Month: January 2017

Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film

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Ten inspiring animated shorts from 2016

December 29, 2016

With films like Pocahontas, Apocalypto, Peter Pan and The Green Inferno, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has a deplorable track record when it comes to its portrayal of Indigenous Peoples. Perhaps it’s to be expected given that films tend to be produced through a Eurocentric lens. Even when production companies try to get it right, they still somehow manage to fail–such as the case with Disney’s Moana.

It makes us all the more grateful that Hollywood has lost its monopoly on film. New Independent film makers are constantly emerging to give us something genuine, heartfelt and inspired to watch with family and friends.

This year was particularly exciting for indigenous film. Among the hundreds–if not, thousands–of feature films, documentaries and television shows that indigenous filmmakers made in 2016, indigenous nations started releasing their own independently-produced films to tell their own stories in their own words and languages.

We also saw a sturdy wave of truly inspiring animated shorts that celebrate indigenous culture, breathing new life into the incredibly rich and equally important tradition of storytelling.

We loved these animated shorts so much we just had to share them with you. Read more…

 

Source: Schertow, John Ahni. January 18, 2017. Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film. Retrieved from:  https://intercontinentalcry.org/celebrating-indigenous-culture-animated-film/

BC Aboriginal Student Awards and BC Aboriginal Teacher Education Awards. Due: Mar 31, 2017

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The 2017 BC Aboriginal Student Awards and BC Aboriginal Teacher Education Awards are now available through the Irving K. Barber BC Scholarship Society. Instructions on how to apply, links to application forms, and full eligibility criteria are found on the Society’s NEW website at http://www.ikbbc.ca

The application deadline is Friday, March 31, 2017.

Job – Program Coordinator, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care, P/T Position. Due: Feb 13, 2017 –

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Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care

Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care
Part-Time Contract Position

Are you passionate about protecting B.C.’s ocean and wilderness and keeping B.C.’s public land and water wild forever? Are you excited by the opportunities and challenges that come with working in a complicated social and political landscape with a myriad of views on the best solutions?

CPAWS-BC is seeking a dynamic Program Coordinator to lead the creation of a new a CPAWS-BC program, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care. Based at the CPAWS-BC office in Vancouver, the Program Coordinator will be responsible for coordinating and executing all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth In Care Program. The Program Coordinator ensures the smooth delivery of the program objectives and positive participant experience while maintaining partner relationships and administrating the day to day project tasks. The Program Coordinator will work closely with the Executive Director and Community Engagement Coordinator.
The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, BC Chapter (CPAWS-BC) is one of Canada’s oldest non-profit conservation groups. We protect wilderness in every corner of BC and deep into the ocean. We have been protecting BC’s nature since 1978 and are dedicated to keeping BC’s public land and water wild forever. We need help protecting wilderness in every corner of B.C. and deep into the ocean. Is that you?
CPAWS-BC’s hiring practices give priority to Aboriginal people and people who face barriers to employment. We encourage applications from former youth in the foster care system and Indigenous people living in BC.
Key Responsibilities:

Community Engagement

  • Build, manage and maintain relationships with program partners to further program objectives;
  • Coordinate all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program, including assisting youth participants with problem solving and planning, as well as evaluating and reporting on the program;
  • Recruit youth in or who have transitioned out of the foster care system to join the Youth Advisory Committee;
  • Coordinate and complete administrative tasks relating to program activities;
  • Facilitate Youth Advisory Committee meetings, workshops, and presentations in both indoor and outdoor settings;
  • Lead outdoor activities (e.g. hiking, snowshoeing, canoeing, etc.)
  • Create and implement the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program using feedback from the Youth Advisory Committee and social service organization;
  • Track expenditures and manage program budget; and
  • Serve as an ambassador for the organization, leaving all with a positive perception if the organization and its staff.

Monitoring and Evaluation

  • Ensure the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program has a clear strategy, deliverables, and assessment tools (to measure success); and
  • Regularly report back on program using reliable metrics and evaluation tools.

Core Requirements/ Competencies:

  • Problem solver and solutions based thinker, who is able to demonstrate a passion for community engagement
  • Must have a strong understanding of privilege and oppression and how it impacts community engagement/community work in the context of youth in the foster care system
  • Experience in planning and program management, including goal setting, determining strategies to move a program forward, create and implement action plans, manage budgets, and monitor and evaluate programs in order to report on deliverables
  • Flexibility/ adaptability. Tolerant of a constantly changing work environment and adjust quickly to changing priorities and conditions
  • Experience facilitating workshops for youth and adults
  • Experience leading outdoor activities
  • Community organizing

 

Qualifications:

  • 2 years experience working with vulnerable populations or at-risk-youth in an outdoor setting
  • Experience in the fields of environmental stewardship, environmental education, and curriculum development is considered an asset
  • Experience with Microsoft Office suite
  • A valid class 5 (or higher) driver’s licence without restrictions
  • A clear criminal record with respect to working with youth and vulnerable populations (the actual criminal check will be done using our system after the interview – do not do in advance)
  • Ability to work in Canada, without restrictions

Additional Asset Criteria:

  • Lived experience with the Foster Care system
  • Additional fluency in languages other than English
  • Experience working in the NGO/ENGO sector
  • A passion for conservation work
  • An ability to work in a fast paced, high distraction environment
  • Being extremely well organized

Note: This position may include working with vulnerable people and therefore a successful Criminal Records Check will be required. CPAWS-BC will conduct the records check for the successful candidate. Please do not apply for a Criminal Records Check in advance of being offered the position as CPAWS-BC has a specific system that we are required to use.

Location and working environment: This is a six month part-time, 20 hours per week, contract position at CPAWS-BC’s downtown Vancouver office. Our work environment appeals to self-directed, flexible team players who have excellent interpersonal skills. Our office is close to multiple transit options and we have an open, hard-working, fun, and creative team environment.

Compensation: Compensation starts at $20 per hour and increases on a scale commensurate with the experience of the successful candidate.

Preferred start date: Late February or Early March, 2017

 

Application Process

Applications: Please send a cover letter and resume with the subject line: “Program Coordinator Position” to the attention of the CPAWS-BC Hiring Committee at hiring@cpawsbc.org. No phone calls or inquiries please.

Please ensure that your cover letter indicates how you meet the CPAWS-BC’s Core Requirements and Qualifications, as well as how your past experience will make you successful with this position’s Key Responsibilities.

Deadline: 13 February 2017, at 11:59pm

Please note that we will not be able to respond to applicants until after the deadline, with the exception of an auto-response that you will receive immediately to indicate that your application has been received.

For more information on CPAWS-BC visit our website at www.cpawsbc.org and sign-up on our mailing list, or connect with us on Twitter and Facebook: cpawsbc

Building Legal Colonialism: Liberal Enclosure and Indigenous Self-Determination. 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Jan 10, 2017

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Building Legal Colonialism:
Liberal Enclosure and
Indigenous Self-Determination

An Inaugural Lecture at the
Peter A. Allard School of Law

Professor Gordon Christie’s research focuses on questions of Aboriginal rights. He has published on many of the signal decisions in Canadian Aboriginal law, from Delgamuukw to Tsilhqot’in Nation, and his work explores a broad range of issues, including Aboriginal rights and title, Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and processes of consultation and accommodation. As an Indigenous scholar, Professor Christie has been an important voice as well in the development of thinking on Indigenous legal traditions. His most recent project involves an attempt to move beyond the dominant mode of critical analysis with respect to Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal rights, which relies on and champions particular, but often conflicting, normative theories of the law to analyse court decisions. His forthcoming book, Making Sense of Aboriginal Rights: An Exercise in Methodological Naturalism, explores the question of how the nature of the law might be theorized in a way that allows for a non-normative description and explanation of the dynamics of Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal questions, in terms of the actions of one meaning-generating community—the settler state and its legal institutions—with relation to numerous and varied Indigenous meaning-generating communities.

Professor Christie joined the Allard School of Law at UBC in 2004, serving as Academic Director of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program from 2005 to 2016. Prior to coming to Allard Law he held a faculty appointment at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University), where he was also Director of the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments. He obtained B.A. in Philosophy from Princeton University, followed by an LL.B. from the University of Victoria and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Barbara. At the Allard School of Law, he teaches in the areas of aboriginal law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as first-year Torts.

TUESDAY
JAN 10, 2017
5:30 – 6:30PM
Allard Hall,
Franklin Lew Forum
The Inaugural Lecture tradition at the Allard School of Law celebrates the promotion of faculty members to full Professor with a public lecture addressed to the broad themes of their scholarly work.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP
Peter A. Allard School of Law
The University of British Columbia
Allard Hall, 1822 East Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
T 604.822.6335
http://www.allard.ubc.ca

An Afternoon of Dance: Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum. Due: 12:30 – 2:30pm, Jan 9, 2017

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An Afternoon of Dance with

Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum

January 9th 2017

12:30 – 2:30pm

Sty-Wet-Tan Hall, UBC Longhouse, 1985 West Mall

Following the performances, open conversation with Dallas Arcand, Madelaine McCallum and Filmmaker, Darcy Muenchrath.
Everyone is welcome.Afternoon_of_Dance_poster.jpg

CFP – Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories – Indigenous Literary Studies Association Conference. Due: Jan 31, 2017

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Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories: ILSA’s Annual Conference

this year held at the Stó:lō Nation Teaching Longhouse 7201 Vedder Road, Chilliwack on the Unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to join us in generating new conversations about protocols, pedagogies, land, and stories from a wide variety of perspectives, including tribally-centred, inter-tribal, pan-national, urban/suburban, and trans-Indigenous, at ILSA’s third annual gathering, this time taking place on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples in the Stó:lō Teaching Longhouse in Chilliwack, B.C. In a 2007 essay Stó:lō historian Dr. Albert Sonny Naxaxalhts’i McHalsie shares a Halq’emélem statement that is often interpreted as an assertion of Aboriginal rights and title: “S’ólh Téméxw te ikw’elo. Xolhmet te mekw’stam it kwelat,” which can be translated as “This is our Land. We have to take care of everything that belongs to us” (85). As McHalsie reflects on the boundaries of his territory, he follows the protocols of his community, consulting his elders to uncover teachings embedded in the Halq’emélem language and in Stó:lō stories. Through these protocols he replaces Western concepts of ownership with Stó:lō understandings of personal connection to place, sharing stories that explicate multiple ways of reading the land around him. McHalsie concludes that the statement is not merely an assertion of what belongs to Stó:lō but of belonging, insisting that as his people take care of their territory they necessarily have to take care of stories and understandings of the world embedded within wider kinship relations—between communities, nations, cultures, languages, as well as with the other-than-human.

Inspired by McHalsie’s words, Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories asks participants to consider ways in which our scholarship, activism, and creative work cares for stories and centres Indigenous perspectives. In what ways can this care and attention honour Indigenous protocols and shape our pedagogies? How might writers or artists who live distanced or alienated from home territories practice such ethics? How might we consider Indigenous cultural production in cyberspace as linked to land? What does it mean to read texts through treaty documents, the history of colonization, or stories that emerge from land-theft and dislocation? What new traditions are Indigenous people, especially those who live in the city, creating?

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association supports diverse modes of creating and disseminating knowledge. Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, with at least 15 minutes for questions and discussion. In keeping with our desire to enable dialogue and community- based learning, we welcome session proposals that utilize non-standard or alternative formats. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with the following topics:

• “Taking care of everything that belongs to us,” land claims and cultural repatriation
• Stó:lō narrative arts and Stó:lō literary history, present, and future
• Politics of belonging and kinship relations
• Land, ecological responsibility, and environmental ethics
• Land-based solidarities, urban Indigenous communities, and the literary arts
• Literary methods and Indigenous protocols
• The politics of protocols—gender and surveillance
• Two-Spirit and queer Indigenous critical ecologies
• Land, stories, and narrative arts as praxis
• Autonomy and alliance in unceded traditional territories
• Community-based participatory research, pedagogies, and literary studies
• Alliances among Indigenous and diasporic artists
• Mediations of orality and Indigenous material cultures
• Collaborative creation and multi-media
• Artistic expressions of sovereignty and self-determination
• Responsibility, community, and artistic expression
• Community-specific Indigenous knowledge and ethics in scholarship or art
• methodologies and practices in Indigenous literary studies to serve the needs of Indigenous communities

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) was founded in 2014 to promote the scholarship and teaching of Indigenous writing and storytelling in Canada. One way to make our study of Indigenous literatures relevant to the writers who produce the stories we read, teach and study is to meet every other year at national conferences as part of Congress, and meet alternating years in Indigenous communities. In 2015 we met at Six Nations of the Grand River, near Hamilton, Ontario, and in 2016 we met at Congress, hosted that year at the University of Calgary. From June 18-20, 2017 we will be meeting on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples, in Chilliwack, B.C., about a half hour drive from the Abbotsford airport and about a one and a half hour drive from downtown Vancouver. This time was chosen to coincide with the annual conference of NAISA, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association meeting, at UBC from June 22-24, 2017.

Proposals are due on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 and this year’s proposals can be submitted to ilsa@sfu.ca. If you do not receive an acknowledgment of your proposal within 7 days, please contact the ILSA council members directly, especially in-coming ILSA President Deanna Reder or ILSA Secretary Sophie McCall. We remind you that prospective participants must be members in order to present at ILSA 2017 in Chilliwack.

Membership Rates are $40 (faculty) or $20 (students, community members, or underwaged) for one year. Please visit our website at
ILSA 2017 Call for Papers
http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org/membership-1/ to complete your membership.

Thank you for your continued support. Please note that for the 2016-2017 year, we will be using this email, ilsa@sfu.ca; we encourage our members to contact the ILSA Council directly should you have any concerns or ideas you wish to share.

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association Council 2016-2017
Deanna Reder, President (dhr@sfu.ca)
Jesse Archibald-Barber, President Elect (jbarber@firstnationsuniversity.ca)
Sophie McCall, Secretary (smccall@sfu.ca)
June Scudeler, Treasurer (june.scudeler@gmail.com)
Sarah Henzi, Early Career Member (sarahhenzi@gmail.com)
Angela Semple, Graduate Member (angelasemple@trentu.ca)
Sam McKegney, Past President (sam.mckegney@queensu.ca) http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org
Email: ilsa@sfu.ca

Morning Coffee and chat with Dr. Dustin Louie – Jan 11, 2017, 10:30-11:30 am

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You are invited to a SAGE morning coffee and chat with Indigenous scholar Dustin Louie, from the University of Calgary Faculty of Education.
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
10:30 to 11:30 am
Boardroom, First Nations Longhouse

 

It is a great chance to meet and chat about his work and maybe ask some questions about new scholar roles and responsibilities.

 

Following the coffee and chat, Dustin will be giving a talk at the Social Justice Institute in the Jack Bell Building on Indigenous girls and their over representation in sexual exploitation and sex trade. Please see attached poster.

2017-Jan11-DustinLouie.jpg

Aboriginal Scholarship Workshop, Social Lounge at UBC Longhouse. 12-1 pm, Jan 26, 2017

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Indigenous Student Scholarship Workshop

When: Thursday, January 26th, 2017 | 12 noon – 1pm
Where: Social Lounge at the Longhouse, 1985 West Mall, UBC Vancouver

Curious about what kinds of upcoming scholarship awards you could apply to?
Do you need help with filling out an application form for scholarships?
Academic Advisors and Enrolment Service Professionals (ESPs) will be reviewing several scholarships and are available to answer your questions. Drop by at noon, a free pizza lunch will be provided.

The workshop will review these awards*:

1. Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Health Awards
(http://health.aboriginal.ubc.ca/awards-and-scholarships/)

2. Indspire Scholarship
(https://indspire.ca/for-students/bursaries-scholarships/)

3. Irving K. Barber Scholarship
(http://www.ikbbc.ca/web/aboriginal/eligibility)

*Please note, these awards are open to all students (including those who are on Student Loans or are Band-Funded).

This workshop is open to both undergraduate and graduate Indigenous students at UBC Vancouver.

Please email arts.aboriginal@ubc.ca to RSVP (this helps us coordinate the pizza order). Student’s with classes that end at 12:30pm are still encouraged to attend the end portion of the workshop.

Add the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/485824031587874/

Funding – Youth or Mid-Career Artist Scholarships, YVR Art Foundation. Due: Jan 27, 2017

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The YVR Art Foundation – Call for Art Scholarship Applications
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The YVR ART FOUNDATION is pleased to announce a Call for Applications from BC and Yukon First Nations artists interested in applying for Youth or Mid-Career Artist Scholarships.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
2017 ART SCHOLARSHIPS

The YVR Art Foundation is now accepting applications for the
2017 Youth Scholarship and Mid-Career Artist Scholarship awards for
BC and Yukon First Nations artists.

Each award is valued at $5,000. Up to seven YVR Art Foundation Youth Scholarships and up to two Mid-Career Artist Scholarships will be awarded. Youth Scholarship recipients will be brought to Vancouver for an awards ceremony and their art work will be exhibited at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) for one year.

The deadline for applications is Friday, January 27, 2017.

Eligibility and criteria for the two scholarships include:

YVR Art Foundation Youth Scholarship
Eligible Applicants:
Are of BC or Yukon First Nations ancestry
Reside in BC or Yukon
Be between the ages of 16 and 26
Are emerging artists who create visual art that reflects BC or Yukon First Nations’ culture
Have the goal of becoming a professional artist
Are accepted to study with a mentor or at a formal institution of learning
Commit to attend the Scholarship Award ceremony in Vancouver on May 26, 2017 and the ceremony in recognition of the completed work, one year later, on May 25, 2018
YVR Art Foundation Mid-Career Scholarship
Eligible Applicants:
Are of BC or Yukon First Nations ancestry
Reside in BC or Yukon
Be age 27 or older
Create visual art that reflects BC or Yukon First Nations’ culture
Wish to further their art careers and/or extend their work into a new scale or medium
Have completed basic art training
Have achieved local and/or provincial recognition through public presentation of their artwork
Are accepted to study/work with an master artist; at a formal institution of learning; or on a special project that is of cultural significance to the artist’s community
Are able to submit a portfolio of artwork that demonstrates the artist’s commitment to their practice

For more information on the YVR Art Foundation and to apply for the scholarships go to the Foundation website: http://www.yvraf.com/programs.

Please forward this email to those who may be interested in applying for a scholarship. If you have any questions, please contact the YVR Art Foundation at cynthia@yvraf.com or ph. 604.276.6261.

Job – F/T Managing Director & P/T Special Events Coordinator with Kwi Awt Stelmexw. Due: Jan 11, 2017

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Hi all. I’m the founder and programming director for Kwi Awt Stelmexw — an arts & education organization based in Vancouver, BC. We’re a Coast Salish non-profit focused on advancing the cultural identity of the Squamish Peoples.

Kwi Awt Stelmexw is building a team of leaders who can make a difference in the Squamish Peoples’ lives — it’s a big job and we’re looking for super passionate, strategic, and dedicated people to make the dreams a reality.

The Squamish Peoples are rising. After decades of dispossession then neglect, the Squamish Peoples are charting their own path forward. Our fundraising campaigns, our language programs, our arts projects, and everything in between is for the betterment of the Squamish Peoples.

At Kwi Awt Stelmexw, you’ll work with a team of engaged, hard-working, and passionate colleagues showing the community and the world what is possible for advancing the cultural identity of the Squamish Peoples, in a flexible, collaborative, and dream-seeking environment. We are hiring for:
F/T Managing Director (6 month contract with potential to renew)
P/T Special Events Coordinator (6 month contract with potential to renew)
Learn more here: https://www.kwiawtstelmexw.com/about/hiring/
The Managing Director is really about finding an operations/manager person to work with me in building this emerging organization. There are very few Coast Salish-run and Coast Salish-focused non-profits in Vancouver and we’re looking to grow our team to support our work. If you could pass this along to help us spread the word, we’d be super grateful. Deadline to apply is Wednesday, January 11th, 2017 at 5pm.

Please feel free to message me if you or anyone you know is interested in learning more.

Thanks!
___________________

Khelsilem
Programming Director
Kwi Awt Stelmexw
PO Box 57145 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C., V5K 5G6
c: 604-809-6282 | m: 778-987-8809