Calls for Paper/Proposal

Call for Papers- Canadian Journal of Native Education 2018

Posted on

Canadian Journal of Native Education (second theme issue for 2018)
The Canadian Journal of Native Education (CJNE) will publish two theme volumes in 2018. Attached is a call for papers for the CJNE Volume 40, Number 2, “Awakening the Spirit: Indigenous Culture and Language Revitalization through Land, Water and Sky.” See attached call for papers. Deadline is January 5, 2018.
Advertisements

Save The Date: March 3, 2018, 16th Annual Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS)

Posted on Updated on

The 16th Annual Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS) will be hosted at UBC Vancouver in the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. The Call for Papers will be going out soon, with an anticipated submission deadline of January 15th, so save the date and start preparing your presentations!

If you are interested in helping to organize IGSS, please email SAGE at grad.sage@ubc.ca The first planning meeting will occur Thursday November 16th at the UBC longhouse (joining via Skype is also an option), and we are always grateful for help on the day of the event.

Call for Abstracts – Indigenous Health Conference: Walking Together

Posted on

Now Accepting Abstracts!
We are pleased to welcome your abstract submissions to the Indigenous Health Conference (IHC): Walking Together. The 2018 conference is designed to help healthcare providers understand how Indigenous ways of knowing with respect to health and well-being can be utilized in healthcare approaches for Indigenous peoples.
Selected abstracts from health care professionals, community partners and those involved in Indigenous Health will profile the work being done surrounding these and various topics through posters, oral presentations, and workshops.
Themes include:

 

  • Reconciliation
  • Youth Empowerment
  • Nutrition
  • Environmental health
  • Health care systems
  • Plus many more!

 

The call for abstracts closes Friday, January 12, 2018. Visit the abstracts page for more details https://www.cpd.utoronto.ca/indigenoushealth/abstractsubmission/ .
Start your submission today!

CFP – Special Issue, Critical Pedagogical Inquiry (CPI) ‘My spirit and heart soar’: Chief Dan George, due: May 31st, 2017

Posted on

Call for Submissions: Special Issue, Critical Pedagogical Inquiry (CPI)

‘My spirit and heart soar’: Chief Dan George
First Nations Contest the formal and lived curriculums.

The purpose of this special issue is to bring together a collection of articles, poems, photography, music and art that relate to conceptualizing, planning dreaming, hoping and taking positive actions for our 7 future generations. Proposals to contribute to the special issue are invited.

Understandably, all proposals and work submitted to the co-editors of the CPI, special issue are to be grounded in First Nations perspectives, world views, lived experiences and/or ways of knowing.

This special issue is inspired by the morning session of the Comparative and International Education Society of Canada (CIESC), Preconference on May 28, 2016, hosted at the University of Calgary. The morning session concentrated on First Nations issues and actions which contested colonial agendas in the formal and nonformal curricula.

Potential authors, poets and artists who are interested in contributing to this CPI special Issue, please, submit a proposal in either a single Word or PDF file to any of the CPI special issue, co-editors listed below, by May 31, 2017.

For further information, also, contact any of the co-editors.

Co-editors: Tiffany Prete. tbevans@ualberta.ca.
Loretta Loon. Loretta_Loon@edu.yorku.ca.
Celia Haig Brown. haigbro@yorku.ca.
Cecille DePass. depassc@ezpost.com.

Your proposal should include:

  • a title (up to 150 characters);
  • an abstract (100-150 words);
  • a description of the paper and/or visual images and/or music (400 words).

For more information, please see: CPI Call for Proposal summer2017

CFP – Indigenous Studies Area, Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Conference, due April 30th, 2017

Posted on

Abstracts may address any aspect of Aboriginal, First Nations, Maori, Sami, and other Indigenous popular cultures. In addition, the area highly encourages comparative papers between Indigenous and, say, Asian, Latin American, Pacific Islander, or African popular cultures. Topics might address, but are not in any way limited to the following:
o    Film and Animation
o    Television
o    New Media
o    Video Games, Blogging, YouTube
o    Fashion
o    Popular Literature
o    Radio shows
o    Theater, Festivals, Spectacles, and Ceremonies
o    Popular Music

Date: October 18-22nd, 2017

Location: Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch, MO

250 word abstracts may be submitted electronically before or by April 30, 2017 via the online submission system, http://submissions.mpcaaca.org.

For more information please see: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/169976/indigenous-studies-area-call-papers-midwest-popular-cultureaca

CFP – Oxford Education Research Symposium, Due: Feb 24, 2017

Posted on

The Oxford Education Research Symposium is a forum for presentation of papers and discourse by scholars who have a particular interest in the theory and practice of universal education. You are invited to present a paper on an aspect of education research, or you may wish to attend as an observer or panel member. If you wish to present a paper you will be requested to submit a brief abstract for review by the Programme Committee. Papers presented will be subsequently peer reviewed by external readers for possible inclusion in Symposium books or as sponsored journal articles.

 

Date: March 20 – 22, 2017

Location: Oxford University Club, Oxford, UK

 

Abstracts for the proposed papers are approved by the Programme Committee of the Symposium, and the list of suggested topics are available on the website.

Submission deadline: February 24, 2017

For more information, please visit: https://www.oxford-education-research-symposium.com

CFP – Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories – Indigenous Literary Studies Association Conference. Due: Jan 31, 2017

Posted on Updated on

Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories: ILSA’s Annual Conference

this year held at the Stó:lō Nation Teaching Longhouse 7201 Vedder Road, Chilliwack on the Unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to join us in generating new conversations about protocols, pedagogies, land, and stories from a wide variety of perspectives, including tribally-centred, inter-tribal, pan-national, urban/suburban, and trans-Indigenous, at ILSA’s third annual gathering, this time taking place on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples in the Stó:lō Teaching Longhouse in Chilliwack, B.C. In a 2007 essay Stó:lō historian Dr. Albert Sonny Naxaxalhts’i McHalsie shares a Halq’emélem statement that is often interpreted as an assertion of Aboriginal rights and title: “S’ólh Téméxw te ikw’elo. Xolhmet te mekw’stam it kwelat,” which can be translated as “This is our Land. We have to take care of everything that belongs to us” (85). As McHalsie reflects on the boundaries of his territory, he follows the protocols of his community, consulting his elders to uncover teachings embedded in the Halq’emélem language and in Stó:lō stories. Through these protocols he replaces Western concepts of ownership with Stó:lō understandings of personal connection to place, sharing stories that explicate multiple ways of reading the land around him. McHalsie concludes that the statement is not merely an assertion of what belongs to Stó:lō but of belonging, insisting that as his people take care of their territory they necessarily have to take care of stories and understandings of the world embedded within wider kinship relations—between communities, nations, cultures, languages, as well as with the other-than-human.

Inspired by McHalsie’s words, Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories asks participants to consider ways in which our scholarship, activism, and creative work cares for stories and centres Indigenous perspectives. In what ways can this care and attention honour Indigenous protocols and shape our pedagogies? How might writers or artists who live distanced or alienated from home territories practice such ethics? How might we consider Indigenous cultural production in cyberspace as linked to land? What does it mean to read texts through treaty documents, the history of colonization, or stories that emerge from land-theft and dislocation? What new traditions are Indigenous people, especially those who live in the city, creating?

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association supports diverse modes of creating and disseminating knowledge. Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, with at least 15 minutes for questions and discussion. In keeping with our desire to enable dialogue and community- based learning, we welcome session proposals that utilize non-standard or alternative formats. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with the following topics:

• “Taking care of everything that belongs to us,” land claims and cultural repatriation
• Stó:lō narrative arts and Stó:lō literary history, present, and future
• Politics of belonging and kinship relations
• Land, ecological responsibility, and environmental ethics
• Land-based solidarities, urban Indigenous communities, and the literary arts
• Literary methods and Indigenous protocols
• The politics of protocols—gender and surveillance
• Two-Spirit and queer Indigenous critical ecologies
• Land, stories, and narrative arts as praxis
• Autonomy and alliance in unceded traditional territories
• Community-based participatory research, pedagogies, and literary studies
• Alliances among Indigenous and diasporic artists
• Mediations of orality and Indigenous material cultures
• Collaborative creation and multi-media
• Artistic expressions of sovereignty and self-determination
• Responsibility, community, and artistic expression
• Community-specific Indigenous knowledge and ethics in scholarship or art
• methodologies and practices in Indigenous literary studies to serve the needs of Indigenous communities

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) was founded in 2014 to promote the scholarship and teaching of Indigenous writing and storytelling in Canada. One way to make our study of Indigenous literatures relevant to the writers who produce the stories we read, teach and study is to meet every other year at national conferences as part of Congress, and meet alternating years in Indigenous communities. In 2015 we met at Six Nations of the Grand River, near Hamilton, Ontario, and in 2016 we met at Congress, hosted that year at the University of Calgary. From June 18-20, 2017 we will be meeting on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples, in Chilliwack, B.C., about a half hour drive from the Abbotsford airport and about a one and a half hour drive from downtown Vancouver. This time was chosen to coincide with the annual conference of NAISA, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association meeting, at UBC from June 22-24, 2017.

Proposals are due on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 and this year’s proposals can be submitted to ilsa@sfu.ca. If you do not receive an acknowledgment of your proposal within 7 days, please contact the ILSA council members directly, especially in-coming ILSA President Deanna Reder or ILSA Secretary Sophie McCall. We remind you that prospective participants must be members in order to present at ILSA 2017 in Chilliwack.

Membership Rates are $40 (faculty) or $20 (students, community members, or underwaged) for one year. Please visit our website at
ILSA 2017 Call for Papers
http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org/membership-1/ to complete your membership.

Thank you for your continued support. Please note that for the 2016-2017 year, we will be using this email, ilsa@sfu.ca; we encourage our members to contact the ILSA Council directly should you have any concerns or ideas you wish to share.

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association Council 2016-2017
Deanna Reder, President (dhr@sfu.ca)
Jesse Archibald-Barber, President Elect (jbarber@firstnationsuniversity.ca)
Sophie McCall, Secretary (smccall@sfu.ca)
June Scudeler, Treasurer (june.scudeler@gmail.com)
Sarah Henzi, Early Career Member (sarahhenzi@gmail.com)
Angela Semple, Graduate Member (angelasemple@trentu.ca)
Sam McKegney, Past President (sam.mckegney@queensu.ca) http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org
Email: ilsa@sfu.ca