CFP: Stonybrook 10th Annual Graduate Ethnography conference: Making the Invisible visible

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CFP: Underhill 20th Annual Graduate Student Colloquium: WHO IS YOUR SOURCE? HISTORIANS AS RECEIVERS OF KNOWLEDGE

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CFP: The Crypt(ic)

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The Crypt(ic)

Institute for Comparative Literature and Society – Annual Graduate Student Conference

Columbia University, New York

March 29, 2014

Keynote speaker: Gail Scott (Université de Montréal)

“The distortion of a text resembles a murder: the difficulty is not in perpetrating the deed, but in getting rid of its traces.” Freud, Moses and Monotheism.

The architectural crypt is the site of sacred relics situated outside of the space of religious practice. It is the foundation that is permanently hidden from view, its animating sanctity alien to the rituals of worship that it legitimates. Exegesis begins with a death that is the crypt of writing. For Freud, this distortion of text is both a transformation and a displacement: the transformation of lived memory into a documentary apparatus and its displacement to a site of repetition and reproduction. What escapes the “bottleneck of the signifier” is rendered spectral – a ghostly presence haunting the regimes of meaning.

The Crypt(ic) proposes to explore the spaces rendered obscure by regimes of signification, yet constitutive of both the content and the delimitation of meaning. The social and political articulate this relationship. For Marx, there is no value without surplus and no labor without estrangement; the obscure precedes and delineates its normative condition. The categories of (non-surplus) value and (unalienated) labor are the particular, perhaps illusory, conditions of a cryptic generality. Likewise, the political as the contestation of power is obscured from politics as the instantiation of power. A mind trained in the globalized humanities towards reading the (social) text of the past and of our own time can try to break the code that conceals the crypt(ic) from plain view, perhaps putting it in a position where it itself encrypts again: the question remains how to wrestle with this double bind in an ever-unfinished attempt to change its course, to put it to work.

We welcome papers that explore obscurity, estrangement, concealment, and displacement across the humanities and the social sciences. To consider conditions in which the hidden precedes the particular necessarily disrupts disciplinary boundaries. Papers might consider the constitution of “the other” within the construction of normativity; practices of the archive or of digitalization within the humanities; alienation and estrangement in political, economic, and social theory; the uncanny, the occult, and the monstrous in art and literature; subalternity as conditioned by the history of (post)coloniality and globality; the (in)visibility of the race, class, and (heteronormative) gender lines; repression, abreaction, and parapraxis in psychoanalytic theory; or the role of chaos or the abyss in metaphysics and epistemology. We likewise welcome discussion of the hidden or obscure in contemporary theory such as, but not limited to, Rancière’s Dissensus,Castoriadis and Lefort’s notions of the political, Derrida’s Parergon, Deleuze’s Body without Organs, or recent reassessments of Fanon and Beauvoir.

Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to iclsgradconf@gmail.com by January 15, 2014.

CFP: Chicago Ethnography Conference 2014

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Call for Abstracts

16th Annual Chicago Ethnography Conference

The Department of Sociology at Northwestern University is pleased to announce the 16th Annual Chicago Ethnography Conference. This annual graduate student conference is hosted on a rotating basis by one of several Chicago-area Sociology departments, including DePaul University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Loyola University, Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, University of Notre Dame, the University of Chicago, and University of Illinois at Chicago. The conference provides an opportunity for graduate students to share their ethnographic scholarship with one another and get feedback from faculty and other graduate students based in the Chicago area and beyond. This year’s conference will be held at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL on March 15th, 2014.

Graduate students in all academic disciplines are invited to present their original ethnographic research. While preference will be given to those who have conducted substantial fieldwork, interviewing methods are acceptable. Papers in all substantive areas are welcome.  The theme of this year’s conference is cultural production and reproduction. In addition to topics that relate to the theme, graduate students are welcome to submit work on topics including but not limited to: class, crime, education, ethnicity, gender, family, globalization, health and illness, immigration, medicine, methodology, performance ethnography, race, religion, sexualities, social movements, technology, urban poverty, and work and employment.

Plenary Speakers
Nina Eliasoph is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern California. Eliasoph’s research explores volunteer work, civic engagement, and grassroots political activism. Her first book, Avoiding Politics: How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life (1998, Cambridge University Press) depicts the culture of political avoidance in American civic life. In her second book, Making Volunteers: Civic Life after Welfare’s End (2011, Princeton University Press), Eliasoph uncovers what role volunteers play for civic and community organizations and the consequences of relying on short-term volunteers. Her recent Politics of Volunteering (2012, Polity Press, Cambridge) explores broader consequences of volunteering for the participants, recipients of aid, and society.

Ashley Mears is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Her first book, Pricing Beauty: The Making of a Fashion Model (2011, University of California Press), examines the production of value in fashion modeling markets and analyzes how cultural production markets become sites for the reproduction of cultural inequalities. Her current research explores the global context of culture and beauty in elite nightclubs.

Abstract Submissions
To submit an abstract, please complete the online submission form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1JPhJhpCL7lLHShGPrEyeAT6aTi9hRUSq9ZLXXLfRkqM/viewform

The abstract should not exceed 250 words. The deadline for submissions is January 15th, 2014. All presenters will be notified of acceptance by February 1st. Participants will be asked to submit their full papers to the conference committee by March 1st.

Please circulate this announcement to graduate students who may be interested!

Edited Collection: Call for Chapter Abstracts

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Due: January 15, 2014 

Towards a Transformative Approach to Gender and Food Security in Low-Income Countries 

Editors 

John R. Parkins, University of Alberta, jparkins@ualberta.ca

Jemimah Njuki, International Development Research Centre, jnjuki@irdc.ca

Amy Kaler, University of Alberta, akaler@ualberta.ca

Introduction 

Gender inequity is linked to food insecurity. Research shows that women are at the heart of agricultural processes, carrying out the majority of the agricultural and agro-processing labor. For instance, in Tanzania, women account for about 50% of the total waged agricultural labor force (FAO 2011), but even this figure severely understates women’s contributions because of the unaccounted and unpaid hours women work at home producing and processing food production for their families. Constraints on women are therefore roadblocks toon food and nutrition security. When women have equal access to productive resources and assets, everyone benefits. For example, a study in Ethiopia found that women who were provided with the same level of productive resources as male farmers increased their yields by 22% (Boon, Ogato and Subramani 2009). Similarly, the Food and Agriculture Organization (2011) suggests that equal distribution of assets would increase food productivity by 20-30% and reduce the number of hungry people by close to 17%. In response to such findings, national governments and donors have directed funding to research and development programs which integrate gender into research and which set gender equity as an explicit goal of interventions.

Such interventions can address both practical and strategic gender interests (UNESCO 2005, Molyneux 1985). In practical terms, these interventions can provide women with the capacity to meet the long-term nutritional needs of their households, and to enhance their economic well-being. In strategic terms, these interventions may have the potential to enhance the transformation of gender relations towards greater equity by enabling women and men to reflect on gendered divisions of labor and resources related to food, and to reshape these divisions in ways which benefit families and communities. Research and interventions using such an approach aims to facilitate more gender-equitable relationships between men and women and address the underlying social, structural and political causes of gender inequality. Such

transformative approaches contrast with analytical approaches that simply identify barriers or tabulate numbers of men and women involved in project activities. The process of engagement with strategic gender interests is not well established, and is still emergent in the realm of agriculture.

This collection aims to document the ways that food security interventions have addressed both practical and strategic gender interests by: documenting the ways that food security and gender inequity are conceptualized within interventions, assessing the impacts and outcomes of gender-responsive programs on food security and gender equity; and extending the global conversation on gender and food security in the direction of strategic and transformative practices.

In 2009, Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada launched the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) to increase the contribution of Canadian and developing country research expertise toward solving global problems of food insecurity through applied, collaborative, results-oriented research. To date, the Fund has supported 21 large applied agriculture and nutrition research consortia in 20 countries.

The idea for this collection arose from CIFSRF’s goal to find ways to ensure that women contribute to and benefit from food security programs and interventions, and that its projects contribute to gender equity, as well as enabling communities to meet their nutritional needs. This call for abstracts is directed primarily at projects funded by IDRC, although the editors will consider contributions from other research and intervention projects.

We invite contributions which address the lessons learned from implementing food security interventions with concern for gender equity, as well as contributions which consider how agriculture and nutrition interventions might lead to transformations in gender relations.

Scope of this collection 

The first part of the collection will contain conceptual and methodological papers and best practices for integrating gender considerations in agriculture, food and nutrition security. The second part will include empirical case studies which present evidence on the outcomes and impacts of food security interventions on women and men across the global south. The third part, looking towards the future, will focus on policy, research and programming implications of bringing gender transformative approaches into the mainstream of agriculture and food security research interventions.

We are seeking papers which address the following questions:

Part 1: Concepts and Strategies: 

 What conceptual / theoretical approaches to gender and food security can lead to changes in both practical and strategic gender interests?

 How does strategic or transformative research differ from business-as-usual (or purely analytical) approaches to studying gender?

 What challenges and limitations affect the integration of gender equity into agriculture and food security research programs?

 What controversies or sensitivities can emerge in the context of gender-sensitive interventions?

 How can we integrate strategic or transformative gender concerns into detailed empirical analysis?

Part 2: Case Studies and Practical Results 

 What key approaches have been used for addressing gender interests in agriculture and food security programs?

 What have been the outcomes and impacts of using these approaches? What have been the changes in food and nutrition security, livelihoods and gender equity?

 How are gender-sensitive research and interventions introduced and received at the grassroots?

 What do specific cases tell us about the opportunities, challenges and limitations of addressing gender inequities through research and intervention in food security? What can we learn from successful and not-so-successful efforts to address gender inequities in agriculture and food security research?

Part 3: Towards the Future: 

 Can gender relations be transformed through research and intervention?

 What would a 21st century agenda for gender equity in food security look like?

 What are the limits to research and intervention in transforming communities?

 How can funders, implementers, researchers and community members find common ground on gender transformation?

 What kind of partnerships and capacities will be required for the implementation of a gender transformative agenda in food security research?

Guidelines for contributions 

We are seeking contributions of extended abstracts (2-3 pagers) for papers that are based on practical, strategic or transformative aspects of gender and food security. For field research and practical case studies, we welcome papers that address how gender is integrated in agriculture and food security research programs and that report evidence of outcomes and impacts on gender equity, food and nutrition security and livelihoods. The papers should also have practical implications for policy, practice and research.

Papers will be reviewed based on:

 Clear demonstration of relevance of the paper to food security challenges of men and women

 Clear demonstration of innovativeness in methods and approaches and extent to which the paper advances knowledge or addresses knowledge gaps on gender and food security

 Conceptual soundness

 Robustness of methodology, research design and quality of evidence

 Contributions of the research to food security, gender equality and empowerment of women

Chapter abstracts are due on January 15th 2014. 

Abstracts submission is open to IDRC funded food security programs and others working on gender, agriculture and food security. Preference will be given to IDRC funded programs, although manuscripts from non-IDRC funded and commissioned chapters will also be considered.

Following the abstract deadline, the editors will notify the authors of the chosen abstracts. Authors will be invited to present complete first drafts of their papers (5,000 – 7,000 words) at an international conference and a writer’s workshop sponsored by CIFSRF and the University of Alberta in May 2014. Invited authors will receive travel support to attend this conference / workshop. The editors will work with selected authors to revise their drafts towards final versions.

The editors plan to submit the collection to an academic press by the end of August 2014 with a potential publication date of March 2015.

Send abstracts to John Parkins (jparkins@ualberta.ca)

Sponsorship 

The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) is a program of Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD).

Good Read-Fracking protest leads to bigger debate over indigenous rights in Canada

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Fracking protest leads to bigger debate over indigenous rights in Canada

by Benjamin Shingler @benshingler December 10, 2013 5:00AM ET

A single campaign in the country’s smallest province is now a flashpoint for land rights of First Nations communities

Web Based Link:

MONTREAL — It’s a single shale gas exploration project in one of Canada’s smallest provinces, but it has become a flashpoint in the debate over indigenous land rights in the country.

What began this summer in a small encampment near the Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick has triggered a broader movement with a groundswell of support across the country.

After protesters in New Brunswick set up another blockade last week on a highway near a seismic testing site, demonstrations were held in solidarity in cities across the country. Activists contend this is only the beginning of a lengthy battle in New Brunswick – and part of a larger fight over the stewardship of the country’s natural resources.

Elsipogtog — along with the Mi’kmaq indigenous who are part of that nation — has come to represent the struggle for indigenous self-determination, land rights and environmental protection, said Clayton Thomas-Muller, an activist and organizer of the aboriginal movement Idle No More, which took hold last year in Canada.

“It very quickly could set off a firestorm given the current political climate in Canada with Idle No More,” Thomas-Muller said

For now, protesters in Elsipogtog expect a period of quiet, at least over the holiday season.

SWN Resources, a shale gas testing company based in Texas, announced last Friday it had completed its initial round of testing.

Protesters report the company’s high-powered, specialized trucks have left the area and its workers have gone home

But no one is under the impression the company is gone for good.

Read Complete Story here

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE

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IETC 2014
CHICAGO – USA
3-5 September 2014http://www.iet-c.net

Call for papers

IETC 2014 seeks a diverse and comprehensive program covering all areas of educational technology. The program includes a wide range of activities designed to facilitate the exchange of expertise, experience, and resources with colleagues. These include keynote and invited talks, full and brief paper presentations, panels and round table discussion sessions.

We would like to invite you to share your experience and your papers with academicians, teachers and professionals. 

Conference Language

The official languages of the conference are English and Turkish. Proposals can be sent and be presented in either language. But all submission proccess will be done in English. Please, submit your proposal according to the following presentation category descriptions in paper guidelines.

Conference Venue

IETC 2014 will be held at American Islamic College, AIC Campus 640 W. Irving Park Rd. Chicago, IL, USA.

Deadlines

Abstract Deadline : Until July 5, 2014

Full Article Deadline : Until July 20, 2014

Registration Fee Deadline : Until August 5, 2014