Day: May 9, 2016

Job – Aboriginal Infant Development Worker, Westbank First Nation. May 13, 2016

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TITLE: Aboriginal Infant Development Worker SALARY: Commensurate with experience DEPARTMENT: Early Years – Community Services TERM: Full Time Term (4 years)

POSITION SUMMARY:

*WFN BAND MEMBER PREFERRED*

The Aboriginal Infant Development Worker is a fixed-term, grant-funded position primarily responsible for providing support and services to families with children aged 0 – 6 with a focus on birth to age 3.

 

  • Interested applicants should email an application form, cover letter, and resume by Friday, May 13, 2016.Recruitment/Training & Development Coordinator Westbank First Nation
    301-515 Hwy 97 South, Kelowna, BC V1Z 3J2 Fax: (250) 769-4377
    Email: careers@wfn.ca

Full Posting: Aboriginal Infant Dev Worker

 

Upcoming External Award Competitions at UBC

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Note that these awards are externally administered and questions should be directed to funding agencies directly.

Elizabeth Henry Scholarship for Communities and Environmental Health

The Elizabeth Henry Scholarship for Communities and Environmental Health supports graduate students working on research projects in partnership with BC communities that are addressing environmental health issues and promoting environmental sustainability through cooperative community initiatives.

Deadline: Tuesday, 10 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/elizabeth-henry-scholarship-communities-environmental-health

Robert Bertram Doctoral Research Awards

The Robert Bertram Doctoral Research Awards have been established to promote Canadian-based research on corporate governance and build Canada’s corporate governance research capacity by encouraging the next generation of young scholars.

Deadline: Sunday, 15 May 2016; ORS signature deadline is 12 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/robert-bertram-doctoral-research-awards

SRK Graduate Scholarship

SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. offers a graduate scholarship with the intent to assist students undertaking graduate studies in mining industry related areas.

Deadline: Friday, 27 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/srk-graduate-scholarship

The Pat Clifford Award for Early Career Research in Education

The Pat Clifford Award is administered by the Canadian Education Association (CEA) and intends to recognize the work of emerging researchers in education policy, practice, or theory in Canada.This award is dedicated to the memory of Pat Clifford, who was active in research and teaching practice in Canada.

Deadline: Tuesday, 31 May 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/pat-clifford-award-early-career-research-education

Mitacs Globalink Research Award

The Mitacs Globalink Research Award helps faculty members and students at Canadian universities build an international research network and undertake research abroad. The Research Award offers senior undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to undertake 12- to 24-week research projects supervised by professors at accredited universities in Brazil, mainland China, India, or Mexico. The award is open to all disciplines.

Deadline: Friday, 10 June 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/mitacs-globalink-research-award

Vancouver Korean-Canadian Scholarship Foundation Scholarship

The Vancouver Korean-Canadian Scholarship Foundation (VKCSF) is a charitable organization dedicated to providing scholarships to qualified students with Korean heritage or to those pursuing academic studies related to Korea. VKCSF encourages students to contribute to the well-being and prosperity of the Korean-Canadian community and the wider Canadian society.

Deadline: Wednesday, 15 June 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/vancouver-korean-canadian-scholarship-foundation-scholarship

John W. Davies Memorial Award

Two awards of $3,000 are offered by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Arctic Section in memory of John W. Davies, a former Chairman of the Section. The competition is open to any full time graduate student whose research will assist in providing solutions to problems encountered in the Arctic or in cold ocean environments.

Deadline: 29 June 2016 11:00 PM PST
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/john-w-davies-memorial-award

Norm Bromberger Research Bursary

The Norm Bromberger Research Bursary provides $2,000 each year to encourage research in the area of co-operatives and credit unions.

Deadline: Thursday, 30 June 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/norm-bromberger-research-bursary

The Kathryn Huget Leadership Award

The Kathryn Huget Leadership Award is available for students studying at the Master’s or PhD level, preferably in the areas of organizational behaviour, business administration, business and commerce, sociology, or psychology. Awarded to any individual, with preference given to female students currently in leadership roles, whose focus is to improve the business workplace for women.

Deadline: 30 June 2016 10:59 PM PST
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/kathryn-huget-leadership-award

Science & SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists

The prize is awarded annually to one young scientist for outstanding life science research for which he/she was awarded a doctoral degree in the previous two years. The topic of the entrant’s thesis research must be in one of the following categories: Cell and Molecular Biology, Genomics and Proteomics, Ecology and Environment, Translational Medicine.

Deadline: Monday, 01 August 2016
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/science-scilifelab-prize-young-scientists

The above awards and more are linked from https://www.grad.ubc.ca/scholarships-awards-funding/award-opportunities

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

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Aaron Carapella Son Sequoyah
Courtesy Brian McDermott
“Map guy” Aaron Carapella is pictured here with his son, Sequoyah.

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

4/10/15

In the beginning, there were no lines.

Prior to 1492, North America was a vast wilderness: an expanse of rolling hills, open plains and meandering rivers. There were no state boundaries, no borders between countries and no private property.

That’s what Aaron Carapella captures in his Tribal Nations Maps, the only known maps that show what Turtle Island looked like before European contact.

“There are a lot of horrible maps out there that stereotype Native Americans or provide misinformation,” said Carapella, who lives in Stigler, Oklahoma. “We need something to combat that. We need maps that aren’t divided by modern countries and political borders, that show where tribes were and what they were called.”

The original Tribal Nations Map, released in 2012, is a poster-sized replica of the United States, minus the state lines. Roughly 590 Native nations are spread across the map, identified by their indigenous names, traditional locations and, when possible, historic images.

Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella, who is of Cherokee descent, spent 14 years researching and creating his first map. But the project began years earlier when Carapella, now 35, was a teenager exploring his own heritage and looking for a map of tribes that he could hang on his bedroom wall.

“I never really found any good maps that were comprehensive in any way,” he said. “So I thought, why don’t I make my own? I bought four poster boards, taped them together and put on all the tribes that I knew.”

The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella got serious about his project when he realized so many Native people had never seen themselves represented on a map. He traveled to 250 Native communities and contacted every cultural department in North America, he said.

“I’ve used books, military records, settler documentation and autobiographies,” he said. “On road trips, I get off the highway and visit tribal communities. Everywhere I go, I’m talking to people.”

The result was the map of the United States, of which Carapella has already sold 3,200 copies and given away an additional 900. The maps are in classrooms, cultural centers and museums across the country. They’re also in homes, on bedroom walls and in researches’ offices.

A documentarian is making a film about Carapella’s project, and Hayden-McNeil, a textbook publishing company, is printing two of the maps in an upcoming book.

But Carapella decided not to stop with a map of the United States. He created additional maps showing locations of tribes—along with their traditional names—in Canada, Alaska, Mexico and Central America. He also offers a map of the entire North American continent identifying more than 1,000 tribes—and without the “artificial boundaries” established later.

“My next map is of South America,” Carapella said. “I don’t think I’m going to stop until I’ve done all the maps in the Western Hemisphere.”

The maps are already changing public perception in places like Olympia, Washington, where the map of the entire North American continent hangs on a wall at the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College. Program coordinator Karama Blackhorn said it serves as a conversation starter and a way to help indigenous students feel welcome.

Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

“The biggest problem minority students find is they don’t have a sense of belonging; they don’t see themselves in faculty, staff or other students,” she said. “There’s no Native representation on campus except anthropological. This is a giant, visual art piece that reminds people to stop having that historical mentality.”

Blackhorn, a member of the Kahosadi tribe of Oregon, said she grew up with a map that had only 12 tribes on it. Carapella’s map is the most comprehensive representation of Native America she’s ever seen.

“My family is on the map now,” she said. “This is validating on so many levels.”

In a classroom on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, history teacher William Stearns uses the maps to help students make connections to their own heritage.

“When you see students see these maps you can see the pride in them,” he said. “They stand taller, they understand. I believe that they have a clearer picture of their importance in this country.”

Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)
Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)

In an age where few places on the planet remain uncharted, cartography may seem an antiquated craft. But for Carapella, the project is an exploration not of geography, but rather history. In essence, he’s going back in time to capture a view of the land in its pre-colonial state.

For some, the maps are happy reminders of forgotten cultures. For others, they bring up difficult aspects of history or conflicted emotions. Any response, Carapella said, is evidence that he’s doing his job.

“It’s weird how many emotions get stirred up,” he said. “They are factual maps of where our nations were and what they were called, but they spark questions. They make people think in a different way.”

Carapella’s maps are available in various sizes and range in price from $49 to $300. Buy them online here.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/10/changing-perceptions-and-making-connections-one-map-time-159925

Job – Early Years Centre Asst, Westbank First Nation. Due: May 13, 2016

Posted on Updated on

TITLE: Early Years Centre Assistant
SALARY: Commensurate with experience DEPARTMENT: Early Years – Community Services TERM: Full Time Term (4 years)

POSITION SUMMARY:

*WFN BAND MEMBER PREFERRED*

The Early Years Centre Assistant is a fixed-term, grant-funded position primarily responsible for coordinating and facilitating activities for the Westbank First Nation Early Years Centre. The position involves the development of key connections with the broader community and liaise work to provide a comprehensive array of services to clients.

Interested applicants should email an application form, cover letter, and resume by Friday, May 13, 2016.

  • Recruitment/Training & Development Coordinator Westbank First Nation
    301-515 Hwy 97 South, Kelowna, BC V1Z 3J2 Fax: (250) 769-4377
    Email: careers@wfn.ca

Full Posting: Early Years Centre Asst