Events

The BC Infant and Early Childhood Court Team (IECCT) Conference – May 15 – 16, 2017

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Judges and lawyers routinely face making life-altering, best interest decisions about infants and young children who have experienced significant adverse experiences and are at risk for devastating long-term outcomes. This conference is a unique opportunity to learn from and engage with internationally-recognized experts (including judges, lawyers, and infant mental health clinicians) from evidence-based court teams developed in the USA. Working together we will build on and adapt these model programs for implementation in the Canadian context and, in British Columbia, to create the BC Infant and Early Childhood Court Teams (IEECTs).
 
A limited number of tuition bursaries to partially cover registration fees are available for professionals and service providers working with children and families who would otherwise not be in a position to attend.
 
Date: May 15 – 16, 2017
Location: Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites, Vancouver
 
Early bird registration deadline: April 7, 2017

 

Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation, Pre-symposium and Symposium events – March 15-18, 2017.

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Pre-Symposium Event: Landsdowne Lecture with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

March 15th 5:00 pm, First Peoples House, Ceremonial Hall

Hosted by the Department of Political Science

Freedom Sings: Land/Bodies/Resurgence

This talk will explore Indigenous resurgence and nationhood through story, song and video. Leanne will discuss resurgence as an ongoing intervention into the colonial project by sharing works from her recent album f(l)ight (RPM Records), her new book of short stories This Accident of Being Lost (House of Anansi) and her forthcoming academic work on the The Radical Resurgence Project (UMP Press). More information about Leanne Simpson.

See poster

Symposium: Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation March 15-18, 2017

  • This symposium will bring together many prominent Indigenous scholars in the fields of Political Science, Law and Indigenous Governance to consider the long intellectual tradition of Indigenous resurgence within these fields while looking toward new directions in consideration of the challenges and possibilities produced in the era of reconciliation. The aim in hosting this event is to cultivate an environment for productive discussion of a central concern facing Indigenous resurgence: our relationships with creation (land, water, animals, ancestors) and how these relationships have been impacted by reconciliation politics.

Speakers: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, Dian Million, Sheryl Lightfoot, Christine O’Bonsawin, Taiaiake Alfred, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Hunt, Aimee Craft, Audra Simpson, Hayden King, Nick Claxton, Hokulani Aikau, Daniel Heath Justice. This event will take place at the University of Victoria at the First Peoples House from March 15th to 18th 2017. No registration is required, and the event is free.

More info…

 

Truth Before Reconciliation: Reframing/Resisting/Refusing Reconciliation. 6-8pm, March 10, 2017

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Truth Before Reconciliation: Reframing/Resisting/Refusing Reconciliation March 10th, 2017

 

  • While much academic and public discourse since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) final report has and continues to emphasize reconciliation, there is also deep skepticism about a process of reconciling that so readily glosses over truth-telling. Centering the truth as it relates to the TRC is essential to any meaningful processes of reconciliation in Canada. The inspiration for focusing on truth in this context comes from Dr. Sarah Hunt’s response to Senator Murray Sinclair at an event hosted at Green College at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in March 2016. Dr. Hunt is Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) and Assistant Professor of Critical Indigenous Geographies and First Nations and Indigenous Studies at UBC.

 

Speakers: Patricia M. Barkaskas and Sarah Hunt and the event will take place on Friday March 10th from 6-8pm in room 1900 at the SFU Harbour Centre. This event is free but registration is required. The registration portal will open on February 24th.

The Reconciliation Industry: Land Dispossession and Extractivism in an Age of Official Contrition. 6-8pm, Feb 21, 2017.

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The Reconciliation Industry: Land Dispossession and Extractivism in an Age of Official Contrition Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

 

  • Reconciliation has become the watchword of this era of relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. In part that’s because the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has made important contributions to the public understanding of residential schools. But for the Canadian government and industry, what does the rise of reconciliation discourse entail? Is reconciliation a shape-shift in ongoing colonization? What kind of reconciliation is possible if the crime is still in progress?

 

Speakers: Martin Lukacs and Khelsilem and the event will take place on Tuesday, February 21st from 6-8pm in room 1800 at the SFU Harbour Centre. This event is free but registration is required. Please click on the link for more information.

Beyond The Women’s March: Inclusive and Intersectional Organizing – 6-8 pm, Feb 20, 2017.

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Beyond The Women’s March: Inclusive and Intersectional Organizing February 20th, 2017

 

  • This is a follow-up to the event (Women’s Marches in Washington and Vancouver), local organizers are holding a public discussion to deconstruct elements of the white-centric feminism that led to much of the poor representation witnessed at the March. The panelists—including individuals who attended and did not attend the March—will share their ideas on how to move forward as we continue to organize and build on the movement, with inclusivity and intersectionality at the forefront.

 

This event will take place on Monday, February 20th, 2017 from 6-8pm at the Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 W. Hastings St. Vancouver, Unceded Coast Salish Territories

CFP – Gdo Akiiminaan Ganawendandaan (Taking Care of Our Land) Symposium. Due: February 22, 2017.

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  • The Anishinaabe Initiative Division and the Department of Geography and Geology at Algoma University will be holding the 2nd Bi-Annual Symposium on Gdo Akiiminaan Ganawendandaan (Taking Care of Our Land), on May 9-11 2017 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. The purpose of this symposium is to explore, through research and best practices, the inclusion of cultural and traditional practices of land management, planning and use for Aboriginal communities in Northern Ontario. The theme for this year is Reconciliation.

 

The deadline for abstracts is set for midnight on February 22nd, 2017. For more information, please click on the link.

 

Two-Spirit Events at Talking Stick Festival, Feb. 16 – 23rd

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2Spirit Rebellion
Join us for a night of rebellion as the Brush Arbor Gurlz demonstrate the resilience of two-spirit people.
February 17th, 20179:00 PM

Odyssey Bar & Nightclub
686 W Hastings St, Vancouver, BC V6B 1P1Price: $15Purchase tickets HERE.Harsh words too often erode the confidence of two-spirit people but for some, drag is used to denote their strength.

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Two-Spirit Intersection(s) and Connection(s)

Exploring the space between and within Two-Spirit: performance, politics and community organizing.  

Tuesday February 21

1PM – 4PM

Roundhouse Arts and Recreation Centre – Exhibition Hall

181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

Join us for an afternoon of Two-Spirit conversations exploring the history of the Two-Spirit tradition(s) followed by a panel discussion of distinguished Two-Spirit performers exploring the intersection of Two-Spirit identify, performance, politics and community organizing.

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War Paint: Drag Queens Prepare For Battle

The Brush Arbor Gurlz (BAGz) invite you to join them for a drag workshop. 

February 21, 2017
7:00 PM

Roundhouse Performance Centre
181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

The BAGz see drag as a way to transcend gender and express themselves politically through their performance art.  They will demonstrate their transformation process with makeup, lashes and wigs while discussing Native issues, Two-Spirit identity, performance pieces, inspirations and empowerment by their alter egos.

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AMP it UP – Aboriginal and Two-Spirit Media Training

Join us for AMP it UP, a practical, hands-on, media training/workshop to develop, strengthen and support work with media outlets. 

Saturday  February 25

10am – 1PM

Holiday Inn & Suite Downtown Vancouver

1110 Howe St, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1R2

Wouldn’t it be great if we had a personal publicist or a PR firm to manage and support our communication and media needs? Media outlets—newspapers, magazines, radio stations, television and Internet-based media/sites are important ways to inform a broad range of people about information, messages, issues, activities and events. Media is also an important tool in moving and shaping public opinion, discussions and conversations when done correctly.

 

Building Legal Colonialism: Liberal Enclosure and Indigenous Self-Determination. 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Jan 10, 2017

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Building Legal Colonialism:
Liberal Enclosure and
Indigenous Self-Determination

An Inaugural Lecture at the
Peter A. Allard School of Law

Professor Gordon Christie’s research focuses on questions of Aboriginal rights. He has published on many of the signal decisions in Canadian Aboriginal law, from Delgamuukw to Tsilhqot’in Nation, and his work explores a broad range of issues, including Aboriginal rights and title, Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and processes of consultation and accommodation. As an Indigenous scholar, Professor Christie has been an important voice as well in the development of thinking on Indigenous legal traditions. His most recent project involves an attempt to move beyond the dominant mode of critical analysis with respect to Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal rights, which relies on and champions particular, but often conflicting, normative theories of the law to analyse court decisions. His forthcoming book, Making Sense of Aboriginal Rights: An Exercise in Methodological Naturalism, explores the question of how the nature of the law might be theorized in a way that allows for a non-normative description and explanation of the dynamics of Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal questions, in terms of the actions of one meaning-generating community—the settler state and its legal institutions—with relation to numerous and varied Indigenous meaning-generating communities.

Professor Christie joined the Allard School of Law at UBC in 2004, serving as Academic Director of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program from 2005 to 2016. Prior to coming to Allard Law he held a faculty appointment at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University), where he was also Director of the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments. He obtained B.A. in Philosophy from Princeton University, followed by an LL.B. from the University of Victoria and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Barbara. At the Allard School of Law, he teaches in the areas of aboriginal law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as first-year Torts.

TUESDAY
JAN 10, 2017
5:30 – 6:30PM
Allard Hall,
Franklin Lew Forum
The Inaugural Lecture tradition at the Allard School of Law celebrates the promotion of faculty members to full Professor with a public lecture addressed to the broad themes of their scholarly work.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP
Peter A. Allard School of Law
The University of British Columbia
Allard Hall, 1822 East Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
T 604.822.6335
http://www.allard.ubc.ca

An Afternoon of Dance: Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum. Due: 12:30 – 2:30pm, Jan 9, 2017

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An Afternoon of Dance with

Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum

January 9th 2017

12:30 – 2:30pm

Sty-Wet-Tan Hall, UBC Longhouse, 1985 West Mall

Following the performances, open conversation with Dallas Arcand, Madelaine McCallum and Filmmaker, Darcy Muenchrath.
Everyone is welcome.Afternoon_of_Dance_poster.jpg

CFP – Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories – Indigenous Literary Studies Association Conference. Due: Jan 31, 2017

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Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories: ILSA’s Annual Conference

this year held at the Stó:lō Nation Teaching Longhouse 7201 Vedder Road, Chilliwack on the Unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to join us in generating new conversations about protocols, pedagogies, land, and stories from a wide variety of perspectives, including tribally-centred, inter-tribal, pan-national, urban/suburban, and trans-Indigenous, at ILSA’s third annual gathering, this time taking place on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples in the Stó:lō Teaching Longhouse in Chilliwack, B.C. In a 2007 essay Stó:lō historian Dr. Albert Sonny Naxaxalhts’i McHalsie shares a Halq’emélem statement that is often interpreted as an assertion of Aboriginal rights and title: “S’ólh Téméxw te ikw’elo. Xolhmet te mekw’stam it kwelat,” which can be translated as “This is our Land. We have to take care of everything that belongs to us” (85). As McHalsie reflects on the boundaries of his territory, he follows the protocols of his community, consulting his elders to uncover teachings embedded in the Halq’emélem language and in Stó:lō stories. Through these protocols he replaces Western concepts of ownership with Stó:lō understandings of personal connection to place, sharing stories that explicate multiple ways of reading the land around him. McHalsie concludes that the statement is not merely an assertion of what belongs to Stó:lō but of belonging, insisting that as his people take care of their territory they necessarily have to take care of stories and understandings of the world embedded within wider kinship relations—between communities, nations, cultures, languages, as well as with the other-than-human.

Inspired by McHalsie’s words, Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories asks participants to consider ways in which our scholarship, activism, and creative work cares for stories and centres Indigenous perspectives. In what ways can this care and attention honour Indigenous protocols and shape our pedagogies? How might writers or artists who live distanced or alienated from home territories practice such ethics? How might we consider Indigenous cultural production in cyberspace as linked to land? What does it mean to read texts through treaty documents, the history of colonization, or stories that emerge from land-theft and dislocation? What new traditions are Indigenous people, especially those who live in the city, creating?

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association supports diverse modes of creating and disseminating knowledge. Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, with at least 15 minutes for questions and discussion. In keeping with our desire to enable dialogue and community- based learning, we welcome session proposals that utilize non-standard or alternative formats. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with the following topics:

• “Taking care of everything that belongs to us,” land claims and cultural repatriation
• Stó:lō narrative arts and Stó:lō literary history, present, and future
• Politics of belonging and kinship relations
• Land, ecological responsibility, and environmental ethics
• Land-based solidarities, urban Indigenous communities, and the literary arts
• Literary methods and Indigenous protocols
• The politics of protocols—gender and surveillance
• Two-Spirit and queer Indigenous critical ecologies
• Land, stories, and narrative arts as praxis
• Autonomy and alliance in unceded traditional territories
• Community-based participatory research, pedagogies, and literary studies
• Alliances among Indigenous and diasporic artists
• Mediations of orality and Indigenous material cultures
• Collaborative creation and multi-media
• Artistic expressions of sovereignty and self-determination
• Responsibility, community, and artistic expression
• Community-specific Indigenous knowledge and ethics in scholarship or art
• methodologies and practices in Indigenous literary studies to serve the needs of Indigenous communities

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) was founded in 2014 to promote the scholarship and teaching of Indigenous writing and storytelling in Canada. One way to make our study of Indigenous literatures relevant to the writers who produce the stories we read, teach and study is to meet every other year at national conferences as part of Congress, and meet alternating years in Indigenous communities. In 2015 we met at Six Nations of the Grand River, near Hamilton, Ontario, and in 2016 we met at Congress, hosted that year at the University of Calgary. From June 18-20, 2017 we will be meeting on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples, in Chilliwack, B.C., about a half hour drive from the Abbotsford airport and about a one and a half hour drive from downtown Vancouver. This time was chosen to coincide with the annual conference of NAISA, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association meeting, at UBC from June 22-24, 2017.

Proposals are due on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 and this year’s proposals can be submitted to ilsa@sfu.ca. If you do not receive an acknowledgment of your proposal within 7 days, please contact the ILSA council members directly, especially in-coming ILSA President Deanna Reder or ILSA Secretary Sophie McCall. We remind you that prospective participants must be members in order to present at ILSA 2017 in Chilliwack.

Membership Rates are $40 (faculty) or $20 (students, community members, or underwaged) for one year. Please visit our website at
ILSA 2017 Call for Papers
http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org/membership-1/ to complete your membership.

Thank you for your continued support. Please note that for the 2016-2017 year, we will be using this email, ilsa@sfu.ca; we encourage our members to contact the ILSA Council directly should you have any concerns or ideas you wish to share.

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association Council 2016-2017
Deanna Reder, President (dhr@sfu.ca)
Jesse Archibald-Barber, President Elect (jbarber@firstnationsuniversity.ca)
Sophie McCall, Secretary (smccall@sfu.ca)
June Scudeler, Treasurer (june.scudeler@gmail.com)
Sarah Henzi, Early Career Member (sarahhenzi@gmail.com)
Angela Semple, Graduate Member (angelasemple@trentu.ca)
Sam McKegney, Past President (sam.mckegney@queensu.ca) http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org
Email: ilsa@sfu.ca