Calls for Paper/Proposal

CALL FOR PAPERS: Eleventh Conference of the International Association of Genocide Scholars

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*CALL FOR PAPERS*

*Eleventh Conference of the International Association of Genocide Scholars *

*July 16-19, 2014, Winnipeg-Canada*

*Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples*

2014 marks an important year for Winnipeg and Canada. In this year, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) will open its doors to the general public. Established by Parliament through amendments to the Museums Act on March 13, 2008, which came into force on August 10, 2008, the CMHR is envisioned as a national and international destination – a centre of learning where Canadians and people from around the world can engage in discussion and commit to taking action against hate and oppression. Also in this year, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada will release its final report, after five years of hearings and research into Canada’s history and legacy of the forced assimilation of Indigenous children through residential schools.

These momentous local developments present an opportunity for genocide scholars to visit Winnipeg and engage in discussion about colonial control over, expansion into, appropriation and settlement of Indigenous territories. Such issues raise questions of time, movement, knowledge and space in Canada and other places around the globe where Indigenous people have been victims of genocidal destruction: How do destructive processes such as genocide form and take shape over time and across space? In what ways do time, movement, territory, space, and place factor into the study of genocide? How are spaces and places mobilized in the destruction of Indigenous groups? How do the spatial and temporal aspects of colonial and settler genocide compare and contrast with those of other genocides? How does territory contribute to the persistence of groups, and from whose perspective, as well as to the mechanisms required for genocide’s redress?
How might we envision new spaces for cohabitation and reconciliation in the aftermath of, or amidst ongoing, genocidal processes? And what technological and other means do institutions such as the CMHR have available to accommodate Indigenous knowledge and authentically represent Indigenous experiences of genocide?

The University of Manitoba sits in Treaty One territory and at the crossroads of the Anishnabe, Métis, Cree, Dakota and Oji-Cree Nations.
Winnipeg is thus a fitting location for our discussions, as it is a space long marked by the movements and interactions among peoples, including the destructive movements of settler colonialism. The inauguration of the CMHR and the release of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada will further contribute to our conversations, as both will, in their own way, raise the spectre of genocide.

The conference will also feature a trip to Sagkeeng First Nation at the southern top of Lake Winnipeg, where it meets the Winnipeg River. We will be guests at Turtle Lodge (http://www.theturtlelodge.org/) and Elder David Courchene will introduce us to Anishnabe teachings as they relate to healing, survival, and resurgence. We will be announcing other stimulating conference events in the months to come.

The IAGS and the University of Manitoba welcome papers and sessions related to our conference theme of “Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples.” Innovative panels, workshops, and papers that consider the spatial and temporal issues as applied to Indigenous genocide and its commemoration are particularly encouraged, as are comparative studies.
Besides panels and papers, the organizers invite other modes of dialogue, including workshops, roundtable discussions, cultural media, artistic works/readings, and forums that relate to policy initiatives, pedagogy, and education. Scholars, practitioners, and students interested in genocide studies from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. While our theme is centered on Indigenous issues, we also encourage innovative and original papers about other genocides. As 2014 marks the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide, we are eager to accept papers on this genocide.

Papers will be accepted in English and should be sent as an attachment to the following email address: iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

Once the proposals are accepted by the selection committee, participants are required to register on-line at: www.genocidescholars.org where IAGS and conference material will be found. All participants must be IAGS members.

Please prepare your abstract for a 15 minute paper.

If you do not receive acknowledgement of receipt of your abstract within a week of submission, please contact us at: iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

You will be informed 4 weeks from the date of submission whether your paper has been accepted or not.

*Spaces may fill up, so we encourage early submissions.*

Abstracts should include full name, affiliation, a brief biography, e-mail address, and be no more than 250 words, using single-spaced in 12-point Times New Roman font. They can be sent from now until *January 17th 2014*to iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

Any questions may be directed to the conference organizers, Andrew Woolford, Adam Muller, and Donna-Lee Frieze at: iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

NMSU calls for submissions for its first Native American literary and art journal

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A group of undergraduate and graduate students at New Mexico State University are currently accepting submissions for the campus’s first Native American literary and art journal.

The publication, Tlaa: A Collective of Indigenous Expression, is an online journal encouraging indigenous students and writers, and those familiar with the indigenous community and identities, to unite and share their different ideas.  (read more)

Call For Papers Intersections 2014: Thinking|Feeling

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Call For Papers

Intersections 2014: Thinking|Feeling

March 14-15, 2014, York & Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada

Keynote by Jasbir K. Puar

Submissions Deadline: December 21, 2013

 

How do we think about the “unthinkable”? How do we explain the visceral sensations that prefigure our thoughts and actions? Intersections 2014: Thinking|Feeling is a two-day conference organized by the York-Ryerson Joint Graduate Program in Communication and Culture to be held at Ryerson University (Toronto), that will address notions of affect as a lens for critical scholarship and inquiry. We are interested in examining feelings as they blur lines between emotions, bodies and the psyche, opening up spaces for alternative modes of thought and discourse.  Affect bridges experiences from the personal to the political, and is an epistemological lens that can help us explore the depths of experience found within sensation, feelings, cognitions and objects. We seek interdisciplinary approaches that examine connections between “thinking” and “feeling” in relation to: emotion, the senses, embodiment, mental capacities, the visceral, interactivity, social interaction, media and communications technologies, intensity, sexuality and desire, social and political structures, cultural production, artistic practices and phenomenology.

Intersections 2014: Thinking|Feeling also welcomes a wide range of artwork from diverse practitioners to be exhibited as part of our annual exhibition, Cross Sections. We encourage submissions of paintings, drawings, photography, collage, sculpture, interactive works, performances, film/video projections and other marginal or intermedia forms. We are also open to papers, panel discussions, artist talks that are supported by or connected to your artistic work, please submit an abstract along with your artwork if you are interested in participating in conference sessions in this capacity.

 

Possible presentation topics include, but are not limited to:

•   Gender and Feminist Theory

•   Critical Sexuality and Queer Theory

•   Critical Race Theory

•   Disability Studies

•   Communications

•   Psychology

•   Religion and Spirituality

•   Fine Art

•   Art History

•   Cultural Studies

•   Environmental Studies

•   Literature

•   Social and Political Thought

•   Policy and Labour Studies

•   Media Studies (including Cinema and Video Games)

•   Activism

•   Philosophy

 

We are accepting proposals for participant presentations in the following categories: 15-20 minute talks; curated panels (lightning talks, longer talks, curated conversation); project demos; digital and/or print posters; creative performances; post conference workshops.

Submissions for papers and panels: Please submit a 300 word abstract or up to a 600 word panel proposal including your name, degree/department, email address, title of presentation, as well as a 200 word bio, by December 21st to intersections2014@gmail.com. Notices of acceptance will be sent in January 2013.

 

Submissions for artworks: Proposals for artworks can be submitted to cross.sections2014@gmail.com. Please submit a short summary of the work (300 words) as well as an artist bio (200 words). Include still images (max. 5 images, 1MB each) or video if desired, and be sure to specify the medium, size, year, duration (if applicable), and technical or spatial requirements for presentation. Please submit an abstract along with your work if you are interested in participating in a presentation, panel discussion or artist talk that is supported by or connected to your artistic work.

For more updates, follow us on Twitter @thinkfeel2014

Call for Presenters – Integrating Indigenous Traditional Culture and Practices in Health Care

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presented by Indigenous Gatherings

February 18th – 19th 2014 – Calgary, Alberta, CANADA

Call for Workshop Proposals – Deadline November 22nd, 2013

 

The “Integrating Traditional Indigenous Culture and Practices into Health Care Conference” is designed to facilitate the transmission of knowledge between indigenous peoples. We extend a heartfelt invitation to our indigenous partners to share knowledge that will contribute to the well-being of our Indigenous Peoples. We are also aware that many non-indigenous persons have made significant, meaningful contributions in health care delivery and we also invite these presenters to submit their proposals, provided that explicit permission of the indigenous group/organization that one is representing has been obtained.

Ultimately, each presenter is responsible for their own presentation. Please come to our conference with respect for each other. Indigenous Gatherings is promoting workshops that embrace Indigenous Knowledge. Presenters are encouraged to provide strategies that are practical and immediately applicable. All workshops will be 1–1.5 hour long including time for questions and discussions.

All presenters and co-presenters must pay registration fee. Complete and submit a separate registration form for each presenter/co-presenter.

Handouts: Power point presentations, handouts, must be pre-sent via email to  igatherings@gmail.com to be included in the Conference Binder. You will be notified on the number copies of materials for participants. Copy services will NOT be available at the site.

 

Email: igatherings@gmail.com

Website: www.indigenousgatherings.ca

CFP – Canadian Journal of Native Education

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2014 Theme Issue – CALL FOR PAPERSIndigenizing the International Academy

Deadline: April 15, 2014

The Canadian Journal of Native Education (CJNE), is pleased to announce a cooperative editorship for the 2014 CJNE theme issue with:

          Shelly Mukwa Musayett Johnson, University of British Columbia, Canada

          Jo-ann Archibald, Q’um Q’um Xiiem, University of British Columbia, Canada

          Lester-Irabinna Rigney, University of Adelaide, Australia

          Graduate students, University of British Columbia

A five-day invited international Indigenous roundtable conference was held at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver campus) in May 2013. Sponsored primarily by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, it focused on the theme, Place, belonging and promise: Indigenizing the international academy. This roundtable recognized the contested discourse, tensions, possibilities, and sites related to actions, expectations and aspirations of Indigenous faculty, post-secondary students, community activists, Elders and youth to “Indigenize the Academy”. Indigenous participants came from colonized countries such as Canada, the United States of America (USA), Australia and New Zealand, which were the last Western countries to become signatories to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The domestic and international dimensions of the roundtable added richness and extended our understandings of the challenges and possibilities of Indigenizing the International Academy.

Throughout the five days, the Indigenous roundtable participants wove five key principles of 1) legal sovereignty, 2) cultural self-determination, 3) activism, 4) rights and 5) reconciliation into their keynotes and discussions to address six core roundtable themes including: 1) Community engagement (How does the academy engage Indigenous knowledges, peoples, and communities?), 2) Teaching/learning (How does this differ between academic and Indigenous contexts?), 3) Research (How does the academy view differences between University vs Indigenous ethics, participants, data?), 4) Governance (What does this mean if the academy does not reflect an Indigenous governance process, or there are no Indigenous peoples at the governance levels in the academy?), 5) Human resources; faculty, staffing & finance (How does the academy deal with Indigenous employees vs non Indigenous employees?), 6. Indigenous student success (What does this mean from Indigenous perspectives vs academic perspectives?)

There is still much to share and learn at the local and international levels; therefore, the 2014 CJNE theme issue invites articles that will extend the examination of Indigenizing the International Academy. Articles do not have to include a comparative examination of local and international contexts; however, they must consider ways that the topic of the article can inform an international context. Questions of interest to this 2014 theme issue include, but are not limited to:

Ø What is the difference between ‘Indigenizing the Academy’ and ‘Indigenizing the International Academy’? Is either possible? How is it/could it be possible?

Ø How can the academy engage Indigenous Knowledges, peoples, and communities in meaningful ways? What are the barriers to such approaches? What are the strategies?

Ø How can a sense of belonging in the academy occur without giving up one’s Indigenous Knowledge and identity?

Ø How can university governance systems include Indigenous peoples and Indigenous approaches?

Ø In which ways can academic teaching/learning, research, and/or community service be transformed through Indigenous Knowledges, peoples, and approaches?

Please send two digital Word copies with abstract: (one digital copy to include name and contact address info and one digital copy without name and contact info for blind review) to indigenous.education@ubc.ca CJNE uses APA style. Submissions should be no longer than 8,000 words in length.

NATIVE AMERICAN & INDIGENOUS STUDIES ASSOCIATION Call for Abstracts

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NATIVE AMERICAN & INDIGENOUS STUDIES ASSOCIATION

NAISA

CALL FOR PAPERS

for the

SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING

AUSTIN, TEXAS

Hosted by the University of Texas at Austin

May 29-31, 2014

The NAISA Council invites scholars working in Native American and

Indigenous Studies to submit proposals for:

Individual papers, panel sessions, roundtables, or film screenings.

All persons working in Native American and Indigenous Studies are invited and encouraged to apply.  Proposals are welcome from faculty and students in colleges, universities, and tribal colleges; from community-based scholars and elders; and from professionals working in the field.

All those accepted to the Program must be NAISA members and must register for the meeting.

PLEASE NOTE: The Council limits submissions to one proposed session per person, in order to maximize representation at the meetings.  Each person can only be part of one proposal of any kind.  The Council reserves the right to disqualify proposals that include individuals who are part of more than one proposal.  Someone may however, be proposed to both Chair and present or Chair and commentwithin one session. Also, someone may organize a panel in which s/he does not have an active role and would be able to present a paper or chair/comment at another time in the program.

The Council may recruit panel chairs and commentators from people on successful proposals.

GO TO naisa.org for more information

about NAISA and the Austin 2014 meeting or email:NAISA2014UTAUSTIN@GMAIL.COM

DEADLINE for proposal submission: NOVEMBER 15, 2013