Calls for Paper/Proposal

CFP – Canadian Journal of Native Education

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2014 Theme Issue – CALL FOR PAPERSIndigenizing the International Academy

Deadline: April 15, 2014

The Canadian Journal of Native Education (CJNE), is pleased to announce a cooperative editorship for the 2014 CJNE theme issue with:

          Shelly Mukwa Musayett Johnson, University of British Columbia, Canada

          Jo-ann Archibald, Q’um Q’um Xiiem, University of British Columbia, Canada

          Lester-Irabinna Rigney, University of Adelaide, Australia

          Graduate students, University of British Columbia

A five-day invited international Indigenous roundtable conference was held at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver campus) in May 2013. Sponsored primarily by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, it focused on the theme, Place, belonging and promise: Indigenizing the international academy. This roundtable recognized the contested discourse, tensions, possibilities, and sites related to actions, expectations and aspirations of Indigenous faculty, post-secondary students, community activists, Elders and youth to “Indigenize the Academy”. Indigenous participants came from colonized countries such as Canada, the United States of America (USA), Australia and New Zealand, which were the last Western countries to become signatories to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The domestic and international dimensions of the roundtable added richness and extended our understandings of the challenges and possibilities of Indigenizing the International Academy.

Throughout the five days, the Indigenous roundtable participants wove five key principles of 1) legal sovereignty, 2) cultural self-determination, 3) activism, 4) rights and 5) reconciliation into their keynotes and discussions to address six core roundtable themes including: 1) Community engagement (How does the academy engage Indigenous knowledges, peoples, and communities?), 2) Teaching/learning (How does this differ between academic and Indigenous contexts?), 3) Research (How does the academy view differences between University vs Indigenous ethics, participants, data?), 4) Governance (What does this mean if the academy does not reflect an Indigenous governance process, or there are no Indigenous peoples at the governance levels in the academy?), 5) Human resources; faculty, staffing & finance (How does the academy deal with Indigenous employees vs non Indigenous employees?), 6. Indigenous student success (What does this mean from Indigenous perspectives vs academic perspectives?)

There is still much to share and learn at the local and international levels; therefore, the 2014 CJNE theme issue invites articles that will extend the examination of Indigenizing the International Academy. Articles do not have to include a comparative examination of local and international contexts; however, they must consider ways that the topic of the article can inform an international context. Questions of interest to this 2014 theme issue include, but are not limited to:

Ø What is the difference between ‘Indigenizing the Academy’ and ‘Indigenizing the International Academy’? Is either possible? How is it/could it be possible?

Ø How can the academy engage Indigenous Knowledges, peoples, and communities in meaningful ways? What are the barriers to such approaches? What are the strategies?

Ø How can a sense of belonging in the academy occur without giving up one’s Indigenous Knowledge and identity?

Ø How can university governance systems include Indigenous peoples and Indigenous approaches?

Ø In which ways can academic teaching/learning, research, and/or community service be transformed through Indigenous Knowledges, peoples, and approaches?

Please send two digital Word copies with abstract: (one digital copy to include name and contact address info and one digital copy without name and contact info for blind review) to indigenous.education@ubc.ca CJNE uses APA style. Submissions should be no longer than 8,000 words in length.

NATIVE AMERICAN & INDIGENOUS STUDIES ASSOCIATION Call for Abstracts

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NATIVE AMERICAN & INDIGENOUS STUDIES ASSOCIATION

NAISA

CALL FOR PAPERS

for the

SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING

AUSTIN, TEXAS

Hosted by the University of Texas at Austin

May 29-31, 2014

The NAISA Council invites scholars working in Native American and

Indigenous Studies to submit proposals for:

Individual papers, panel sessions, roundtables, or film screenings.

All persons working in Native American and Indigenous Studies are invited and encouraged to apply.  Proposals are welcome from faculty and students in colleges, universities, and tribal colleges; from community-based scholars and elders; and from professionals working in the field.

All those accepted to the Program must be NAISA members and must register for the meeting.

PLEASE NOTE: The Council limits submissions to one proposed session per person, in order to maximize representation at the meetings.  Each person can only be part of one proposal of any kind.  The Council reserves the right to disqualify proposals that include individuals who are part of more than one proposal.  Someone may however, be proposed to both Chair and present or Chair and commentwithin one session. Also, someone may organize a panel in which s/he does not have an active role and would be able to present a paper or chair/comment at another time in the program.

The Council may recruit panel chairs and commentators from people on successful proposals.

GO TO naisa.org for more information

about NAISA and the Austin 2014 meeting or email:NAISA2014UTAUSTIN@GMAIL.COM

DEADLINE for proposal submission: NOVEMBER 15, 2013