Month: May 2016

Job – Aboriginal Infant Development Worker, Westbank First Nation. May 13, 2016

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TITLE: Aboriginal Infant Development Worker SALARY: Commensurate with experience DEPARTMENT: Early Years – Community Services TERM: Full Time Term (4 years)

POSITION SUMMARY:

*WFN BAND MEMBER PREFERRED*

The Aboriginal Infant Development Worker is a fixed-term, grant-funded position primarily responsible for providing support and services to families with children aged 0 – 6 with a focus on birth to age 3.

 

  • Interested applicants should email an application form, cover letter, and resume by Friday, May 13, 2016.Recruitment/Training & Development Coordinator Westbank First Nation
    301-515 Hwy 97 South, Kelowna, BC V1Z 3J2 Fax: (250) 769-4377
    Email: careers@wfn.ca

Full Posting: Aboriginal Infant Dev Worker

 

Upcoming External Award Competitions at UBC

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Note that these awards are externally administered and questions should be directed to funding agencies directly.

Elizabeth Henry Scholarship for Communities and Environmental Health

The Elizabeth Henry Scholarship for Communities and Environmental Health supports graduate students working on research projects in partnership with BC communities that are addressing environmental health issues and promoting environmental sustainability through cooperative community initiatives.

Deadline: Tuesday, 10 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/elizabeth-henry-scholarship-communities-environmental-health

Robert Bertram Doctoral Research Awards

The Robert Bertram Doctoral Research Awards have been established to promote Canadian-based research on corporate governance and build Canada’s corporate governance research capacity by encouraging the next generation of young scholars.

Deadline: Sunday, 15 May 2016; ORS signature deadline is 12 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/robert-bertram-doctoral-research-awards

SRK Graduate Scholarship

SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. offers a graduate scholarship with the intent to assist students undertaking graduate studies in mining industry related areas.

Deadline: Friday, 27 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/srk-graduate-scholarship

The Pat Clifford Award for Early Career Research in Education

The Pat Clifford Award is administered by the Canadian Education Association (CEA) and intends to recognize the work of emerging researchers in education policy, practice, or theory in Canada.This award is dedicated to the memory of Pat Clifford, who was active in research and teaching practice in Canada.

Deadline: Tuesday, 31 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/pat-clifford-award-early-career-research-education

Mitacs Globalink Research Award

The Mitacs Globalink Research Award helps faculty members and students at Canadian universities build an international research network and undertake research abroad. The Research Award offers senior undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to undertake 12- to 24-week research projects supervised by professors at accredited universities in Brazil, mainland China, India, or Mexico. The award is open to all disciplines.

Deadline: Friday, 10 June 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/mitacs-globalink-research-award

Vancouver Korean-Canadian Scholarship Foundation Scholarship

The Vancouver Korean-Canadian Scholarship Foundation (VKCSF) is a charitable organization dedicated to providing scholarships to qualified students with Korean heritage or to those pursuing academic studies related to Korea. VKCSF encourages students to contribute to the well-being and prosperity of the Korean-Canadian community and the wider Canadian society.

Deadline: Wednesday, 15 June 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/vancouver-korean-canadian-scholarship-foundation-scholarship

John W. Davies Memorial Award

Two awards of $3,000 are offered by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Arctic Section in memory of John W. Davies, a former Chairman of the Section. The competition is open to any full time graduate student whose research will assist in providing solutions to problems encountered in the Arctic or in cold ocean environments.

Deadline: 29 June 2016 11:00 PM PST
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/john-w-davies-memorial-award

Norm Bromberger Research Bursary

The Norm Bromberger Research Bursary provides $2,000 each year to encourage research in the area of co-operatives and credit unions.

Deadline: Thursday, 30 June 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/norm-bromberger-research-bursary

The Kathryn Huget Leadership Award

The Kathryn Huget Leadership Award is available for students studying at the Master’s or PhD level, preferably in the areas of organizational behaviour, business administration, business and commerce, sociology, or psychology. Awarded to any individual, with preference given to female students currently in leadership roles, whose focus is to improve the business workplace for women.

Deadline: 30 June 2016 10:59 PM PST
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/kathryn-huget-leadership-award

Science & SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists

The prize is awarded annually to one young scientist for outstanding life science research for which he/she was awarded a doctoral degree in the previous two years. The topic of the entrant’s thesis research must be in one of the following categories: Cell and Molecular Biology, Genomics and Proteomics, Ecology and Environment, Translational Medicine.

Deadline: Monday, 01 August 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/science-scilifelab-prize-young-scientists

The above awards and more are linked from https://www.grad.ubc.ca/scholarships-awards-funding/award-opportunities

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

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Aaron Carapella Son Sequoyah
Courtesy Brian McDermott
“Map guy” Aaron Carapella is pictured here with his son, Sequoyah.

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

4/10/15

In the beginning, there were no lines.

Prior to 1492, North America was a vast wilderness: an expanse of rolling hills, open plains and meandering rivers. There were no state boundaries, no borders between countries and no private property.

That’s what Aaron Carapella captures in his Tribal Nations Maps, the only known maps that show what Turtle Island looked like before European contact.

“There are a lot of horrible maps out there that stereotype Native Americans or provide misinformation,” said Carapella, who lives in Stigler, Oklahoma. “We need something to combat that. We need maps that aren’t divided by modern countries and political borders, that show where tribes were and what they were called.”

The original Tribal Nations Map, released in 2012, is a poster-sized replica of the United States, minus the state lines. Roughly 590 Native nations are spread across the map, identified by their indigenous names, traditional locations and, when possible, historic images.

Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella, who is of Cherokee descent, spent 14 years researching and creating his first map. But the project began years earlier when Carapella, now 35, was a teenager exploring his own heritage and looking for a map of tribes that he could hang on his bedroom wall.

“I never really found any good maps that were comprehensive in any way,” he said. “So I thought, why don’t I make my own? I bought four poster boards, taped them together and put on all the tribes that I knew.”

The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella got serious about his project when he realized so many Native people had never seen themselves represented on a map. He traveled to 250 Native communities and contacted every cultural department in North America, he said.

“I’ve used books, military records, settler documentation and autobiographies,” he said. “On road trips, I get off the highway and visit tribal communities. Everywhere I go, I’m talking to people.”

The result was the map of the United States, of which Carapella has already sold 3,200 copies and given away an additional 900. The maps are in classrooms, cultural centers and museums across the country. They’re also in homes, on bedroom walls and in researches’ offices.

A documentarian is making a film about Carapella’s project, and Hayden-McNeil, a textbook publishing company, is printing two of the maps in an upcoming book.

But Carapella decided not to stop with a map of the United States. He created additional maps showing locations of tribes—along with their traditional names—in Canada, Alaska, Mexico and Central America. He also offers a map of the entire North American continent identifying more than 1,000 tribes—and without the “artificial boundaries” established later.

“My next map is of South America,” Carapella said. “I don’t think I’m going to stop until I’ve done all the maps in the Western Hemisphere.”

The maps are already changing public perception in places like Olympia, Washington, where the map of the entire North American continent hangs on a wall at the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College. Program coordinator Karama Blackhorn said it serves as a conversation starter and a way to help indigenous students feel welcome.

Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

“The biggest problem minority students find is they don’t have a sense of belonging; they don’t see themselves in faculty, staff or other students,” she said. “There’s no Native representation on campus except anthropological. This is a giant, visual art piece that reminds people to stop having that historical mentality.”

Blackhorn, a member of the Kahosadi tribe of Oregon, said she grew up with a map that had only 12 tribes on it. Carapella’s map is the most comprehensive representation of Native America she’s ever seen.

“My family is on the map now,” she said. “This is validating on so many levels.”

In a classroom on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, history teacher William Stearns uses the maps to help students make connections to their own heritage.

“When you see students see these maps you can see the pride in them,” he said. “They stand taller, they understand. I believe that they have a clearer picture of their importance in this country.”

Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)
Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)

In an age where few places on the planet remain uncharted, cartography may seem an antiquated craft. But for Carapella, the project is an exploration not of geography, but rather history. In essence, he’s going back in time to capture a view of the land in its pre-colonial state.

For some, the maps are happy reminders of forgotten cultures. For others, they bring up difficult aspects of history or conflicted emotions. Any response, Carapella said, is evidence that he’s doing his job.

“It’s weird how many emotions get stirred up,” he said. “They are factual maps of where our nations were and what they were called, but they spark questions. They make people think in a different way.”

Carapella’s maps are available in various sizes and range in price from $49 to $300. Buy them online here.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/10/changing-perceptions-and-making-connections-one-map-time-159925

Job – Early Years Centre Asst, Westbank First Nation. Due: May 13, 2016

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TITLE: Early Years Centre Assistant
SALARY: Commensurate with experience DEPARTMENT: Early Years – Community Services TERM: Full Time Term (4 years)

POSITION SUMMARY:

*WFN BAND MEMBER PREFERRED*

The Early Years Centre Assistant is a fixed-term, grant-funded position primarily responsible for coordinating and facilitating activities for the Westbank First Nation Early Years Centre. The position involves the development of key connections with the broader community and liaise work to provide a comprehensive array of services to clients.

Interested applicants should email an application form, cover letter, and resume by Friday, May 13, 2016.

  • Recruitment/Training & Development Coordinator Westbank First Nation
    301-515 Hwy 97 South, Kelowna, BC V1Z 3J2 Fax: (250) 769-4377
    Email: careers@wfn.ca

Full Posting: Early Years Centre Asst

 

Inner Peace? The Dalai Lama Made a Website for That

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The Dalai Lama spoke about the Atlas of Emotions study at the Wilson House on the Sisters of St. Francis’ Assisi Heights campus in Rochester, Minn. Credit Tim Gruber for The New York Times

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Dalai Lama, who tirelessly preaches inner peace while chiding people for their selfish, materialistic ways, has commissioned scientists for a lofty mission: to help turn secular audiences into more self-aware, compassionate humans.

That is, of course, no easy task. So the Dalai Lama ordered up something with a grand name to go with his grand ambitions: a comprehensive Atlas of Emotions to help the more than seven billion people on the planet navigate the morass of their feelings to attain peace and happiness.

“It is my duty to publish such work,” the Dalai Lama said.

To create this “map of the mind,” as he called it, the Dalai Lama reached out to a source Hollywood had used to plumb the workings of the human psyche.

Specifically, he commissioned his good friend Paul Ekman — a psychologist who helped advise the creators of Pixar’s “Inside Out,” an animated film set inside a girl’s head — to map out the range of human sentiments. Dr. Ekman later distilled them into the five basic emotions depicted in the movie, from anger to enjoyment.

Dr. Ekman’s daughter, Eve, also a psychologist, worked on the project as well, with the goal of producing an interactive guide to human emotions that anyone with an Internet connection could study in a quest for self-understanding, calm and constructive action.

“We have, by nature or biologically, this destructive emotion, also constructive emotion,” the Dalai Lama said. “This innerness, people should pay more attention to, from kindergarten level up to university level. This is not just for knowledge, but in order to create a happy human being. Happy family, happy community and, finally, happy humanity.”

The Dalai Lama paid Dr. Ekman at least $750,000 to develop the project, which began with a request several years ago.

Dr. Ekman recalled the Dalai Lama telling him: “When we wanted to get to the New World, we needed a map. So make a map of emotions so we can get to a calm state.”

As a first step, Dr. Ekman conducted a survey of 149 scientists (emotion scientists, neuroscientists and psychologists who are published leaders in their fields) to see where there was consensus about the nature of emotions, the moods or states they produce, and related areas.

Based on the survey, Dr. Ekman concluded that there were five broad categories of emotions — anger, fear, disgust, sadness and enjoyment — and that each had an elaborate subset of emotional states, triggers, actions and moods. He took these findings to a cartography and data visualization firm, Stamen, to depict them in a visual and, he hoped, useful way.

“If it isn’t fun, it’s a failure,” Dr. Ekman said. “It’s got to be fun for people to use.”

Photo

A diagram from the Atlas of Emotions. Credit Paul Ekman

Stamen’s founder, Eric Rodenbeck, has created data visualizations for Google, Facebook and MTV, as well as maps showing climate change and rising oceans. But he said the Atlas was the most challenging project he had worked on because it was “built around knowledge and wisdom rather than data.”

Not surprisingly, getting scientists to reach a unified understanding of human emotions was difficult.

Dacher Keltner, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, also counseled Pixar on establishing and depicting the emotional characters for “Inside Out.” He has even advised Facebook on emoticons.

Although Dr. Keltner took part in Dr. Ekman’s survey, the two are not in complete agreement on the number of core emotions. Still, Dr. Keltner said he saw the project as a good step.

“The survey questions could have allowed for more gray areas,” he said. “But it’s important to take stock of what the scientific consensus is in the field.”

Dr. Ekman emphasized that the Atlas was not a scientific work intended for peer review.

“It is a visualization for what we think has been learned from scientific studies,” he said. “It’s a transformative process, a work of explanation.”

The Dalai Lama wants to keep religion out of it.

“If we see this research work as relying on religious belief or tradition, then it automatically becomes limited,” he said. “Even if you pray to God, pray to Buddha, emotionally, very nice, very good. But every problem, we have created. So I think even God or Buddha cannot do much.”

The Dalai Lama said he hoped the Atlas could be a tool for cultivating good in the world by defeating the bad within us.

“Ultimately, our emotion is the real troublemaker,” he said. “We have to know the nature of that enemy.”

Read More…

Reference:
New York Times. Inner Peace? The Dalai Lama Made a Website for That
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/07/world/dalai-lama-website-atlas-of-emotions.html?_r=0 Retrieved on May 6, 2016.

Art Exhibition Opening at MOA: Unceded Territories by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun. 7-9pm, May 10, 2016

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Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun:
Unceded Territories

Tuesday, May 10, 7-9 pm. Free admission. Cash bar.

We invite you to join us for the opening party for our new exhibition, Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories.

Vancouver artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish and Okanagan descent, is showcased in this provocative exhibition of works that confront the colonialist suppression of First Nations peoples and the ongoing struggle for Indigenous rights to lands, resources and sovereignty. Learn more.

No RSVP required. Opening remarks will be given at 7:15 pm by MOA Director Anthony Shelton and Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun. A full-colour publication accompanying the exhibition will be available for purchase from the MOA Shop.

Public Scholars Initiative, Due: May 16, 2016

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Deadline

Monday, 16 May 2016

Annual Value

Up to $10,000

Citizenship

Canadian
Permanent Resident
International

Degree Level

Doctoral

This award is part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, which intends to build connections, community, and capacity for doctoral students who are interested in explicitly linking their doctoral work to an arena of public benefit and integrating broader and more career-relevant forms of scholarship into their doctoral education process.

Up to $10,000 per student is available to support innovative/collaborative scholarship which the student would otherwise be unable to pursue. Funding can be used for:

  • Student stipend, if the student’s current funding source would not allow the alternative project(s)
  • A research allowance (including allowance for professional development or travel relevant to the scholarly work)

Funding is available for up to 30 new students in 2016-17. Students may be eligible for renewal for a second year (pending new PSI funding).

Listen to the PSI Info Session, recorded on March 9, 2016: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/ubc-public-scholars-award

New Relationship Trust 2016-2017 Scholarships & Bursaries

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New Relationship Trust Announces 2016-2017 Scholarships & Bursaries! 

Vancouver, BC 
– The New Relationship Trust Foundation (NRT Foundation) in partnership with the New Relationship Trust (NRT) is pleased to announce that Scholarships and Bursaries for 2016-2017 are now available to First Nations students in British Columbia (BC)!  
 
NRT, the founding partner of the NRT Foundation, has committed $600,000 this year to provide Scholarships of $20,000 for Doctorates, $10,000 for Masters, $5,000 for Bachelors and $2,000 for Certificates, Diplomas, Associates Degrees and Trades Bursaries for BC First Nations students.  An additional $494,500 has already been secured from our funding partners that include Aboriginal Energy Solutions Inc., BC Hydro, Canfor, Chief Joe Mathias Foundation, Drillwell Enterprises, First Nations Health Authority, Peace Hills Trust, and Scotiabank.


 
Scholarships
Open Date
Close Date
Amount
Undergraduate
April 19
June 9th
$5,000
Master
April 19
June 9th
$10,000
Doctorate
April 19
June 9th
$20,000


Bursaries
Open Date
Close Date
Amount
Certificates,
Diplomas, Associates Degrees,
Trades
1st call : April 19
2nd call : August 11
1st call : June 16
2nd call : Sept 15
$2,000


In 2006, the BC Government worked with First Nations leadership to create NRT, and gave $100 million to NRT to support capacity building initiatives, which include First Nations Scholarships and Bursaries.  Since 2010, 1,469 Scholarship and Bursary awards totalling over $6.8 million have been given to students from First Nations in BC.
 
The NRT Foundation was created to ensure First Nations education awards continue in perpetuity. “The goal of the NRT Foundation is to create a $30 million endowment that will allow us to be self-sustaining so that students have funding options to turn to for generations.  We always hear that post-secondary education of Indigenous people is vital – we have taken on the challenge and we are fully committed to supporting our families and to strengthening our communities,” explains Judith Sayers, Chair of the NRT Foundation.
 
Eliminating financial barriers to post-secondary education will enable more First Nations students to embark on successful academic journeys,” said NRT CEO, Cliff Fregin. “Improving education outcomes for First Nations students will not only help them achieve their life goals and present them with greater employment opportunities, these students are also helping to strengthen First Nations communities and British Columbia as well.
 
REMINDER – on Thursday, July 28, 2016, the 6th Annual NRT Foundation Charity Golf Tournament will take place at the UBC Golf Course in Vancouver. To sign up, go to NRT Golf website – we hope to see you there!!
 
For more information, please contact:

Matt Cook-Contos, Senior Project Officer
Email: mcookcontois@nrtf.ca

 

Nooksack Tribe fires judge handling disenrollment case

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Judge says she was told to take a drug test, then fired ‘without cause’

Chairman says judge waived tribe’s sovereign immunity without hearing

Temporary judge approved, search to start for someone to fill position

Indigenous Education teaching positions (2) at UBC

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Please see these 2 job postings in Indigenous Education at The University of British Columbia. The first one is re-advertised with new deadline date of May 18, 2016 and the second one is May 9, 2016.