Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples

Facing ‘colonial history’ key for Indigenous youth: Crime Prevention Ottawa

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Broader cultural education could help steer Indigenous youth away from criminal justice system, author says

CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:54 PM ETLast Updated: Feb 14, 2017 8:53 PM ET

Melanie Bania presented the results of her study on preventing the criminalization of Indigenous youth at Ottawa City Hall on Tuesday. (Giacomo Panico/CBC )

A renewed focus on broader cultural education that confronts rather than ignores Canada’s “colonial history” could help steer Indigenous youth away from the criminal justice system, according to a new report by Crime Prevention Ottawa.

The report, titled Culture as Catalyst: Preventing the Criminalization of Indigenous Youth, was released during a presentation at Ottawa City Hall Tuesday morning.

Marc Maracle is the chair of the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, which helped lay the groundwork and provide background information for the report. (Roger Dubois/CBC)

According to the report, traumatic events stemming from “colonizing policies” such as the residential school system contribute to the disproportionately high rates of poverty, poor education and unsafe housing experienced by Indigenous people in Canada.
As a result, the paper concludes, Indigenous youth and adults are highly over-represented in the Canadian criminal justice system.
“The research also shows that a connection to culture is very important for all young people, but that for Indigenous people in particular that connection to culture is directly linked to their sense of identity,” said Melanie Bania, the report’s author. Read More…

Researcher targets ‘glaring’ gaps in indigenous health care

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Carrie Bourassa takes reins of Institute of Aboriginal People’s Health
010217_Carrie_Bourassa

Dr. Carrie Bourassa is the new scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health, which is based at Health Sciences North’s Research Institute. Supplied photo.

The “glaring” health gaps between indigenous people and the rest of Canada is widening, says the new scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health.

“It’s pretty bleak,” said Dr. Carrie Bourassa, who took over the position Feb. 1.

The institute is being established in Sudbury with the Health Sciences North Research Institute, where researchers are engaged in cutting-edge research on healthy aging, cancer care, infectious diseases, precision medicine and northern and Indigenous health. It’s the first time an Institute has been established outside of a large urban centre.

Bourassa’s role, among many others, will be to train and mentor new scholars in indigenous health research, and to make sure research creates opportunities to close those gaps.

“From diabetes to HIV and AIDS to suicide rates, we really need to get a handle on the underlying impact,” Bourassa said.

Most of the issues stem from the intergenerational trauma associated with the ongoing impact of colonization, she said. Researchers can’t seem to get a handle on the complex ways those underlying social detriments interact.

She said she knows the solution can be found in communities, because they are the ones who understand the issues better than anyone else. Read More…

 

Pickard, Aaron. Researcher targets ‘glaring’ gaps in indigenous health care. February 17, 2017. Retrieved from: https://www.sudbury.com/local-news/researcher-targets-glaring-gaps-in-indigenous-health-care-525752

Archaeology, Education, and American Indian Initiatives Paid Internships at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center Due: March 1st, 2017.

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Crow Canyon Archaeological Center – Archaeology, Education, and American Indian Initiatives Paid Internships
 
Crow Canyon Archaeological Center is currently accepting applications (application deadline is March 1st, 2017) for archaeology, education, and American Indian Initiatives internships. We are seeking advanced undergraduate or graduate students in archaeology, anthropology, Native American studies, or other related fields to assist with archaeological field and lab work or educational programming related to the archaeology and anthropology of the Southwest. We are especially interested in pursuing Indigenous and Public Anthropology projects and programs, and seek to cultivate interns that can contribute to this vision. If you know of anyone that might be interested in these paid internships please pass the contact information and details along to them.

More information and application materials can be found at: http://www.crowcanyon.org/index.php/internships

 

Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation, Pre-symposium and Symposium events – March 15-18, 2017.

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Pre-Symposium Event: Landsdowne Lecture with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

March 15th 5:00 pm, First Peoples House, Ceremonial Hall

Hosted by the Department of Political Science

Freedom Sings: Land/Bodies/Resurgence

This talk will explore Indigenous resurgence and nationhood through story, song and video. Leanne will discuss resurgence as an ongoing intervention into the colonial project by sharing works from her recent album f(l)ight (RPM Records), her new book of short stories This Accident of Being Lost (House of Anansi) and her forthcoming academic work on the The Radical Resurgence Project (UMP Press). More information about Leanne Simpson.

See poster

Symposium: Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation March 15-18, 2017

  • This symposium will bring together many prominent Indigenous scholars in the fields of Political Science, Law and Indigenous Governance to consider the long intellectual tradition of Indigenous resurgence within these fields while looking toward new directions in consideration of the challenges and possibilities produced in the era of reconciliation. The aim in hosting this event is to cultivate an environment for productive discussion of a central concern facing Indigenous resurgence: our relationships with creation (land, water, animals, ancestors) and how these relationships have been impacted by reconciliation politics.

Speakers: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, Dian Million, Sheryl Lightfoot, Christine O’Bonsawin, Taiaiake Alfred, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Hunt, Aimee Craft, Audra Simpson, Hayden King, Nick Claxton, Hokulani Aikau, Daniel Heath Justice. This event will take place at the University of Victoria at the First Peoples House from March 15th to 18th 2017. No registration is required, and the event is free.

More info…

 

Funding – Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in American Indian and Indigenous Studies. Due: March 1, 2017

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  • This fellowship is offered by Michigan State University and the deadline to apply is March 1st, 2017. The award period is July 1st through June 2018. The fellowship provides office space, access to Michigan State University’s outstanding library and computing facilities, connections with American Indian and Indigenous studies faculty, benefits for the year, and a substantial stipend.

 

The deadline to apply is March 1st, 2017 and the person of contact for this fellowship is Dr. Dylan AT Miner, adminer@msu.edu.

CFP – Gdo Akiiminaan Ganawendandaan (Taking Care of Our Land) Symposium. Due: February 22, 2017.

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  • The Anishinaabe Initiative Division and the Department of Geography and Geology at Algoma University will be holding the 2nd Bi-Annual Symposium on Gdo Akiiminaan Ganawendandaan (Taking Care of Our Land), on May 9-11 2017 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. The purpose of this symposium is to explore, through research and best practices, the inclusion of cultural and traditional practices of land management, planning and use for Aboriginal communities in Northern Ontario. The theme for this year is Reconciliation.

 

The deadline for abstracts is set for midnight on February 22nd, 2017. For more information, please click on the link.

 

Job – Program Coordinator, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care, P/T Position. Due: Feb 13, 2017 –

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Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care

Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care
Part-Time Contract Position

Are you passionate about protecting B.C.’s ocean and wilderness and keeping B.C.’s public land and water wild forever? Are you excited by the opportunities and challenges that come with working in a complicated social and political landscape with a myriad of views on the best solutions?

CPAWS-BC is seeking a dynamic Program Coordinator to lead the creation of a new a CPAWS-BC program, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care. Based at the CPAWS-BC office in Vancouver, the Program Coordinator will be responsible for coordinating and executing all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth In Care Program. The Program Coordinator ensures the smooth delivery of the program objectives and positive participant experience while maintaining partner relationships and administrating the day to day project tasks. The Program Coordinator will work closely with the Executive Director and Community Engagement Coordinator.
The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, BC Chapter (CPAWS-BC) is one of Canada’s oldest non-profit conservation groups. We protect wilderness in every corner of BC and deep into the ocean. We have been protecting BC’s nature since 1978 and are dedicated to keeping BC’s public land and water wild forever. We need help protecting wilderness in every corner of B.C. and deep into the ocean. Is that you?
CPAWS-BC’s hiring practices give priority to Aboriginal people and people who face barriers to employment. We encourage applications from former youth in the foster care system and Indigenous people living in BC.
Key Responsibilities:

Community Engagement

  • Build, manage and maintain relationships with program partners to further program objectives;
  • Coordinate all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program, including assisting youth participants with problem solving and planning, as well as evaluating and reporting on the program;
  • Recruit youth in or who have transitioned out of the foster care system to join the Youth Advisory Committee;
  • Coordinate and complete administrative tasks relating to program activities;
  • Facilitate Youth Advisory Committee meetings, workshops, and presentations in both indoor and outdoor settings;
  • Lead outdoor activities (e.g. hiking, snowshoeing, canoeing, etc.)
  • Create and implement the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program using feedback from the Youth Advisory Committee and social service organization;
  • Track expenditures and manage program budget; and
  • Serve as an ambassador for the organization, leaving all with a positive perception if the organization and its staff.

Monitoring and Evaluation

  • Ensure the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program has a clear strategy, deliverables, and assessment tools (to measure success); and
  • Regularly report back on program using reliable metrics and evaluation tools.

Core Requirements/ Competencies:

  • Problem solver and solutions based thinker, who is able to demonstrate a passion for community engagement
  • Must have a strong understanding of privilege and oppression and how it impacts community engagement/community work in the context of youth in the foster care system
  • Experience in planning and program management, including goal setting, determining strategies to move a program forward, create and implement action plans, manage budgets, and monitor and evaluate programs in order to report on deliverables
  • Flexibility/ adaptability. Tolerant of a constantly changing work environment and adjust quickly to changing priorities and conditions
  • Experience facilitating workshops for youth and adults
  • Experience leading outdoor activities
  • Community organizing

 

Qualifications:

  • 2 years experience working with vulnerable populations or at-risk-youth in an outdoor setting
  • Experience in the fields of environmental stewardship, environmental education, and curriculum development is considered an asset
  • Experience with Microsoft Office suite
  • A valid class 5 (or higher) driver’s licence without restrictions
  • A clear criminal record with respect to working with youth and vulnerable populations (the actual criminal check will be done using our system after the interview – do not do in advance)
  • Ability to work in Canada, without restrictions

Additional Asset Criteria:

  • Lived experience with the Foster Care system
  • Additional fluency in languages other than English
  • Experience working in the NGO/ENGO sector
  • A passion for conservation work
  • An ability to work in a fast paced, high distraction environment
  • Being extremely well organized

Note: This position may include working with vulnerable people and therefore a successful Criminal Records Check will be required. CPAWS-BC will conduct the records check for the successful candidate. Please do not apply for a Criminal Records Check in advance of being offered the position as CPAWS-BC has a specific system that we are required to use.

Location and working environment: This is a six month part-time, 20 hours per week, contract position at CPAWS-BC’s downtown Vancouver office. Our work environment appeals to self-directed, flexible team players who have excellent interpersonal skills. Our office is close to multiple transit options and we have an open, hard-working, fun, and creative team environment.

Compensation: Compensation starts at $20 per hour and increases on a scale commensurate with the experience of the successful candidate.

Preferred start date: Late February or Early March, 2017

 

Application Process

Applications: Please send a cover letter and resume with the subject line: “Program Coordinator Position” to the attention of the CPAWS-BC Hiring Committee at hiring@cpawsbc.org. No phone calls or inquiries please.

Please ensure that your cover letter indicates how you meet the CPAWS-BC’s Core Requirements and Qualifications, as well as how your past experience will make you successful with this position’s Key Responsibilities.

Deadline: 13 February 2017, at 11:59pm

Please note that we will not be able to respond to applicants until after the deadline, with the exception of an auto-response that you will receive immediately to indicate that your application has been received.

For more information on CPAWS-BC visit our website at www.cpawsbc.org and sign-up on our mailing list, or connect with us on Twitter and Facebook: cpawsbc

Building Legal Colonialism: Liberal Enclosure and Indigenous Self-Determination. 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Jan 10, 2017

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Building Legal Colonialism:
Liberal Enclosure and
Indigenous Self-Determination

An Inaugural Lecture at the
Peter A. Allard School of Law

Professor Gordon Christie’s research focuses on questions of Aboriginal rights. He has published on many of the signal decisions in Canadian Aboriginal law, from Delgamuukw to Tsilhqot’in Nation, and his work explores a broad range of issues, including Aboriginal rights and title, Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and processes of consultation and accommodation. As an Indigenous scholar, Professor Christie has been an important voice as well in the development of thinking on Indigenous legal traditions. His most recent project involves an attempt to move beyond the dominant mode of critical analysis with respect to Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal rights, which relies on and champions particular, but often conflicting, normative theories of the law to analyse court decisions. His forthcoming book, Making Sense of Aboriginal Rights: An Exercise in Methodological Naturalism, explores the question of how the nature of the law might be theorized in a way that allows for a non-normative description and explanation of the dynamics of Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal questions, in terms of the actions of one meaning-generating community—the settler state and its legal institutions—with relation to numerous and varied Indigenous meaning-generating communities.

Professor Christie joined the Allard School of Law at UBC in 2004, serving as Academic Director of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program from 2005 to 2016. Prior to coming to Allard Law he held a faculty appointment at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University), where he was also Director of the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments. He obtained B.A. in Philosophy from Princeton University, followed by an LL.B. from the University of Victoria and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Barbara. At the Allard School of Law, he teaches in the areas of aboriginal law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as first-year Torts.

TUESDAY
JAN 10, 2017
5:30 – 6:30PM
Allard Hall,
Franklin Lew Forum
The Inaugural Lecture tradition at the Allard School of Law celebrates the promotion of faculty members to full Professor with a public lecture addressed to the broad themes of their scholarly work.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP
Peter A. Allard School of Law
The University of British Columbia
Allard Hall, 1822 East Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
T 604.822.6335
http://www.allard.ubc.ca

An Afternoon of Dance: Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum. Due: 12:30 – 2:30pm, Jan 9, 2017

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An Afternoon of Dance with

Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum

January 9th 2017

12:30 – 2:30pm

Sty-Wet-Tan Hall, UBC Longhouse, 1985 West Mall

Following the performances, open conversation with Dallas Arcand, Madelaine McCallum and Filmmaker, Darcy Muenchrath.
Everyone is welcome.Afternoon_of_Dance_poster.jpg

Funding – Aboriginal Graduate Fellowships, Due: Feb 10, 2017

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The University of British Columbia offers multi-year fellowships to Master’s and doctoral Aboriginal students. Award winners are selected on the basis of academic merit through an annual competition, administered by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in consultation with the First Nations House of Learning. Approximately a dozen new fellowships are offered each year. All Aboriginal students are eligible to apply, but priority is given to Aboriginal graduate students whose traditional territory falls, at least in part, within Canada. Applicants may or may not be UBC graduate students at the time of application – the competition is open to both incoming and continuing graduate students.

 

Applicant Deadline: check with your graduate program

Graduate Program Nomination Deadline: February 10, 2017 (4 PM)

Amount: $16,175 – $18,200 per annum plus tuition

For complete information about this competition, please see the Graduate Awards website: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/aboriginal-graduate-fellowships

The contact at the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies for this competition is Angela Rizzo (angela.rizzo@ubc.ca).