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Intertextual Reading Group with Glen Coulthard. 1-2pm, March 8, 2016

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You are invited to join Dr. Glen Coulthard, who will read from his critically acclaimed book, Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition (University of Minnesota Press, 2014). Intertextual: Art in Dialogue is an ongoing reading group held across a range of visual art institutions in Vancouver that takes place between January and October 2016.

Dr. Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and part of the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at UBC. He has written and published numerous articles and chapters in the areas of Indigenous thought and politics, contemporary political theory and radical social and political thought.

Tuesday, March 8, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, UBC

Volunteer Chaperones Wanted: Kirkness Science Camp

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Volunteers chaperons wanted: Evenings of May 15th to morning of May 20th
 
Kirkness Science Camp will be hosting about 16 Aboriginal students from across Canada at UBC May 16th to 20th.  They are looking for about 4 volunteer chaperons to joins from about 4:30 to 9:30 am in the morning.  This will mean lodging with students at Vanier for the week.  It will include meals for the week and lodging.  The days for the volunteers will be free to enjoy at beautiful UBC Vancouver campus.  Volunteers must be 21 or older and fill out a criminal records check form (through Kirkness there will be no charge for the criminal check form to the volunteer).
 
Please contact Carolyn Kenny with questions.  See more about the camp here: http://www.vernajkirkness.org/

Summer Course: Place-based learning in Huu-ay-aht Territory

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Summer Course: Place-based learning in Huu-ay-aht Territory

This intensive two-week course (Jul 24 to Aug 4) offered by the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre will give undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to engage directly in the emerging realm of place-based learning. The course is structured around foundational questions, such as, “How are people and place connected in ecologically unique landscapes?” and “What can we learn from the relationship between land, water, history, and contemporary revitalization efforts in the region?” Instructor: Dr. Tracy L. Friedel (UBC).

On-campus info sessions:

Wed, Feb 3, 5 – 6:30 PM, Room BIOL 2200
Thur, Feb 4, 5 – 6:30 PM, Room BUCH B210

For more information, email Meylin Zink Yi or call 604-728-3256.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 1, 2016

Public Lecture by Daryl Baldwin on February 22 – “Feature Speakers” Lecture Series. 11:30am, Feb 22, 2016

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We are delighted to announce that Daryl Baldwin is the next guest in the Future Speakers lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts. 

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His lecture, entitled “toopeeliyankwi, kati myaamiaataweeyankwi: We Succeed At Speaking The Myaamia Language,” will take place on Monday, February 22 at 11:30am in the Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall at the First Nations Longhouse. A free catered lunch will follow his talk at 1pm.
We would be grateful if you could help promote this event through your networks. We’ve attached the poster and digital signage.

Best regards,
The Faculty and Staff at the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program



The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Future Speakers” highlights both the struggles and the successes of Indigenous language revitalization and looks to a future where these languages are not only spoken, but thrive. The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Film and Discussion: Jingle Dress – First Dance. Jan 12, 12:30-2:30pm

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 Jan 12 Film The Jingle Dress
Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission recently delivered its final report (TRC, 2015). In efforts to respond and support the report’s Calls to Action, I hope you might find time to join us for a viewing of the film, Jingle Dress – First Dance, on Tuesday January 12th from 12:30 to 2:30 in Scarfe 100. The film will be followed by a discussion with Indigenous film maker and PhD student, Jules Koostachin, and Indigenous director, James Buffin. 


Please see the attached poster and share with your students and colleagues. 

Jingle Dress – First Dance chronicles Cree, Attawapiskat filmmaker, Jules Koostachin’s six-year quest to dance at a pow wow for the
first time in a sacred healing Jingle Dress. Jules’ journey honours her mother who was held against her will as a child for ten years
in the Canadian Native Residential School system and her grandmother who didn’t understand that the horrific, abusive system
was a deliberate tool of assimilation.

This event is co-sponsored by the Indigenous Pedagogies Themed Network at the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality, and Social Justice

Indigenous Speakers Series: Top Down vs. Community-Driven: Indigenous Health Policy In Canada. NOV. 25, 2015, 9 am–12 pm

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Dr. Shannon Waters and Dr. Pierre-Gerlier (PG) Forest will share their extensive experience with the development and implementation of Indigenous health policy in Canada. Presenters will discuss the roles of traditional knowledge, politics, community-driven approaches and research & surveillance in the development of Indigenous health programming and Indigenous health policy at federal and provincial levels. As Indigenous peoples reclaim their health, and with the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care (the Romanow Report), the presenters will discuss the complexities that arise when efforts are made to incorporate multiple voices in the creation of Indigenous health policy from the grassroots level.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25

9:00am – 12pm

Franklin Lew Forum

Allard School of Law 1822 East Mall, Vancouver, BC

Register at our website: health.aboriginal.ubc.ca

 

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Research Commons Workshops for November

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Good Afternoon,

We have been working hard to add services to the research commons that will help UBC’s graduate students even more.  At the end of October and going forward we added a new writing group that will offer feedback and support for graduate students to help them start and keep a writing habit.  This is in addition to all of our other continuing services.

Thank you for all of your help in passing this information along!

Here is the newsletter link:
http://koerner.library.ubc.ca/services/research-commons/research-commons-newsletter/

With gratitude,

Mark Christensen
Student Coordinator
Koerner Library Research Commons
mark.christensen@ubc.ca