions, whether it’s an art museum like PEM or another organization.”

First created by the museum six years ago, the Native American Fellowship program is believed to be the only one of its kind in the country. Reserved for students of Native American or native Hawaiian descent, the program provides specific fellowships in curatorial, educational, media, and manuscript processing. Read More…

New Issue in Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society

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Dear friends,

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society has just published its
latest issue at http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/issue/view/1618.

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web
site to review and read articles and items of interest.

We’re thrilled to continue to publish as an open access journal and
appreciate your ongoing support in sharing this work as widely as possible
through your networks!

In peace,

Eric Ritskes
Editor

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society
Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Table of Contents
http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/issue/view/1618

Cover Art
——–

Artist’s statement: What decolonization means to me
Kalkidan Assefa

Articles
——–

Indigenous girls and the violence of settler colonial policing
Jaskiran K. Dhillon
Refusal to forgive: Indigenous women’s love and rage
Rachel Flowers
Teaching Indigenous methodology and an Iñupiaq example
Maureen P. Hogan,       Sean A. Topkok
Beyond the colonial divide: African diasporic and Indigenous youth alliance
building for HIV prevention
Ciann L. Wilson,        Sarah Flicker,  Jean-Paul Restoule
Tensional decolonization and public order in Western Nigeria, 1957-1960
Oluwatoyin Oduntan,     Kemi Rotimi
Reviews
——–

A review of Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Research Methodology
Elaine Coburn
Indigenous temporal priority and the (de)legitimization of the Canadian
state: A book review of On Being Here to Stay
Scott Kouri

________________________________________________________________________
Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society
www.decolonization.org

CFP – Queer U 2016 Call for Submissions EXTENSION to Jan 3, 2016

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Queer U 2016 “Claiming our Power, Claiming Ourselves: Healing our Communities Through (Un)Learning” – Jan 3, 2016

 

As part of Outweek (Feb 5-12), The Pride Collective is organizing Queer U, an annual academic conference on sexualities and genders. The conference centers on bringing the research and work of students and established scholars from across the west coast of north america and beyond to a broad audience in an attempt to foster understanding and discussion.

 

This year, the theme is “Claiming our Power, Claiming Ourselves: Healing our Communities Through (Un)Learning”. Our queerness is political and we are doing the work to undo cisheteronormative and homonormative narratives. This Outweek is organized with the intentions of strengthening our communities by recognizing the ways in which queer communities need to be actively working to do better, and how that is intricately related to the ways we heal, collectively and with ourselves. Please try to work this into your presentation, but any and all submissions will be considered.

 

This call for papers is open to undergraduate and graduate contributors and established scholars from any department or area of research that relates to sexuality and gender. Strong undergraduate submissions are also accepted. Workshop Proposals related to community are welcome as well. All topics are welcome; however Queer U is especially seeking submissions dealing with the following topics:

  • Queer & Trans* Healing
  • Critiques of Homonormativity
  • Relationships between Community & Wellness
  • Intersections of Queer/Trans* Communities with Systems of Power
  • Anti-racist, Indigenous, and/or Intersectional Feminist Approaches are Encouraged!

 

If interested, send in a short (300 word or less) abstract outlining the paper, presentation, and/or workshop to prideubc@gmail.com no later than January 3rd, 2016. Please title email Queer U abstract.

 

The Queer U Conference is open to the general public. It will take place on Saturday, February 6th from 11am to 5pm.

Funding – Mackenzie King Memorial Scholarships, Due: Feb 1, 2016

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Mackenzie King Memorial Scholarships

The Open Scholarship is available to graduates of Canadian universities who pursue graduate study in any discipline, in Canada or elsewhere. One Open Scholarship is awarded each year. The Traveling Scholarship is available to graduates of Canadian universities who pursue graduate study in the United States or the United Kingdom in the areas of international relations or industrial relations (including the international or industrial relations aspects of law, history, politics and economics). Recently four scholarships have been awarded annually.

Please note that this competition requires all signatures to be original (in ink). Please advise your reference writers accordingly.

Deadline: A complete application package must be received by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies by 4:00pm on Monday 1 February 2016

Amount: $8,500 – $10,500 (subject to change)

Further information is available on the G+PS website at: http://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/mackenzie-king-memorial-scholarships

Upcoming Indigenous Events at the Museum of Anthropology

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The Sepik River of Papua New Guinea is one of the largest river systems in the world, extraordinarily beautiful, but seldom visited. This exhibition will not only showcase the finest contemporary collection of these works in Canada – it will also raise awareness of environmental risks from proposed logging and mining operations that threaten the cultural and natural environs of the region.

Save the Date: Join us for the opening party on March 1, 2016.

 

 

  • Coastal First Nations Dance Festival

The 2016 Coastal First Nations Dance Festival returns to MOA in March with special performances and school programs. The festival will showcase the diverse and rich cultural traditions practiced by a selection of some of the best artists from coastal British Columbia, the Yukon, as well as national and international guest artists. The museum’s Great Hall will be transformed into a celebration of Indigenous cultures and dance traditions.

The 2016 Coastal First Nations Dance Festival is produced by the Dancers of Damelahamid in partnership with the Museum of Anthropology.

 

Vancouver artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish and Okanagan descent, is the focus in this provocative exhibition of new and existing paintings, drawings, sculptures, and installation works that confront the colonialist suppression of First Nations people, and the ongoing struggle for Aboriginal rights to lands, resources, and sovereignty.

Save the Date: Join us for the opening party on May 10, 2016.

 
  • Holiday Tours:
    December 19 – January 3
    11:00am- MOA Tour (55 min)
    1:00pm- Potlatch Collection Highlights (25 min)
    2:00pm- MOA Tour (55 min)

    Holiday tours end January 3rd. Check our website for the regular and holiday tour schedules.

  • Regular Tours starting January 4:
    Wednesday – Sunday:
    11:30am- MOA tour (55 min)
    2:00pm- MOA tour (55 min)

    Tuesday:
    11:30am- MOA tour (55 min)
    2:00- MOA tour (55 min)
    6:00pm- MOA Tour (55 min)

    All tours are free with museum admission.

  • Holiday Hours:
    Open December 31, 10am – 3pm
    Open January 1, 10am – 5pm
    *Please note that the café will be closed January 1.

 

 

 

Job – Assistant or Associate Professor, Inclusive Education, University of Regina. Due: Feb. 28, 2016

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TENURE-TRACK POSITION – ASSISTANT PROFESSOR INCLUSIVE EDUCATION

The Faculty of Education, University of Regina is inviting applications for a Full-time, Tenure-Track Position appointment beginning July 1, 2016.

The Faculty of Education seeks an individual who can work in the area of Inclusive Education with a focus on a variety of disabilities/exceptionalities. The Faculty has a strong orientation towards social justice issues in education and is committed to enacting the themes, vision, values and mission of the University’s Strategic Plan – peyak aski kikawinaw: Together We Are Stronger.

Duties:

The individual will be responsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate classes in Inclusive Education and Core Studies as part of the Educational Psychology program area, supervising undergraduate students in field experiences, supervising graduate students with their research, assuming active involvement in collegial governance and Faculty endeavors and engaging in individual and collaborative scholarly research.

Qualifications:

The successful individual will ideally possess a Ph.D. degree, or be near its completion when taking up the position, with a focus on Inclusive Education particularly as it relates to students with disabilities/exceptionalities. The individual should demonstrate successful teaching (or related experience) in K-12 schools, and, will ideally have experience with including/teaching students with disabilities/exceptionalities in regular school settings. As well, the candidate should demonstrate teaching in a university environment and have an active research agenda. Bilingualism (English/French) would be an asset.

Salary Range:

Depending on qualifications and experience, normally in the Assistant Professor range ($83,787 – $106,571). Starting Date: July 1, 2016

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Paul Clarke, Associate Dean, Faculty Development & Human Resources, Faculty of Education E-mail: Paul.Clarke@uregina.ca
Tel: 306-585-5353
Fax: 306-585-5330

Web: http://www.uregina.ca/hr/careers

To Apply:

Applicants should send a cover letter, current curriculum vitae, photocopies of transcripts, teaching philosophy, description of scholarly research program, and the names and contact information of three referees by February 28, 2016 to:

Dr. Jennifer Tupper, Dean Faculty of Education University of Regina
3737 Wascana Parkway Regina, SK S4S 0A2

Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority; however, all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply. The University of Regina is committed to achieving a representative workforce. Qualified diversity group members are encouraged to self-identify on their applications.

Tenure-Track Assistant Professor – Inclusive Education – Dec 2015