Month: January 2016

Graduate Pathways to Success Sessions: Time Mgmt, Stats (2 group comparisons), Boundary Setting

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Subject: Graduate Pathways to Success: Time Mgmt, Stats (2 group comparisons), Boundary Setting

Registration is now open for:
Time Management (in collaboration with Mitacs Step)
Tuesday, 2 February 2016 – 9:00am to 5:00pm
For more information or to register, please visit: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/12922-time-management

SCARL III: Two Group Comparisons and Beyond
In this statistics session, there will be a detailed discussion and demonstration of how to compare data from two groups or conditions. From this common type of analysis, we generalize to comparisons of more than two groups. Covers t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and more.
Wednesday, 3 February 2016 – 10:00am to 12:30pm
For more information or to register, please visit: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/12933-scarl-iii-two-group-comparisons-beyond

Setting and Maintaining Good Boundaries (in collaboration with the UBC Life & Career Centre)
This seminar is designed for graduate students who are experiencing stress because of the challenge of managing many demands, and need to practice setting boundaries around their time and space.
Thursday, 4 February 2016 – 9:30am to 12:30pm
For more information or to register, please visit: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/13084-setting-maintaining-good-boundaries

PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series – Public Scholars Initiative Event #2: Innovation for Public Good
Brief description: Innovation is important; so is the public good. But how do they go together? PhD students from UBC’s Public Scholars Initiative share their projects, and innovation experts offer their insights.
February 4th; 6:30 – 8:30 PM. For further information and to register, visit https://survey.ubc.ca/s/psinnovation/

January is Sexual Assault Awareness Month at UBC. Visit http://students.ubc.ca/livewell/topics/sexual-assault/sexual-assault-awareness-month for events and other information.

Reach out. Help prevent suicide. Reaching out early and preventing suicide requires everyone’s help. Show your support for suicide awareness and prevention: wear orange on Suicide Awareness Day, Jan 27th: http://ow.ly/VD7hO

Thank you,
Jacqui.

Jacqui Brinkman
Manager, Graduate Pathways to Success Program | Office of the Dean | Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
The University of British Columbia | Vancouver Campus
Phone 604 827 4578 | Fax 604 822 5802
170 – 6371 Crescent Road | Vancouver, BC  Canada V6T 1Z2
jacqui.brinkman@ubc.ca | http://www.grad.ubc.ca

Angelique EagleWoman becomes new dean of Lakehead law school

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Attorney and professor brings a wealth of experience in Indigenous law, say university officials

CBC News Posted: Jan 13, 2016 6:40 AM ETLast Updated: Jan 13, 2016 11:43 AM ET

Angelique EagleWoman has been appointed the new dean of Lakehead University's Bora Laskin Faculty of Law. EagleWoman will leave her current postion at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she is a law professor and a legal
scholar.

Angelique EagleWoman has been appointed the new dean of Lakehead University’s Bora Laskin Faculty of Law. EagleWoman will leave her current postion at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she is a law professor and a legal scholar. (Supplied)

Listen to audio recording…

A northern Ontario university says the new dean of its law school will be the first aboriginal woman to hold that position in Canada.

Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ont., has appointed Angelique EagleWoman to lead the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law starting in May, a month before the fledgling law school’s first class is set to graduate.

EagleWoman will leave her current postion at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she is a law professor and a legal scholar.

She told CBC News she’s impressed with the Lakehead faculty’s focus on rural and small-town practice, environmental law, and Indigenous law.

“Those three areas are all areas I’ve taught in and I have experience in, and I write a lot of articles about,” she said. “So I just thought ‘what a perfect match.'”

EagleWoman has taught in the areas of Tribal Nation economics and law, and Native American natural resources law. She has also published articles on topics like tribal economics and quality of life for Indigenous peoples, according to a Lakehead University press release.

Wants to build ‘distinguished’ law school

She takes over the position in Thunder Bay from the school’s first dean, Lee Stuesser, who resigned in 2015.

EagleWoman said she doesn’t feel that being relatively new to Canada will be an issue, adding that things like environmental law and Indigenous law share common traits on both sides of the border.

“The Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommendations coming out are very common issues with people that are both in the United States and in Canada who are Indigenous,” she said.

“So there’s a real commonality there, and the land doesn’t know political boundaries.”

EagleWoman said she wants to see the school grow and continue to be a forward-thinking institution.

“I hope to move the law school from the start-up phase to taking its place as a distinguished law school, along with the other Ontario and national law schools,” she said.

A biography posted on the school’s site says one of the highlights of her career was serving as general counsel for her own tribe, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate in Dakota.

with files from The Canadian Press.

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Audio – Angelique EagleWoman becomes new dean of Lakehead law school. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/law-school-canada-aboriginal-dean-1.3400903?__vfz=tc%3D7c4KA0bOGi9

Skwomesh language activist to launch ‘trailblazing’ immersion course at B.C. university

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Students to be taught indigenous language 5 days a week at Simon Fraser University

By Duncan McCue, CBC News Posted: Jan 14, 2016 6:38 PM ETLast Updated: Jan 15, 2016 11:36 AM ET

"My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don't have enough people," says 26-year-old Khelsilem.

“My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don’t have enough people,” says 26-year-old Khelsilem. (Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

A young man’s determined efforts to revive his ancestral language — which started with grassroots language nights in his father’s home five years ago — reached a new milestone this week with the announcement that he’ll be leading a full-time adult immersion program for the Skwomesh language at Simon Fraser University in September.

“My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don’t have enough people,” says 26-year-old Khelsilem (his traditional Skwomesh name).

The program would like to have 15 students learning Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim (the 7 represents a glottal stop or a slight pause) — or in English, the Skwomesh language — seven hours a day, five days a week.

Khelsilem teaching

Khelsilem will be one of two lead instructors of an innovative indigenous language program at Simon Fraser University, which is now accepting applicants. (Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

Khelsilem will be one of two lead instructors of the program, which is now accepting applicants. After completing 1,000 classroom hours, students graduate with a certificate in First Nations language proficiency.

It’s modeled after similar indigenous language programs in Canada and New Zealand. Khelsilem says he was inspired by a trip to the community of Kahnawake in Quebec, where he learned about Mohawk immersion efforts.

“I was able to see how many years of running an adult immersion program has created a community of language speakers … that permeates through many institutions in the community, whether schools, community centres, hospital, daycares or administrative centres,” says Khelsilem.

“When I saw that, it was clear to me what was really needed in my community.”

The Squamish Nation has a population of 4,000 members with a vast traditional territory that ranges from North Vancouver to the city of Squamish, 60 kilometres north of Vancouver.

But a 2014 report on the status of B.C. First Nations languages listed Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim as “critically endangered,” with only seven fluent speakers remaining.

Immersion-based approach

Until now, the options for Squamish Nation members interested in learning the language have been limited to Skwomesh classes in local elementary and high schools. There are also evening classes for adult learners, which are university-accredited but sporadic. Khelsilem says a few hours a week of language instruction can’t turn a student into a language speaker.

“You might become knowledgeable in aspects of the language, but it won’t make you into a conversational speaker that can talk to fluent speakers, or describe events, people and locations.”

Marianne Ignace

“It’s a trail-blazing project (in British Columbia),” says Professor Marianne Ignace, director of SFU’s First Nations Language Centre. (SFU)

Professor Marianne Ignace, the director of SFU’s First Nations Language Centre, believes the Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim immersion project has exciting prospects for revitalizing the language.

It’s a trailblazing project (in British Columbia),” says Ignace, a community member of the Skeetchesen First Nation and fluent speaker of secwepemctsin.

“We know in our hearts it’s nearly impossible for somebody who studies their First Nations language at the pace of two to three hours a week — and they need to pump in 1,000 hours to get good at it.”

SFU has certified over 200 students in 15 indigenous languages over the past two decades, says Ignace but only recently began offering opportunities to learn in immersion settings.

The centre ran a four-month immersion “boot-camp” for the Haida language in Haida Gwaii last winter. It’s also piloting a “language house” project with the Osoyoos First Nation and Penticton Indian Band, immersing 15 students in the Okanagan language, known as nsyilxcen, for two-days per week.

“We can see how much faster learners are able to progress, if it’s the full-time immersion based approach,” says Ignace.

“It’s hard to sustain that energy, but we’re losing our elders so fast. We’re in a desperate situation to produce intermediate and advanced speakers as fast as we can.”

Funding indigenous language learning

Khelsilem, a semi-fluent speaker of Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim, began learning from cassette tapes as a teenager. Once he became more proficient, he launched an online language blog in 2011, designed to reach and teach Squamish Nation members in any location with his self-designed podcasts and YouTube videos.

That evolved into a Language House, where three residents lived and spoke Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim daily.

Khelsilem 'language house'

Khelsilem was once part of ‘Language House,’ where three residents lived and spoke Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim daily. (Duncan McCue)

All these efforts were do-it-yourself volunteer affairs, supplemented with contributions from crowdfunding campaigns. But Khelsilem says he recognizes the key to developing a community of language speakers is to make it financially viable for language students.

“A couple ofpost community members have indicated their boss would give them a year leave of absence to take the program, but they won’t be earning income during that time. We want to make language learning financially accessible to people.”

The partnership with Simon Fraser University means students who are First Nation members will be eligible to apply for post-secondary funding to cover tuition costs, as well as a monthly living allowance.

Khelsilem has founded a not-for-profit organization called Kwi Awt Stelmexw, hoping to raise $30,000 for student scholarships, and plans to hold a gala fundraiser this March in North Vancouver.

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Skwomesh language activist to launch ‘trailblazing’ immersion course at B.C. university. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/skwomesh-language-activist-b-c-university-launch-immersion-course-1.3404541?__vfz=tc%3D1m3KDoFKsn9

Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

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Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

Veronica Puskas wins an award for excellence at Quilt Canada’s national juried show

CBC News Posted: Jun 26, 2014 5:57 AM CTLast Updated: Jun 26, 2014 12:43 PM CT

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont. (Courtesy Veronica Puskas)

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

A former resident of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories has been recognized at a national quilt show.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas quilt

Veronica Puskas’ quilt, called ‘Pillars of Strength,’ is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

Her quilt, called Pillars of Strength, is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950.

Puskas says the quilt honours her grandmother, but making it also helped her.

“I hope to encourage people that are going through difficult times that through doing some artwork or doing something to make something beautiful is very cathartic,” she says. “It helps you deal with the emotions and the hurt while doing it.”

Puskas says she started working on the project many years ago and then set it aside. In the end, it was truly a labour of love.

Veronica Puskas quilt (detail)

Detail from Pillars of Strength. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

“Mom used to tell us you can do better than that and that’s all I kept hearing.”

Puskas’ quilt was selected out of about 80 entries in her category.

Marilyn Michelin, chair of the event, says Puskas’ skill is remarkable.

“To do people in a picture is just unbelievable,” she says. “The talent that people have for that.”

Puskas now lives in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

She says she’ll keep using Nunavut and the North as inspiration for future projects.

Nuliavuk

Nuliavuk by Veronica Puskas was recently displayed at a local exhibit in Ontario. (Yellowknife Quilters’ Guild)

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/inuk-woman-from-the-kivalliq-wins-national-quilting-award-1.2688197?cmp=abfb

Upcoming Doctoral Defences

Posted on Updated on

  • Jeff Jordan Baker, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

    Supervisor:  Professor Cynthia Nicol
    Learning to Relate: An Exploration of Indigenous Science Education
    Wednesday, January 27, 2016 – 1:30 p.m. – Boardroom, First Nations Longhouse, 1985 West Mall

  • Rheanna Robinson, Department of Educational Studies
    Supervisor: Jo-ann Archibald
    Weaving Indigenous Knowledge into the Academy: Promises and Challenges from the Perspective of Three Aboriginal Post-Secondary Institutes in British Columbia
    Friday, January 29, 2016 | 9:30 a.m. | First Nations Longhouse, Boardroom, 1985 West Mall

UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival. Feb 5, 2016, 12-5pm

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UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival

February 5, 2016
12:00pm-5:00pm

AMS Student Nest
6133 University Boulevard

This is a free event and open to the public.  Families are welcome.
Registration is not required.

Celebrate the Year of the Monkey in grand style

The UBC Centennial Lunar New Year Festival is an intercultural celebration of Lunar New Year traditions, for all members of the UBC community. It is a great opportunity to get involved in one of the campus’ largest cultural events.

Come share in the excitement of the Lunar New Year with fun, educational and interactive arts and crafts, games, musical and dance performances, and cultural activities for people of all ages.

February 8 marks the beginning of the Year of the Monkey for many families around the world including Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese. Traditionally held as a 15-day festival, Lunar New Year is a significant time for many UBC students, faculty and staff, alumni, and families across the Lower Mainland.

We acknowledge that this event will be taking place on the occupied, unceded, traditional, and ancestral territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) nation.

Event partners:
Asian Studies, Asian Library, UBC Equity and Inclusion Office, Institute of Asian Research, and UBC Recreation.

Read More…

[in education] New Issue Published

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Readers:

[in education], an open access, peer reviewed journal exploring the
landscape of the field of education has just published its latest issue at
http://ineducation.ca/ineducation. We invite you to review the Table of
Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of
interest.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Patrick Lewis, Editor-in-Chief
Shuana Niessen, Managing Editor, in education

[in education] is a peer-reviewed, open access journal based in the Faculty
of Education at the University of Regina, in Saskatchewan, Canada. The
journal has been in existence since 1993, but published its first issue as
an online journal in December of 2009. To access archives, click on the
archives tab.

Follow in education on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ineducationca

in education
Vol 21, No 2 (2015): Autumn 2015
Table of Contents
http://ineducation.ca/ineducation/issue/view/23

Editorial
——–
Editorial (1-2)
James McNinch,  Valerie Mulholland

Articles
——–
Possibilities for Students At-Risk: Schools as Sites for Personal
Transformation (3-25)
Brenda J. McMahon
The Gap Between Text and Context: An Analysis of Ontario’s Indigenous
Education Policy (26-48)
Jesse K. Butler
Thinking Together:  A Duoethnographic Inquiry Into the Implementation of a
Field Experience Curriculum (49-64)
Jackie Seidel,  Laurie Hill
Finding Courage in the Unknown: Transformative Inquiry as Indigenist Inquiry
(65-88)
Michele Tanaka
Indigenous Knowledge Realized: Understanding the Role of Service Learning at
the Intersection of Being a Mentor and a College-Going American Indian
(89-109)
Christine A. Nelson,    Natalie R. Youngbull
Inquiring Into the Assessment Education of Preservice Teachers: A
Collaborative Self-Study of Teacher Educators (110-126)
Elizabeth Ann Munroe,   Jennifer Mitton-Kükner, Deborah Graham
Using Art-Based Ways of Knowing to Explore Leadership and Identity With
Native American Deaf Women (127-149)
Damara Goff Paris
Reading Silenced Narratives: A Curricular Journey Into Innu Poetry and
Reconciliation (150-170)
Julie Vaudrin-Charette
Bush Cree Storytelling Methodology: Northern Stories that Teach, Heal, and
Transform (171-178)
Herman Michell

Book Review
——–
A Review of There is No Need to Talk About This: Poetic Inquiry from the Art
Therapy Studio, by Karen O. Wallace (179-181)
Shuana Niessen

________________________________________________________________________
in education
http://ineducation.ca

Job – Assistant Professor, Indigenous Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies. Due: Feb 12, 2016

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The Department of Sociology at the University of Manitoba invites applications for a full-time tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of Indigenous Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies. Position Number:  21467.

The appointment will begin on July 1, 2016, or as soon as possible thereafter. The Department seeks a Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies scholar with research and teaching specialization related to Indigenous peoples and law and/or Indigenous criminology. In addition to specialized courses related to Indigenous Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies, the candidate must be able to teach core introductory Criminology courses (SOC 2510, Criminology and SOC 2610, Criminal Justice and Corrections). The ideal candidate will have a Ph.D. in Sociology, Criminology, or Socio-Legal Studies by the commencement of the appointment, but applicants in cognate disciplines may be considered. The successful candidate must have demonstrated competence in teaching and research. Duties for this position include course development, undergraduate and graduate teaching, graduate supervision, research in the candidate’s area of expertise, and service within the University and the community. Starting salary will be commensurate with experience and qualifications.

The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. The University of Manitoba is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from women, members of racialized communities, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, persons of all sexual orientations and genders, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The Department of Sociology at the University of Manitoba is the second largest department in the Faculty of Arts. Our faculty and students form an active and collegial community committed to excellence in teaching and research. We offer undergraduate programs in Sociology and Criminology and M.A. and Ph.D. programs. Further information concerning the Department and the University may be obtained from http://www.umanitoba.ca/sociology

In order to expedite the selection process, the following documents should be provided to the Search Committee: 1) a letter of application, 2) a statement of how the applicant’s program of study qualifies her/him for the position sought, 3) a brief statement of teaching philosophy and interests, a sample course outline, and evidence of effective teaching, 4) a curriculum vitae, 5) three confidential letters of reference to be received directly from the applicant’s referees, and 6) sample of written work. Applications are to be sent by email to:

Dr. Andrew Woolford, Chair, Search Committee, Department of Sociology, 318 Isbister Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2

Email: Andrew.Woolford@umanitoba.ca; Phone: (204) 474-6058.

 

Deadline for initial review of applications is February 12, 2016. If necessary, the review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

 

Application materials, including letters of reference will be handled in accordance with the protection of privacy provisions of “The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (Manitoba). Please note that each curriculum vitae may be provided to participating members of the search process.

http://umanitoba.ca/admin/governance/media/Access_and_Privacy_Policy_-_2015_06_23.pdf.

Jan 22-24, 2016: STAND Conference – Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

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Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

About the Conference

In light of the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report published in June 2015 regarding the cultural genocide of First Nations peoples, STAND is looking to reorient itself toward domestic issues related to genocide in addition to our international advocacy focus. This conference will convene STAND Canada’s national leadership on the UBC campus, hosted by our UBC Chapter, for a robust dialogue on STAND’s future in relation to genocide on this land that will engage multiple stakeholders.

The objectives for this conference are open-ended as we listen through consultations, meetings, and events in an effort to understand our responsibility as a Canadian anti-genocide advocacy organization. As a result of the topic of focus, we are excited to build relationships with external allies and local Indigenous groups that may be interested in teaching us and working with us.

For more information, please view our Conference Summary.

Get Involved with the Conference

The Conference will be held from 9am – 8pm in Vancouver on January 22, 23, and from 9am – 2pm on January 24. There is no cost for attending the Conference.

We have organized two events open to the public. Please join us for the following events:

If you are interested in attending but do not have a Facebook account or you are bringing a guest, please email us or RSVP through Eventbrite to the film screening and Open Forum. We would like to ensure that our events meet room capacity numbers.

For any questions, please email us.