CFP – Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism; 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium Currents of Resistance, Due: Jan 13, 2017

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CALL FOR PAPERS Due: January 13, 2017

6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium

Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism

April 13-14, 2017 UC Davis

 

We are pleased to announce the 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium, to be held on the UC Davis campus on April 13-14, 2017. We welcome proposals from current graduate students and tribal college students from across the globe whose research critically addresses the issues, concerns, and lives of indigenous peoples worldwide.

 

This year’s theme, “Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism” draws inspiration and guidance from the affirmation “Mni Wiconi” or “Water is Life,” a call heard and repeated across the globe in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux actively resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline. This and previous struggles continue to connect indigenous activists and allies around the causes of Native sovereignty, environmental protection, land reclamation, and justice for indigenous peoples who have been brutalized and criminalized for fighting for the right to exist. Like rivers meeting the sea, Native and non-Native currents of resistance, activism and justice are coming together, uniting our voices as we find each other. It is in this spirit of unity that we extend our call for papers across and beyond Turtle Island. Some of the questions we hope to explore during this year’s symposium include:

 

● What are decolonial and indigenized correctives for current globalized neoliberalism?

● How can we indigenize the voices of resistance and justice against the calls of moderation and modernization?

● How do indigenous peoples work together to create sacred spaces for intellectual metamorphosis?

● How do indigenous communities and allies come together to mobilize indigenous knowledge for change?

These and many other questions call upon the wisdom and efforts of our diverse communities and relatives.

 

Graduate students from all disciplines from universities worldwide are encouraged to participate in this international dialogue. Presentations should be 12-15 minutes in length.

Possible areas of interest may include (but are not limited to):

 

Arts/Artists/Creative Expressions

Performance/Theater

Activist/ Social Movements

Indigenous Methodologies/Interpretations

Colonization/Internal Colonization/Decolonization

Queer Theory

Survivance

Women/Gender/Sexuality

Community Development/Empowerment

Racial/physical/economic/political borders

Native American Studies Pedagogy

Culture/Language Preservations

Critical Theory/Philosophy/Worldviews

Animal Studies

Tourism and Native Communities

Representations in popular culture

Histories

Social media/technologies

Immigration

Literatures

Sovereignties/Autonomies

Structural Inequalities

 

Diverse presentation formats are encouraged:

● Paper or oral presentations

● Workshops

● Roundtables or panels

● Showcasing creative work

To submit your abstract, please click here.

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