Day: June 13, 2016

[in education] CASIE Guest-Edited Special Issue on Indigenous Education

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[in education] has just published its latest issue at
http://ineducation.ca/ineducation. This is a CASIE Guest-Edited Special
Issue on Indigenous Education. We invite you to review the Table of Contents
here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Patrick Lewis, Editor-in-Chief
Shuana Niessen, Managing Editor, in education

in education
Vol 22, No 1 (2016): Spring 2016 [Indigenous Education] in education
Table of Contents
http://ineducation.ca/ineducation/issue/view/26

Editorial
——–

Editorial (1)
Frank Deer

Articles
——–

Culturally Relevant Physical Education: Educative Conversations with
Mi’kmaw Elders and Community Leaders (2-21)
Daniel B. Robinson,     Joe Barrett,    Ingrid Robinson
The Community Strength Model: A Proposal to Invest in Existing Aboriginal
Intellectual Capital (22-41)
Michelle J. Eady
Digital Technology Innovations in Education in Remote First Nations (42-60)
Brian Beaton,   Penny Carpenter
Culture in Schooling in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (61-76)
Paul Berger,    Jennifer Johnston,      Melissa Oskineegish
Teacher Attrition in a Northern Ontario Remote First Nation: A Narrative
Re-Storying (77-90)
Dawn Burleigh
Filling in the Gaps: Lessons Learned From Preservice Teachers’
Partnerships With First Nations Students (91-109)
Lynne V. Wiltse
An Investigation of the Role of Legends and Storytelling in Early Childhood
Practices in a Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) Early Childhood Facility (110-126)
Sandra Deer
Fostering Remembrance and Reconciliation Through an Arts-Based Response
(127-147)
Jenny Kay Dupuis,       Kristen Ferguson
Kina’muanej Knjanjiji’naq mut ntakotmnew tli’lnu’ltik (In the
Foreign Language, Let us Teach our Children not to be Ashamed of Being
Mi’kmaq) (148-160)
Ashley Julian,  Ida Denny
Aboriginal Ways of Knowing and Learning, 21st Century Learners, and STEM
Success (161-172)
Michelle M. Hogue

________________________________________________________________________
in education
http://ineducation.ca

Hokule’a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

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The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world.

The Hokule’a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world.

Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of ‘Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society

She sails by the memory of the stars.

Her bones are lashed together with 6 miles of rope. Her twin wooden masts are lowered and outstretched only by the power of muscled arms. And once fully extended, the red, V-shaped sails announce who she is.

She is the Hokule’a, Hawaii’s famous voyaging canoe, built in the double-hulled style used by Polynesian navigators thousands of years ago to cross the Pacific.

Now, she’s on a journey to make history, traversing the globe by wayfinding — an ancient Polynesian skill that requires memorizing hundreds of stars and where they rise and set on the ocean horizon. She has already crossed 26,000 miles of ocean and still has a year left to go.

“As a navigator, your job is to look at the shape of the ocean,” said Nainoa Thompson, the architect of the worldwide tour and president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society. “You have to be on your feet, and to be able to feel one wave when it comes through from one foot to another. You only know where you are by memorizing where you come from.”

Kala Tanaka marks "stays" at the front of the canoe so they can go back in the same place after the mast is taken down to fit under the George Washington Bridge. The garlands of ti leaves, a Hawaiian tradition, were placed on the Hokule'a by well-wishers.

Kala Tanaka marks “stays” at the front of the canoe so they can go back in the same place after the mast is taken down to fit under the George Washington Bridge. The garlands of ti leaves, a Hawaiian tradition, were placed on the Hokule’a by well-wishers.

Claire Harbage/NPR

Onboard this East Coast leg is a 12-member crew, a mix of veteran native Hawaiian navigators and young, lean apprentices who have taken time off their jobs as pro surfers, educators and executives for the chance of a lifetime: sailing for weeks on a 61-foot catamaran-style canoe in the open ocean. And the promise of returning with a stronger sense of themselves.

Many are part Native Hawaiian and were inspired to connect to their roots. With Hokule’a (ho-koo-lay-ah), they want to spread a message about what the world could learn from island people about how to live sustainably and care for the ocean.

“She has the ability to transform,” said Na’alehu Anthony, 36, who is navigating this leg of the trip but also serves as chief executive of ‘Oiwi TV, a Native Hawaiian television company.

“This floating island is a representation of the values people should have for the islands we all live in — whether that’s Hawaii, the U.S. mainland or Tangier Island. It’s been really interesting to see how people see themselves in that message. They get it.”

Behind the canvas on both sides of the boat are the small, 6-foot “holes,” or cubbies, which are the sleeping quarters for crew members. They have a sleeping bag, clothes and a few personal effects for the journey. Underneath the sleeping mat is storage space for food, water and other supplies.

Claire Harbage/NPR


Hokule’a’s trip around the world is ambitious. But it’s nothing compared with her maiden voyage. That was a moonshot.

Forty years ago, a group of Native Hawaiians and anthropologists built the Hokule’a to revive the ancient art of Polynesian wayfinding, which had been forgotten.

No one knew how to build a canoe in the style of their ancestors, whose oral stories spoke of setting forth across vast oceans like astronauts of their day, exploring an ocean that is bigger than Russia.

At the time, no one in Hawaii knew how to build a voyaging canoe — none had existed for at least 600 years. No one in Hawaii knew how to navigate by the stars. But they found a man named Mau Piailug in Micronesia, a wayfinder on a tiny island who agreed to teach them how to sail using cues from nature — not only by watching the stars, but by noticing the swells and bird species, and the smallest of details, like shifts in the wind pressing against their bodies.

Left: Apprentice navigator Kala Tanaka (right) talks to students from the Alexandria Seaport Foundation about how the boat is navigated, during one of many educational tours offered while the boat is in port. Right: Na'alehu Anthony took leave from his job as chief executive of a television company to train for and join the voyage.

Left: Apprentice navigator Kala Tanaka (right) talks to students from the Alexandria Seaport Foundation about how the boat is navigated, during one of many educational tours offered while the boat is in port. Right: Na’alehu Anthony took leave from his job as chief executive of a television company to train for and join the voyage.

Claire Harbage/NPR

In 1976, a group of Native Hawaiians and anthropologists, and Mau, bet their lives that they could sail from Hawaii to Tahiti without any modern-day navigational equipment. They wanted to prove a theory that the original people who settled the islands of Hawaii did so not by accident, but with the intention of finding the islands and settling there.

And when the team safely reached its destination, after more than a month at sea, its triumph sparked a revival of Hawaiian identity and culture. Soon after, Native Hawaiians demanded that the state begin teaching the Hawaiian language in schools again. A group occupied the uninhabited island of Kaho’olawe, in protest of the U.S. Navy’s use of it as a target for bombing practice.

“There was a time when the Hawaiian culture wasn’t valued,” said Kalepa Baybayan, who was part of that first generation of crew members aboard the Hokule’a. “In the ’70s, it all changed.”

Na’alehu Anthony’s hand rests over a small black mark on the rail of the boat. Marks like this create a grid on the entire boat to help orient the navigator in the direction which they are heading.

Claire Harbage/NPR

The Hokule’a gave the Native Hawaiian people an identity; it became a symbol of hope for the survival of their culture.

Now they call Hokule’a the mother ship because she spawned a new generation. Since that 1976 voyage, 25 more deep-sea-voyaging canoes have been birthed across 11 countries. More than 180 crew members have taken a turn aboard the Hokule’a on its global trip. More impressive is the number who trained, applied but for whom there was no room: 4,000.

It’s her mana, or spirit, as well as her history, that attracts people, crew members say. On her first voyage, to Tahiti, she was greeted by a crowd of 17,000 who walked into the water with their clothes on to see her; to touch her; and to drape leis around the necks of men who were onboard. And when she arrived along the shores of Alexandria, Va., last week, visitors waited as long as an hour for the chance to step onboard and touch her bow.

Modern updates include this rope rather than the coconut fiber that was used on Hawaiian canoes in the past. The small flag (right) that flutters above the canvas is one tool that navigators use when they can't see the stars. Knowing the direction the wind is blowing and watching the waves helps them to understand their direction when it is cloudy.

Modern updates include this rope rather than the coconut fiber that was used on Hawaiian canoes in the past. The small flag (right) that flutters above the canvas is one tool that navigators use when they can’t see the stars. Knowing the direction the wind is blowing and watching the waves helps them to understand their direction when it is cloudy.

Claire Harbage/NPR

The navigator’s place is at the back corner of the Hokule’a, standing at all times with feet wide apart on the deck.

“There’s the motion that the canoe makes as it climbs up over the wave,” said Baybayan. “And you have to internalize that as the rhythm, the pulse of the canoe. And when that rhythm changes, either you’ve steered off course or the conditions have changed.”

When you’re doing it for the first time, you’re double-guessing yourself, he said. But once you make your first landfall, you understand that the process you went through got you there.

“Once you’re in the zone, you’ve reached a different plateau of metaphysical thinking,” he said. “It just builds confidence in yourself. You start to understand nature.”

The mast must come down in the next part of the journey to get past the bridges on the Potomac River on the way to the Washington, D.C., stop. The lei at the very top is color coded; traditionally each captain had his own color so the boats could recognize who was on it from afar.

The mast must come down in the next part of the journey to get past the bridges on the Potomac River on the way to the Washington, D.C., stop. The lei at the very top is color coded; traditionally each captain had his own color so the boats could recognize who was on it from afar.

Claire Harbage/NPR

Being on a 61-foot vessel with no engine in the middle of the ocean is, indeed, as tough as it might seem. All crew members train for weeks to prepare their bodies mentally and physically and must take courses on celestial navigation to prepare for the voyage.

Once onboard, crew members are assigned a 6-foot-long plywood plank that runs along the inside of one of the boat’s two hulls, which are connected by boards that serve as Hokule’a’s deck. Most put a waterproof foam pad on top, like the kind you float on in a swimming pool.

The rookies get a “hole,” or 6-foot sleeping spot in the front of the canoe, where it’s wettest and coldest. The elder crew members get the back where it’s warmer and dry. They all sleep head-to-toe, in a line, inside the twin canoe hulls.

“It’s like a one-man tent, but like, elongated, ” said Kala Tanaka, 34, who sleeps in the front while her father, one of the most seasoned navigators, sleeps in the back. “You have situations where it’s so rough that the water splashes in between the canvas [overhead] and it gets wet. But I like to think of this as exciting!”

Ki'i, statues that help guide the vessel, are on either side of the boat. Only the female (right) has eyes because she sees the way while the male counterpart stands guard.

Ki’i, statues that help guide the vessel, are on either side of the boat. Only the female (right) has eyes because she sees the way while the male counterpart stands guard.

Claire Harbage/NPR

Aside from a canvas over their head, the crew members are exposed to the wet cold, the relentless sun or rain. They take saltwater showers. The sunscreen onboard is gallon-size, with a pump on top. The navigator and his or her apprentices are expected to remain awake for 18 to 22 hours a day, keeping an eye on the conditions to ensure they stay the course.

But their rewards, of course, are many. They are counted in mahi-mahi, which the cook prepares sashimi-style, and in the sightings of whales, penguins and sunrises that they will never forget.


This leg of Hokule’a’s journey is moving slowly; she’s her most graceful out in the open ocean.

On this trip, she has braved new challenges of the mid-Atlantic: She took on unexpected whipping winds while sidestepping the onbeat of Navy and fishing boat traffic up the Chesapeake Bay to Alexandria, Va. Then she had to limbo under a series of concrete bridges up the Potomac River to Washington, D.C.

The Hokule’a has traveled 26,000 miles to deliver a message that, in typical fashion of this city, is often calculated through a political lens. Her message is Malama Honua.In Hawaiian, it means taking care of Island Earth.

“Not everyone believes in climate change, but we do,” said Thompson, one of the architects of the worldwide tour. “We’re islanders; we see it. We come from small islands in the Pacific who have nothing to do with [causing] climate change but we are the ones who will suffer the most, first.”

The Voyage Of Hokule’a, Beginning And Ending In Hawaii

Map of the canoe trip's path

Hokule’a left Hawaii in 2013 and headed west across the South Pacific and across Australia, Indonesia, the Indian Ocean and down around Cape of Good Hope in South Africa. Then, she crossed the Atlantic to Brazil and headed north. At each stop, she has been greeted by first-nation people and like-minded organizations that want to create a sense of urgency about climate change and keeping the oceans clean.

In that cause, the Hokule’a has attracted some high-profile supporters. Before setting sail three years ago, the Dalai Lama blessed her and, on a stop in Samoa in 2014, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon came aboard in a show of support.

Kalepa Baybayan (right) and his daughter Kala Tanaka. Kalepa is training Kala as an apprentice navigator.

Kalepa Baybayan (right) and his daughter Kala Tanaka. Kalepa is training Kala as an apprentice navigator.

 

When Ban came aboard the Hokule’a, he brought her a gift of a message in a bottle: a handwritten note pledging that the top environmental issue was to protect the world’s oceans and a commitment to take action. Thompson said Hokule’a has been collecting other pledges from around the world and added 40 more messages to the bottle. He plans to return it to the secretary-general at the United Nations next week for World Oceans Day.

For 40 years, Thompson’s life has been tied to the Hokule’a. Now, she is reaching middle age and, at age 63, he has nearly passed it. This trip is a bookend for him, but not likely for her.

“This canoe is a school that’s about relearning the genius of our ancestors, and about our reconnection to our ocean,” said Thompson. “This voyage is not my vision. It’s that of my teachers. I’m just a bridge between between them and” — he points to his young crew — “them.”

After New York, the Hokule’a will attempt to make it as far north as Nova Scotia, which, at 50 degrees north of the equator, would mark the northernmost point she has ever sailed. After that point, though, she will turn around. And every minute will be that much closer to returning home.

Hokule’a will go up the St. Lawrence to the Great Lakes, then turn back down the East Coast and across the Panama Canal where she will return to her ocean, the Pacific.

Thompson, Baybayan and the other elder crew members made a deal that this would be their last voyage. Anyone over age 32 will have to come off the boat as Hokule’a re-enters Polynesia at the last stop before home, in Rapa Nui. There, a new generation of wayfinders will come onboard and decide where she goes next.

Hokule'a stops in Alexandria, Va., on the way up the Potomac River to Washington, D.C.

Hokule’a stops in Alexandria, Va., on the way up the Potomac River to Washington, D.C.

Claire Harbage/NPR

Reporter Adam Cole contributed to this report. @sarakgoo @cadamole

 

Reference: NPR. 2016, June 13. Hokule’a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars. Retrieved from: http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2016/05/27/479468130/hokulea-the-hawaiian-canoe-traveling-the-world-by-a-map-of-the-stars

CBC’s missing and murdered Indigenous women website wins top Canadian Association of Journalists award

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‘This was and remains an important story to tell,’ says CBC News head

CBC News Posted: May 29, 2016 12:51 AM ET Last Updated: May 29, 2016 12:13 PM ET

Duncan McCue, Karin Wells, Nick Purdon, Diana Swain, Natalie Clancy and Margaret Evans were among the CBC News journalists who took home CAJ awards on Saturday night.

Duncan McCue, Karin Wells, Nick Purdon, Diana Swain, Natalie Clancy and Margaret Evans were among the CBC News journalists who took home CAJ awards on Saturday night. (Brodie Fenlon/CBC)

CBC News has won the top prize for investigative journalism awarded by the Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ) for its “Missing & Murdered: Unsolved cases of Indigenous women and girls” website.

The Don McGillivray Award was presented to journalists from CBC’s Aboriginal news unit and other colleagues who helped develop the project at the CAJ awards gala on Saturday night in Edmonton. The website also won the Online Media category earlier in the evening.

“In a year when Canada’s national media finally awoke to the tragedies of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, the work by our national public broadcaster set the standard,” the CAJ said in a news release.

Duncan McCue CAJ awards

The CBC’s Duncan McCue accepted the CAJ Online Media award Saturday on behalf of the team that created a website profiling more than 250 unsolved cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. The website later won the top investigative award of the night. (Brodie Fenlon/CBC)

“The elements of the CBC’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women website … told the stories of those affected in an impactful way and, somewhat sadly, led to the identification of even more Indigenous women as missing or murdered.”

More than 250 unsolved cases, confirmed by CBC journalists, have been profiled on the website.

Coverage of missing and murdered Indigenous women also garnered an award in the Open Media category for the Toronto Star.

CBC won seven CAJ awards on Saturday for radio, television and online coverage. Other winners included CTV, The Globe and Mail, The Canadian Press, Maclean’s, APTN and The Brandon Sun.

“It is a great honour for CBC News to be recognized with these CAJ awards which represents work from across our services,” said Jennifer McGuire, general manager and editor in chief of CBC News. “It is particularly gratifying to see our investigative digital project Missing and Murdered Women receive the top investigative award.

“This work represents what public service journalism does the best. We challenge ourselves to be editorial leaders and to bring light to issues Canadians need to see and understand. This was and remains an important story to tell. My thanks to the finest team of journalists anywhere.”

CBC winners at the CAJ awards:

Don McGillivray investigative award and Online Media award

“Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls” — Cate Friesen, Cecil Rosner, Connie Walker, Duncan McCue, Tiar Wilson, Kimberly Ivany, Martha Troian, Chantelle Bellrichard, Joanne Levasseur, Teghan Beaudette, Kristy Hoffman, Donna Lee, Tara Lindemann, William Wolfe-Wylie, Richard Grasley, Michael Leschart, Michael Pereira

Open broadcast feature award

“In the presence of a spoon” — Karin Wells, CBC Radio The Sunday Edition

Community broadcast award

“Real estate seminars exposed” — Natalie Clancy and Paisley Woodward, CBC News Vancouver

CAJ/Marketwired data journalism award

“Campus sexual assaults: The fight to get the real picture” —  Diana Swain, Timothy Sawa and Lori Ward, CBC News Investigative Unit, The National

Daily excellence award

“Paris Mourns” — Margaret Evans, CBC Radio The World This Weekend

Read More…

 

Upcoming Doctoral Defense

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FRIDAY, 17 JUNE 2016 – 12:30PM – ROOM 200

Michael Paul Taylor
Department: English
Writing in Brotherhood: Reconstituting Indigenous Citizenship, Nationhood, and Relationships at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

TUESDAY, 28 JUNE 2016 – 12:30PM – ROOM 200

Lara Shelley Rosenoff Gauvin
Department: Anthropology
“The Land Grows People”: Indigenous Knowledge and Social Repairing in Rural Post-Conflict Northern Uganda

Call for Participants – Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

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Call for Participants

Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

Seeking people to participate in a Vancouver-area research project on Indigenous world view, Place-based education and the practice of sustainability. This is for a research study conducted by Celia Brauer, a Graduate Student in Socio-cultural Anthropology at the University of British Columbia.

Participants must be available: Aug 2016 – Nov 2016 for 5, 5 hour Sessions, on weekend afternoons.

Plus: pre-and post-interview sessions of about 2 hours.

Participants must be 19 years or over and able-bodied. They should be interested in the subject matter and follow the whole course of educational sessions, plus all the interviews: approx. 25 hours total.

Contact Information: Co-Investigator: Celia Brauer: celiabrauer@alumni.ubc.ca

 

Faculty of Education Vancouver Summer Program – Employment and Volunteer Opportunities. Due: June 17, 2016

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The Faculty of Education will be running three packages (LLED, ECPS, and Early Childhood Education) as part of the Vancouver Summer Program. PDCE is supporting the administration of this program and we are looking to hire 2 Cultural Exchange Student Ambassadors and 10-15 Cultural Exchange Volunteers.

Further information: http://pdce.educ.ubc.ca/vancouver-summer-program

Cultural Exchange Student Ambassadors will support the Vancouver Summer Program. They will assist in the planning and facilitation of orientation and social activities for visiting students on behalf of the Faculty of Education, help students orient and adapt to studies at UBC, and provide a supportive atmosphere for students while they are in Vancouver. The incumbent will work closely with the Cultural Coordinator and the Professional Development & Community Engagement (PDCE) unit within the UBC Faculty of Education. The position reports directly to the Manager of Professional Programs in PDCE.

Duties & Responsibilities: Assisting with the planning and facilitation of orientation and social activities. Assist with airport pick-up and residence check-in when students arrive (July 14-17). Attend and facilitate Orientation (July 18 all day), and evening and weekend social activities. In conjunction with the Cultural Coordinator, liaise with other faculties and external units including catering services, entertainment venues, transportation companies, and building facility managers. Assist with the development of a template for future program implementation.

Wage: $22/hour

Deadline: June 17, 2016

Apply: Submit cover letter and résumé to Andrea Webb andrea.webb@ubc.ca or in person to PDCE office

Cultural Exchange Volunteers will be working closely with the Faculty of Education’s Cultural Exchange Students Ambassadors and the Cultural Coordinator to provide visiting students with a fun, safe, supportive, and meaningful exchange experience.  Cultural Exchange Volunteers will engage with VSP students by encouraging participation in a range of social and cultural activities, and supporting them throughout their orientation and transition to UBC and Vancouver.

Duties & Responsibilities: Attend a mandatory orientation and training session, attend and assist with welcoming activities including but not limited to residence check in, campus tours, city tours, and orientations events, attend and engage VSP students at various social and cultural events on evenings, weekends, and some weekdays, assist the VSP staff in facilitating events.

Hours per week: 5 – 15

Apply: email cover letter, résumé, and unofficial transcript addressed to Renae Roles; r.roles@alumni.ubc.ca

 

Part Time Project Lead, Post-Doc Fellow Opportunity, Health professions/Education Program Development

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Part Time Post-Doc Fellow Opportunity

A postdoctoral position as Project Lead is available for recent graduates with interest in health professions educational program development. The position is funded through a TLEF grant for the development of the formative assessment program for the new Undergraduate Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. The position will be a 0.6 FTE and will last until the end of March 2017, with a potential for a second-year reappointment.

The Project Lead will: provide project coordination; liaise with the course development teams to finalize the blueprint for the formative assessment program; provide direction and supervision to project assistants and summer students on formative assessment tools development, and plan, implement and monitor the evaluation activities. The educational scholarship and dissemination opportunities associated with this work is also an important aspect of the Project Lead role.

Apply to: George Pachev at george.pachev@ubc.ca

Job – Musqueam Indian Band: Musqueam Historical Timeline Project Assistant. June 17, 2016

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The Musqueam Indian Band (MIB) and the University of British Columbia – Vancouver Campus (UBC) are seeking a motivated UBC student to work as a Musqueam Historical Timeline Project Assistant. The Project Assistant will play a key role in the development and delivery of the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) grant “Developing a UBC-Aboriginal Timeline with Musqueam content – Time and Place at UBC: Our Histories and Relations” (More information). As part of the TLEF project team, comprising partners from MIB and UBC, the Project Assistant will work to enhance the Time and Place at UBC: Our Histories and Relations (http://timeandplace.ubc.ca ) digital timeline by creating a new line with the history of the Musqueam Nation, including the community’s relationship with UBC.

Employment date: late June 2016 – April 2017, requiring an average of 10 – 12 hours/week

Application deadline: June 17, 2016 at 4:00PM

Apply with résumé and cover letter to: Musqueam Indian Band, Human Resources, 6735 Salish Drive, Vancouver, BC, V6N 4C4, Fax: (604) 263-4212, e-mail jobs@musqueam.bc.ca

Information: http://fnis.arts.ubc.ca/2016/06/03/jobb-opportunity-musqueam-historical-timeline-project-assistant

2017 Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund Call for Letters of Intent for Large TLEF Grants. Due: July 15, 2016

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The application process for TLEF grants is divided into Large and Small project pools.  Large TLEF Grants are those over $5,000, and capped at $250,000 over the life of the project, and this funding can be active for up to three years. For multi-year projects, 2nd- and/or 3rd-year funding is contingent upon satisfactory progress in meeting project goals.  Multiyear proposals must contain a sustainment plan for project activities, with details on how the project will be sustained beyond the TLEF funding window, and an indication of the source of future sustainment funding. With both Large and Small TLEF proposals, the principal applicant’s department head must indicate his or her support before the proposal can be submitted to the TLEF.

Applications for Large TLEF Projects go through a two-stage approval process, starting with a Letter Of Intent, and then, for those applicants who are invited to move forward, a full proposal and budget due by October 14, 2016.

Apply online at: http://apply.tlef.ubc.ca (Sample proposal forms and information available at http://tlef.ubc.ca)

Deadline for Large TLEF Project LOIs:  3:00 pm on July 15, 2016.  Late submissions will not be accepted.

*Please note: If you currently hold a Large TLEF Project grant and plan on seeking 2nd- or 3rd-year funding, you do not need to submit a new LOI; rather, you will need to submit an updated proposal, budget, and Interim Report on your project through the online application system by the October 14th 2016 deadline.

 

Proposal Development Support drop-in sessions will be available through The Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT), Faculty Support Units, UBC Studios and the Library. Please ensure that you consult with central- and Faculty-based support units if you are intending to request their support in the development of your project.

June – August contact: tlef.info@ubc.ca  to request consultation support.

September – November, CTLT will host weekly drop-in sessions (information available http://events.ctlt.ubc.ca

Questions: tlef.info@ubc.ca  or call 604-827-0729.

John W. Davies Memorial Award. Due: June 29, 2016

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John W. Davies Memorial Award

Two awards of $3,000 are offered by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, Arctic Section in memory of John W. Davies, a former Chairman of the Section. The competition is open to any full time graduate student whose research will assist in providing solutions to problems encountered in the Arctic or in cold ocean environments.

Deadline: 29 June 2016 11:00 PM PST
More info: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/john-w-davies-memorial-award