Events

SAGE Saturday – Publishing Pathways November 25th @ SFU Harbour Centre

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Do you have questions about publishing? Would you like to learn about the submission process for journals and book chapters? Please join us for the November SAGE Saturday at the SFU Harbour Centre (515 West Hastings St. Vancouver, BC) from 10-4.

The event will be hosted as a workshop, allowing you to develop your potential publishing piece and create a plan for submission. Please email questions about the publishing process to Michelle_pidgeon@sfu.ca to help us develop the workshop ahead of time.

 

Save The Date: March 3, 2018, 16th Annual Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS)

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The 16th Annual Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS) will be hosted at UBC Vancouver in the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the Musqueam people. The Call for Papers will be going out soon, with an anticipated submission deadline of January 15th, so save the date and start preparing your presentations!

If you are interested in helping to organize IGSS, please email SAGE at grad.sage@ubc.ca The first planning meeting will occur Thursday November 16th at the UBC longhouse (joining via Skype is also an option), and we are always grateful for help on the day of the event.

SAGE Peer Writing Group

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Friday November 3rd, 24th and December 8th  (1:00-3:30pm)

Held at UBC Vancouver, the peer writing group is an opportunity to participate in semi-structured writing time, with a faculty advisor and peer support to help you reach your publishing goals. Coffee and light snacks provided!

Writing group

SAGE Coffee and Catch Up

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Wednesday Mornings (10:00-11:30) at the UBC Longhouse, join us for free coffee and an opportunity to  meet other Indigenous graduate students

Coffee And catch up

SAVE THE DATE: Forum on Indigenous Graduate Students and Mentorship at UBC – Aug 17, 2017

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Mark your calendars for – A Forum on Mentoring Indigenous Graduate Students at UBC

Open to faculty, staff and graduate students*.

Date: August 17th, 2017

Place: First Nations House of Learning

Time: 12 noon to 2 pm.

Opening address by Distinguished Professor Hingangaroa Smith, Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi, followed by a panel of Indigenous scholars and students, led by Dr. Jo-anne Archibald, Q’um Q’um Xiiem, Professor, University of British Columbia. Introduction by Dean Susan Porter, Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies.

UBC has a stated commitment to Aboriginal education and to respect for Aboriginal knowledge and cultures, as well as a resolution to build upon the strengths of the university to more fully address the needs of Aboriginal and Indigenous communities in British Columbia, Canada, and the world.

Within these commitments, what is our academic responsibility to Indigenous graduate students at UBC, particularly in relation to UBC’s priorities for this next century? How do we enact this responsibility across the institution?

Organized by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies with support from the First Nations House of Learning, The Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund and The Equity Enhancement Fund.

*A complete description with registration information will be sent out in July.

For questions, please contact Theresa Rogers: theresa.rogers@ubc.ca

Financial Planning Webinar for Indigenous Students at UBC

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UBC Enrollment Services is hosting financial wellness sessions next week.

The ESP Aboriginal Financial Team will be hosting the following session:

Financial Planning Webinar for Aboriginal Students
Date: Tuesday June 27, 2017
Time: 10:00am – 11:00am (PDT)
A recording will be made available for students via the link below after the session takes place.

Enrolment Services is also hosting a general financial planning webinar for all students. If any students you speak with are not able to make the session above they are certainly welcome to attend either of these sessions:

Making a Financial Plan
Date: Wednesday June 28, 2017
Time: 10:00am – 11:00am (PDT)
Date: Thursday July 6, 2017
Time: 4:30pm – 5:30pm (PDT)

Registration details for these sessions can be found here: https://students.ubc.ca/enrolment/finances
Once students register for a session, they’ll receive a confirmation email confirming the details.

Sites of Survivance – A Global Symposium on Indigenous Street Gangs, August 23rd, 2017

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The University of Calgary, Department of Sociology invites you to join researchers, community experts, and partners from western Canada, New Zealand, and Australia for a one-day symposium on Indigenous street gangs.

Topics to be discussed include violence, addictions, trauma, and healing. This symposium will be of interest to anyone who works with families and communities impacted by Indigenous street gang violence.

Date: August 23rd, 2017

Cost: $25

Location: University of Calgary, Alberta room – Dining Centre

To register or for more information please contact: robert.henry1@ucalgary.ca

You can find the poster here: Sites of Survivance Poster

 

Eighth American Indian/Indigenous Teacher Education Conference, June 15-17th, 2017

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Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA June 15-17th, 2017

Northern Arizona University’s College of Education will host its Eighth American Indian / Indigenous Teacher Education Conference on June 16-17, 2017, with a reception on the evening of June 15. This conference for preschool, K-12, college, and university educators and concerned community members is designed through panels, workshops, and papers to share ideas for improving the lives and education of Indigenous children. Northern Arizona University’s College of Education has worked with Indian Nations to improve the education of American Indian students for decades. It has hosted a variety of American Indian teacher and administrative preparation programs, including the well received Learn In Beauty program, and published a number of monographs, including Honoring Our Children: Culturally Appropriate Approaches for Teaching Indigenous Students and Honoring Our Elders: Culturally Appropriate Approaches for Teaching Indigenous Students. Drs. Joseph Martin and W. Sakiestewa Gilbert, who have been long involved in working to improve Indian education, are co-chairing the conference. To get updated information on next year’s conference when it becomes available join the Indigenous-L list serve at http://list1.ucc.nau.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=indigenous-l&A=1. Continuing education credit is available for conference attendees.

For more information, please see: http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~jar/AIE/AIITEC8.html

 

 

Shelagh Rogers: Bearing Witness to the Transformative Testimonies of Residential School Survivors, at 6:30pm on April 27th, 2017

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Part of the Department of History’s 2016-2017 lecture series, Canada 150: Confederation in Question

This is a free event and is open to the general public. 

RSVP to the Shelagh Rogers lecture April 27, 2017

ABSTRACT

Highly acclaimed CBC radio personality and honorary TRC witness Shelagh Rogers will discuss the impact of hearing hundreds of residential school survivors speak at national and regional events of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. The real history of Canada was not taught to generations of Canadian school children. But Indigenous Peoples lived it. What does reconciliation mean now that Canada knows the truth of their experience?

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Over the years as a journalist on flagship programs such as MorningsideSounds Like Canada and This Morning, Shelagh Rogers has traveled the length and breadth of this country, interviewing thousands of Canadians and collecting their stories.

She is currently the host and a producer of the CBC Radio program The Next Chapter, devoted to Canadian writers and songwriters. She has received many awards for speaking publicly about a private story: a decades-long battle with depression. Shelagh holds honourary doctorates from the University of Western Ontario (2002), Mount Allison University (2011) in New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador’s Memorial University (2012).

In September 2011, Shelagh was named an Officer of the Order of Canada, the country’s highest civilian honour, for promoting Canada’s rich culture, for her volunteer work in adult literacy, for fighting against the stigma of mental illness, and for pushing for reconciliation. She is the first-ever Ambassador-at-Large for the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough and sees the canoe as a beautiful symbol of a new relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

In the last few years, she has committed herself to working toward that reconciliation from coast to coast to coast. She plans to devote herself to reconciliation for the rest of her life. Native Counseling Services of Alberta has given her their Achievement in the Aboriginal Community award. She is also proud to be chosen as an “Honourary Witness” to the brave and essential work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

As Shelley Ambrose, publisher of The Walrus Magazine, says: Think of her as Canada’s ear. Then add a brain, a heart…and a very recognizable voice. That’s Shelagh Rogers.

For more information, please see: https://www.sfu.ca/history/events/lectures/canada-150/shelagh-rogers-canada-150.html