Day: December 13, 2016

Visiting Assistant Professor of Native American Indian Studies, Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA. Due: Jan 15, 2017

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Dickinson College invites applications for a two-year position as Visiting Assistant Professor in Native American Studies. The successful candidate should have Native American Studies as his or her major field of research; a Ph.D. is acceptable in a related field. In addition to teaching within his or her field of expertise at all levels of the curriculum, the candidate will teach within a related home department. We welcome interdisciplinary, empirical, and humanistic approaches and the position carries a teaching load of five courses per academic year.
 
Applicants should enjoy discussion-oriented teaching and demonstrate an ability to create an inclusive learning community environment for an increasingly diverse student body. Applicants should also have a strong commitment to teaching in a liberal arts setting.
 
Interested candidates should apply for this position electronically at http://jobs.dickinson.edu/
 
Please submit a cover letter, curriculum vita, statement of teaching philosophy, description of research, and relevant student evaluations. Please also arrange for three letters of recommendation to be submitted via the electronic submission system. The due date for completed applications is January 15, 2017.
 
Dickinson is located in Carlisle, PA, twenty minutes west of Harrisburg and a two-hour drive from Baltimore, Washington DC, and Philadelphia. A top-tier liberal arts college, Dickinson prides itself on a faculty who combine excellent teaching and research.
 
The College is committed to building a representative and diverse faculty, administrative staff, and student body. We encourage applications from all qualified persons.
 
Please direct any questions involving the position to Professor Jerry Philogene (philogej@dickinson.edu).
 
 

Funding – Creating Humanities Communities Grant, National Endowment for the Humanities. Due: Feb 15, 2017

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Please see the grant announcement below.  NEH is looking to fund projects and programs in key “incentive areas” which include Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.  These projects can and should be collaborations between an institution, such as a university or university program, and a community entity, like a tribal community or tribal program.  The grants are smaller in nature due to their matching requirement, but matching funds can be raised over the course of three years.  NEH staff is available for consultation throughout the application process.  Please consider applying and pass along to others in these states for their consideration.  Application Deadline is February 15, 2017. 

 

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced Creating Humanities Communities, a new grant that supports grassroots humanities programs by encouraging partnerships and collaborations between multiple institutions or organizations in a town, county, region, or area. NEH hopes that the relationships built and strengthened through Creating Humanities Communities will lead to increases and improvements in humanities infrastructure for years to come, even beyond the initial activities funded by these grants.

 

CFP – Rising Up: Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies Graduate Student Conference, University of Manitoba. Due: Feb 3, 2017

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Rising Up: A Graduate Students Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies is an international gathering held annually. Rising Up attracts scholars in all forms of Indigenous research with approximately 60 representatives from around the world to showcase their work.
The University of Manitoba Native Studies Graduate Students Association (NSGSA) is hosting the second annual two-day conference for all graduate students to lead the discussion across all disciplines and allow graduates to present their knowledge and research.
This year the Conference will take place between March 17th and 18th in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Rising Up 2017 will focus on Indigenous Knowledge and Indigenous Research.
Submission of abstracts
The deadline for abstract submissions is currently February 3rd, 2017 and can be sent online via risingup@umanitoba.ca. Abstracts will be accepted online, reviewed and notification provided on a rolling basis. Abstracts should be 150- 200 words and include First name, last name, University program or department and personal email address.
NSGSA invites its network to share the call for abstracts and the information about the Conference to all of those interested in contributing to this year event.
What: Conference: Rising Up: A Graduate Student Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies.
When: March 17-18, 2017
Where: University of Manitoba, Fort Garry Campus
This is a free event, open to all.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.
Top of Form
Pishshapmishko (Take Care)
Laura Forsythe, B.A., B Ed.
Masters Candidate
Native Studies Graduate Students Association 

University of Manitoba 

Graduate Programs: CTLT, Teaching Assistants Institute

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The TA Institute is open to any graduate student who is interested in teaching or TAing. The Institute includes sessions on teaching and learning theory, scholarship, classroom strategies, campus climate, and lesson design.

 

Design Thinking in Teaching

January 10, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

How do you design a successful lesson? This workshop will discuss common challenges in lesson planning and develop a toolkit of best practices and strategies. More info

 

Grad Student Mental Health

January 10, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Do you ever feel overwhelmed as a TA and feel like students can see right through you? In this workshop, we will address raising self-awareness on “impostor syndrome” and identify strategies for self-care and navigating teaching and life as a grad student. More info

 

Developing a SoTL Project

January 10, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This workshop will help you design a research project to evaluate the quality of teaching and learning in your course. Learn the fundamentals of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and create a blueprint for your very first SoTL project. More info

 

Metacognition, Lifelong Learning, and Disciplinary Practice

January 11, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

How can you help students become lifelong learners? This session will examine the idea of metacognition as a distinct and valuable practice in teaching and learning. More info

 

Transliteracies

January 11, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This workshop explores how TAs can develop safer, more trans-inclusive pedagogical practices in their various role(s) in the classroom and on campus. More info

 

Giving Guest Lectures and Presentations

January 11, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Learn more about guest lectures and presentations, and design a toolkit to prepare for successful lectures or presentations. More info

 

Experiential Learning: Concept and its Application in Lesson Planning

January 12, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Explore the experiential learning cycle, its value in teaching contexts, and ways to integrate the model into your lesson planning and teaching. More info

 

Incorporating Results from SoTL

January 12, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This professional development workshop is open to grad students interested in learning more about Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. More info

 

Unsettling Group Guidelines

January 12, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Classroom guidelines are often used by educators with the intent to establish a “safe” learning environment. But others have argued that classroom guidelines sometimes fail to recognize and respond to issues of power and social position. More info

 

Thank You!

 

Elissa Morris
Events Assistant | Centre for Teaching Learning and Technology
The University of British Columbia | Vancouver
214-1961 East Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1 Canada
Phone 604 827 4871| elissa.morris@ubc.ca

http://www.ctlt.ubc.ca | @UBC_CTLT

 

 

CFP – Indigenous Expressions of Culture in Storytelling, Drama, Theatre and Performance – Traditional and Contemporary Canadian and Polish Upper Silesian Perspectives. Due: Dec 31, 2016

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A Conference Organized by the University of Silesia,  Poland  and the University of the Fraser Valley, Canada

April 26-28, 2017, University of Silesia, Sosnowiec campus

Second Call for Proposals

Indigenous Expressions of Culture in Storytelling, Drama, Theatre and Performance –Traditional and Contemporary Canadian and  Polish Upper Silesian Perspectives.

Confirmed Speaker: Tomson Highway (Cree)

“Storytelling is at the  core of decolonizing,  because it is a process of remembering, visioning and creating a just reality […] [it] becomes a lens through which we can envision our way out of cognitive imperialism” (Simpson 89)

The first of the intended series of conferences dedicated to the exploration of the complexity of Indigenous cultures of North America and minor cultures of Eastern/Central Europe – is a joint project of the Department of English and Indigenous Affairs Office, University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), Canada,  and the  Canadian Studies Centre, Department of American and Canadian Studies, Theatrum Research Group and the Centre for the Study of Minor Cultures at the University of Silesia (US),  Poland. As Canadian and Polish scholars and educators working in the fields of  Indigenous, minor, and transcultural literary and cultural studies, we propose that the first conference will explore the traditional and contemporary expressions of culture in Indigenous America,  specifically Canada, and in the Eastern/Central European territory of Upper Silesia, specifically Poland, with a primary focus on the  acts of resistance, survival and celebration of culture as enacted in storytelling, drama, theatre and performance (DTP). Performance is interpreted broadly including traditional and contemporary music and dance as well as festival events understood as modes of cultural storytelling. We envision the event as a meeting of Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars representing a variety of disciplines  and Indigenous Canadian and Upper Silesian storytellers, writers,  artists, performers,  educators and community members.

Our aim is to explore the richness of Indigenous expressions of culture in storytelling and DPT in Canada and Upper Silesia. We believe that the transcultural dialogue between scholars, artists and educators of marginalized cultures will be an enriching learning experience for all,  but especially for Upper Silesians, colonized by diverse powers throughout history, whose most recent struggle for recognition,  including the processes of cultural and linguistic revitalization, can benefit from such transcultural encounters.

The exploration of Canadian scholarship on Indigenous literatures and cultures, and especially the work of Indigenous playwrights, artists, performers, scholars/critics and educators is of great interest to the critics of minor/ Indigenous literatures and cultures in Europe. We believe that in spite of many differences between Indigenous cultures of America and minor cultures of Eastern/Central Europe, critical insights and analytical tools offered by Indigenous research methodologies, epistemologies and pedagogical theories  can provide instructive,  alternative ways of approaching the under-studied and under-theorized works of European minor/Indigenous writers, performers and artists. A panel discussion by specialists in this area will explore diverse perspectives on these complex issues.

Prospective participants are invited to submit proposals for traditional and non-traditional presentations that broadly address the theme of the conference. Submissions from graduate and postgraduate students at any stage of their research are welcome. The following list of topics should be regarded as neither exhaustive nor prescriptive:

  • Re-reading and re-writing of history in DTP
  • Poetics, aesthetics and politics of identity construction in DTP
  • Storytelling, drama, theatre and performance as tools of decolonization and pedagogy
  • Storytelling as a repository and archive of Indigenous knowledge
  • Interrogating the concept of indigeneity: theorizing indigenous and minor cultures perspectives
  • Indigeneity of Upper Silesia
  • Transindigeneity and a dialogue of cultures
  • Indigenous ontology, epistemology, axiology, and methodology and their translation into storytelling and DTP
  • Use of oral traditions, stories,  culture and history to promote activism
  • Inventing home through stories and performance: a decolonizing approach to DTP
  • Performing history and re-visioning of community memories DTP
  • The role of the storytelling and DTP in the cultural revival of Canadian Indigenous cultures
  • The role of the storytelling and DTP in the cultural revival of Upper Silesian culture and language
  • (De)Construction of cultural identity in storytelling and DTP
  • Traditional knowledge and values in storytelling and DTP
  • Indigenous/ local knowledge and traditional and contemporary expressions of culture
  • Performance of identity and  language recovery and revitalization
  • Language recovery and revitalization and identity construction
  • Methodological practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC) as a possible model for the Upper Silesian expressions of culture
  • Diversity of the traditional Indigenous forms of cultural expression in the contemporary Canadian Indigenous and Upper Silesian DTP
  • Theories of affect and the enactment of Indigenous cultures in storytelling and DTP
  • Traditional knowledge versus folklore and its performance
  • Folklore and theatre
  • The role of folklore in preserving Indigenous and minor cultures
  • The condition of ritual in theatre – Canadian Indigenous and Slavic perspectives
  • Contemporary storytelling methods in DTP
  • The poetics of place and aesthetic values
  • Poetic auto-creation and mythologizing of Indigenous cultures and landscapes
  • Indigenous values and cosmologies and their translation into DTP
  • Heritage tourism and storytelling
  • Cultural festivals and their role in preserving and inventing cultures

With a comparative project in mind, we are initiating new avenues of research related to the marginalized local/ indigenous/minor cultures of Eastern/Central Europe studied in the context of Indigenous cultures of North America. We hope this pioneering venture in will lead to a greater understanding of the Indigenous and minor cultures functioning within major dominant national narratives of Canada and Poland.

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE:

University of Silesia:                                         University of the Fraser Valley                                      

Eugenia Sojka

Aneta Głowacka                                            Michelle LaFlamme

Sabina Sweta Sen                                             Shirley Swelchalot Shxwha:yathel Hardman

Rafał Madeja

 

Deadline for abstracts:  December 31st 2016 ;

Notification of acceptance:  January 6th 2017

 

Please send proposals to: indigenoustheatre2017poland@gmail.com

 

Proposal submission address: 

(i) Individual proposals should be 250-300 words.

(ii) For panels, in English, or Polish, please send the title of the panel and a 250-word presentation explaining the overall focus together with a 250-300 word abstract for each participant.

(iii) Please attach a short bio to your conference paper proposal.

All files should be clearly marked with the applicants’ name. Please make sure the files are in the PDF format.

 

Registration fee: covering welcome reception, all conference materials, coffee breaks, and conference banquet.

  • $ 250 US – full time faculty
  • $125 US – students and part-time faculty

Publication: selected papers based on the conference presentations will be published in a refereed  monograph.

The conference website will be opened shortly.

 

 

 

 

Museum of Anthropology: December 2016

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Coming Soon: Gallery of Northwest Coast Masterworks
In case you missed our big news last month, MOA will soon be home to a significant collection of historical and contemporary Indigenous artworks and a new Gallery of Northwest Coast Masterworks. The anonymous donation of more than 200 pieces of Indigenous art, worth an estimated $7 million, is believed to be the largest collection of Northwest Coast First Nations art to return to B.C. in recent decades.

Work on the new gallery has already begun, and it is scheduled to open in June. We’re incredibly excited by this development, and we invite you to learn more about it on our website. You can see a few of the donated objects above, or take a moment to view our Masterworks photo gallery on Flickr. 

Make Your Own Ceramic Art with MOA’s Artist in Residence
Javier Ramirez, a highly acclaimed ceramic artist from Mexico, is in residence at MOA until December 15. Drop by and visit him as he creates a Tree of Life sculpture for our collection. Or better yet, you can join Javier this Saturday for a rare chance to sculpt your own ceramic creations and have them fired in a dugout, wood-burning kiln on MOA’s grounds. Learn more and get tickets.
Unique Gifts Galore at our Winter Art Market
If you’re searching for thoughtful gifts for friends and family, you’ll find plenty of ideas at our annual Winter Art Market. Our wonderful staff at the MOA Shop have gathered up their favourite seasonal items and stocked up on your favourite gifts, such as this stunning shirt by Nuxalk artist Danika Naccarella, the winner of our t-shirt contest this year. The Winter Art Market runs at the MOA Shop until December 24. 
Holiday Hours
Gather your family up and bring them to MOA this holiday season for a tour, or simply take in one of our temporary exhibitions. We’re open our regular hours, with a few exceptions:
  • December 24: 10 am – 2:30 pm
  • December 25: Closed
  • December 31: 10 am – 2:30 pm
Calendar of Events

 

CFP – Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism; 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium Currents of Resistance, Due: Jan 13, 2017

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CALL FOR PAPERS Due: January 13, 2017

6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium

Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism

April 13-14, 2017 UC Davis

 

We are pleased to announce the 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium, to be held on the UC Davis campus on April 13-14, 2017. We welcome proposals from current graduate students and tribal college students from across the globe whose research critically addresses the issues, concerns, and lives of indigenous peoples worldwide.

 

This year’s theme, “Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism” draws inspiration and guidance from the affirmation “Mni Wiconi” or “Water is Life,” a call heard and repeated across the globe in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux actively resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline. This and previous struggles continue to connect indigenous activists and allies around the causes of Native sovereignty, environmental protection, land reclamation, and justice for indigenous peoples who have been brutalized and criminalized for fighting for the right to exist. Like rivers meeting the sea, Native and non-Native currents of resistance, activism and justice are coming together, uniting our voices as we find each other. It is in this spirit of unity that we extend our call for papers across and beyond Turtle Island. Some of the questions we hope to explore during this year’s symposium include:

 

● What are decolonial and indigenized correctives for current globalized neoliberalism?

● How can we indigenize the voices of resistance and justice against the calls of moderation and modernization?

● How do indigenous peoples work together to create sacred spaces for intellectual metamorphosis?

● How do indigenous communities and allies come together to mobilize indigenous knowledge for change?

These and many other questions call upon the wisdom and efforts of our diverse communities and relatives.

 

Graduate students from all disciplines from universities worldwide are encouraged to participate in this international dialogue. Presentations should be 12-15 minutes in length.

Possible areas of interest may include (but are not limited to):

 

Arts/Artists/Creative Expressions

Performance/Theater

Activist/ Social Movements

Indigenous Methodologies/Interpretations

Colonization/Internal Colonization/Decolonization

Queer Theory

Survivance

Women/Gender/Sexuality

Community Development/Empowerment

Racial/physical/economic/political borders

Native American Studies Pedagogy

Culture/Language Preservations

Critical Theory/Philosophy/Worldviews

Animal Studies

Tourism and Native Communities

Representations in popular culture

Histories

Social media/technologies

Immigration

Literatures

Sovereignties/Autonomies

Structural Inequalities

 

Diverse presentation formats are encouraged:

● Paper or oral presentations

● Workshops

● Roundtables or panels

● Showcasing creative work

To submit your abstract, please click here.

Assistant Professor (tenure-track) of Social Justice and Carcerality, University of Colorado Boulder

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Assistant Professor of Social Justice and Carcerality
Area of Specialization:  tenure-track assistant professor position in Social justice and carcerality studies (an interdisciplinary field that examines confinement in settings such as prisons, reservations, and plantations; the social and cultural conditions leading to criminalization and imprisonment; and bodily coercion in border policing and human trafficking)
We are particularly interested in applications from scholars focusing on borderlands and Latinx or Chican@ populations, however, the area of specialization for this position is open.
Preferred Research Areas:  Race, gender, and prisons, border policing, and human trafficking, with a focus on Latinx  and comparative ethnic studies.
Tenure-track assistant professor position in social justice and carcerality studies (an interdisciplinary field that examines confinement in settings such as prisons, reservations, and plantations; the social and cultural conditions leading to criminalization and imprisonment; and bodily coercion in border policing and human trafficking) to begin in Fall 2017.
We are particularly interested in applications from scholars focusing on borderlands and Latinx or Chican@ populations, however, the area of specialization for this position is open.
In line with building our newly established Ph.D. program in Comparative Ethnic Studies, we welcome comparative, interdisciplinary, and intersectional approaches and innovative theoretical perspectives.
For job posting, and additional application information, please go to https://cu.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?job=06679&lang=en

 

Lecturer (non-tenure), Environmental Studies, University of Redlands, California

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ANNOUNCEMENT OF FACULTY POSITION OPENING UNIVERSITY OF REDLANDS

Lecturer Environmental Studies September 23, 2016 Open until filled

The University of Redlands (www.redlands.edu) Department of Environmental Studies invites applications for a non-tenure-track Lecturer position in Environmental Studies.

We seek applicants broadly trained in environmental studies with experience in the teaching and praxis of some combination of environmental impact assessment, GIS applications in environmental management, environmental land-use planning, and other applications of environmental analysis and management. Applicants should demonstrate an ability to (1) enrich interdisciplinary offerings on campus through courses; and (2) thrive in an undergraduate program within a small private liberal arts university, where excellence in teaching and advising is highly valued. The successful applicant will have the ability to teach some combination of courses such as introduction to environmental studies, global environmental change, environmental impact assessment, project-oriented classes using GIS, and land- use planning.

The department will value applicants who have experience working with students from diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Applicants are asked to identify their strengths and experiences in assisting diverse student populations to accomplish curricular goals. The successful applicant will be expected to support the College of Arts and Science’s new general education curriculum.

The University of Redlands is a private, comprehensive liberal arts institution located 60 miles east of Los Angeles in a town of 70,000. The campus is surrounded by orange groves and sits at the base of the San Bernardino Mountains, one hour from the coast, and 40 miles west of Palm Springs.

Desired/Preferred Qualifications: A Masters degree in a relevant environmental field is required, though a Ph.D. is preferred. Desirable qualifications for this position include: a broad base of knowledge in environmental studies with specialization in writing and conducting environmental impact assessment, and GIS. Teaching load is 8 courses per year. There is the possibility of student advising reducing the teaching load, and one of those courses may be a travel course or field-intensive course during our month-long May term.

To Apply: Applicants should send a letter addressing their teaching interests, current CV, at least three letters of reference, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and a sample of professional writing to Apply@redlands.edu. Limit attachments to 11 MB or less.

In compliance with the American with Disabilities Act, if selected for the interview process and accommodations are needed, please call (909) 748-8040.

SUBMISSION OF A CURRICULUM VITAE OR APPLICATION INDICATES AGREEMENT THAT THE UNIVERSITY MAY VERIFY ANY AND ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED THEREIN

MEMBERS OF UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Department Chair, Arizona State University, American Indian Studies Program

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Department Chair (JOB #11784)
Arizona State University
American Indian Studies Program
 
The American Indian Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe Campus, invites applications for Director, with a concurrent appointment as tenured Professor. The anticipated start date is July 1, 2017.
 
The American Indian Studies Program (AIS) is a leading undergraduate and graduate degree program among Southwestern research universities.  AIS offers B.S. and M.S. degrees, an undergraduate minor, and houses the Wicazo Sa Review:  A Journal of Native American Studies. AIS scholarship and teaching focus on tribal sovereignty, cultural integrity, and identity of the American Indian nations and peoples. AIS faculty are embedded in Indigenous communities, work cooperatively with other departments and programs across the campus, engage in a national and international network of professional associations and consultancies, and are dedicated to providing access, retaining, and graduating American Indian students and students of all backgrounds in a climate that is welcoming and respectful of their languages and cultures. Located on the Tempe Campus, ASU’s American Indian Studies is centered among twenty-one Arizona Indian nations, within a large urban Native population, and a growing university enrollment of more than 1,200 American Indian students from Arizona and elsewhere, making it a dynamic location to examine and address Indigenous issues. 
 
The successful candidate will be committed to creating a learning environment conducive to critical and creative thought by and across ASU’s diverse student, faculty, and community populations, and will work to advance an ambitious vision to:
  • Be among the Top 5 American Indian Studies programs in the world
  • Provide models and research to demonstrate the value and relevance of American Indian Studies scholarship in support of American Indian nations, organizations, leadership, and community
  • Develop the growth of the graduate program
 
Reporting to the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences through the Dean of Social Sciences, the Director will provide administrative leadership and academic vision, and will engage the faculty in shaping a productive, collegial environment that advances unit goals and objectives. The Director will also provide strong leadership in fiscal planning and administration, donor development and relations, the promotion of scholarship and external funding, development and implementation of strategic diversity initiatives related to faculty, staff and students, and in the exploration and development of opportunities for collaboration within and beyond the university.
 
Minimum Qualifications
·         Terminal degree in American Indian Studies or related field
·         A scholarly record commensurate with the rank of tenured Professor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (advanced Associate Professors may be considered for expedited promotion to full in advance of start date)
·         Demonstrated success in an administrative/leadership capacity
 
Desired Qualifications
·         Demonstrated work experience with interdisciplinary fields, tribal communities, community-based research, alumni and donor relations
·         A record of externally-funded research
·         Research focus in law, policy, decolonizing methodologies, governance, arts, economic development, traditional knowledge systems, cultural and intellectual property rights, or sustainability 
·         Demonstrated success meeting the needs of diverse student populations and/or reaching out to diverse communities
 
To apply, please submit to Alicia.Richardson@asu.edu as a single PDF document: a letter of interest which outlines qualifications, a curriculum vitae, and contact information including email for three references. References may be contacted at a later stage of the search and only with the candidate’s approval. Initial deadline for receipt of complete applications is November 18, 2016; if not filled, complete applications will be reviewed each week thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.
 
Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. https://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html and https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/