Day: February 17, 2016

Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress. 10:30am–11:30am, Mar 11, 2016

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Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress

When: Friday, March 11, 2016  |  10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Where: Neville Scarfe Building, Room 310

 

k-sujathaThe Educational Administration & Leadership Program (EDAL, Department of Educational Studies), Indigenous Education, and the Faculty of Education Dean’s Office present a seminar by Professor K. Sujatha, Head, Department of Educational Administration, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi, India.

Tribes (Indigenous people) in India, who are also called Adivasis (Hindi for “original inhabitants”), constitute 8.9 percent (over 80 million) of the total population of the country and occupy the lowest levels in socio-economic development. There are more than 750 tribal groups with varied socio-cultural traditions. The Constitution of India envisages special measures for socio-economic development of tribes. Consequently both national and state governments have adopted several special policies and programmes for educational development of tribes. This presentation will cover several of these special policies and programmes — including residential schools — for the education of tribes, progress that is being made, and current issues and challenges.

Bio

Professor Sujatha holds a PhD in Educational Anthropology from Andhra University. She has been a Visiting Fellow at New England Univesity in Australia and has consulted with UNESCO, UNICEF, the British Council, the UN Development Programme, and the UN Office for Project Services. She has authored eight books in addition to research papers and articles published in national and international journals. Her specializations include education of disadvantaged groups, educational policy analysis, comparative education in developing countries, and school management.

Daryl Baldwin: toopeeliyankwi, kati myaamiaataweeyankwi: We Succeed At Speaking The Myaamia Language. 11:30am-1pm, Feb 22, 2016

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Abstract

The Myaamia language was labeled an extinct language by the mid 20th century. After 25 years of reconstruction and revitalization, the Myaamia language is spoken once again among a younger generation of tribal youth who are using language learning opportunities to reconnect to each other and their Indigenous knowledge system. It is through the creation of a holistic well-designed educational effort that cultural knowledge and language proficiency will increase over time. This talk will explore the strategies employed by the Myaamia community in their attempts to rebuild community through language and cultural education.

Daryl Baldwin, Director, Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Myaamia Center is a unique collaborative effort supported by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University in Oxford, Ohio for the purpose of advancing the language and cultural needs of the Myaamia people. Daryl received an MA in linguistics from the University of Montana. He has worked with the Myaamia people developing language and cultural materials since 1995. For an update on the projects currently under development through the Myaamia Center please visit the web site at www.myaamiacenter.org.

Location & Timing

11:30-1:00pm, Monday, February 22, 2016
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, First Nations Longhouse
1985 West Mall

Baldwin’s lecture will begin at 11:30am. A free catered lunch will follow his talk at 1pm. The lecture will be held in the Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall at the First Nations Longhouse, 1985 West Mall.

For the event poster, click here.