Academia

Funding – Creating Humanities Communities Grant, National Endowment for the Humanities. Due: Feb 15, 2017

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Please see the grant announcement below.  NEH is looking to fund projects and programs in key “incentive areas” which include Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.  These projects can and should be collaborations between an institution, such as a university or university program, and a community entity, like a tribal community or tribal program.  The grants are smaller in nature due to their matching requirement, but matching funds can be raised over the course of three years.  NEH staff is available for consultation throughout the application process.  Please consider applying and pass along to others in these states for their consideration.  Application Deadline is February 15, 2017. 

 

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced Creating Humanities Communities, a new grant that supports grassroots humanities programs by encouraging partnerships and collaborations between multiple institutions or organizations in a town, county, region, or area. NEH hopes that the relationships built and strengthened through Creating Humanities Communities will lead to increases and improvements in humanities infrastructure for years to come, even beyond the initial activities funded by these grants.

 

Lecturer (non-tenure), Environmental Studies, University of Redlands, California

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ANNOUNCEMENT OF FACULTY POSITION OPENING UNIVERSITY OF REDLANDS

Lecturer Environmental Studies September 23, 2016 Open until filled

The University of Redlands (www.redlands.edu) Department of Environmental Studies invites applications for a non-tenure-track Lecturer position in Environmental Studies.

We seek applicants broadly trained in environmental studies with experience in the teaching and praxis of some combination of environmental impact assessment, GIS applications in environmental management, environmental land-use planning, and other applications of environmental analysis and management. Applicants should demonstrate an ability to (1) enrich interdisciplinary offerings on campus through courses; and (2) thrive in an undergraduate program within a small private liberal arts university, where excellence in teaching and advising is highly valued. The successful applicant will have the ability to teach some combination of courses such as introduction to environmental studies, global environmental change, environmental impact assessment, project-oriented classes using GIS, and land- use planning.

The department will value applicants who have experience working with students from diverse cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Applicants are asked to identify their strengths and experiences in assisting diverse student populations to accomplish curricular goals. The successful applicant will be expected to support the College of Arts and Science’s new general education curriculum.

The University of Redlands is a private, comprehensive liberal arts institution located 60 miles east of Los Angeles in a town of 70,000. The campus is surrounded by orange groves and sits at the base of the San Bernardino Mountains, one hour from the coast, and 40 miles west of Palm Springs.

Desired/Preferred Qualifications: A Masters degree in a relevant environmental field is required, though a Ph.D. is preferred. Desirable qualifications for this position include: a broad base of knowledge in environmental studies with specialization in writing and conducting environmental impact assessment, and GIS. Teaching load is 8 courses per year. There is the possibility of student advising reducing the teaching load, and one of those courses may be a travel course or field-intensive course during our month-long May term.

To Apply: Applicants should send a letter addressing their teaching interests, current CV, at least three letters of reference, evidence of teaching effectiveness, and a sample of professional writing to Apply@redlands.edu. Limit attachments to 11 MB or less.

In compliance with the American with Disabilities Act, if selected for the interview process and accommodations are needed, please call (909) 748-8040.

SUBMISSION OF A CURRICULUM VITAE OR APPLICATION INDICATES AGREEMENT THAT THE UNIVERSITY MAY VERIFY ANY AND ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED THEREIN

MEMBERS OF UNDERREPRESENTED GROUPS ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Department Chair, Arizona State University, American Indian Studies Program

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Department Chair (JOB #11784)
Arizona State University
American Indian Studies Program
 
The American Indian Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe Campus, invites applications for Director, with a concurrent appointment as tenured Professor. The anticipated start date is July 1, 2017.
 
The American Indian Studies Program (AIS) is a leading undergraduate and graduate degree program among Southwestern research universities.  AIS offers B.S. and M.S. degrees, an undergraduate minor, and houses the Wicazo Sa Review:  A Journal of Native American Studies. AIS scholarship and teaching focus on tribal sovereignty, cultural integrity, and identity of the American Indian nations and peoples. AIS faculty are embedded in Indigenous communities, work cooperatively with other departments and programs across the campus, engage in a national and international network of professional associations and consultancies, and are dedicated to providing access, retaining, and graduating American Indian students and students of all backgrounds in a climate that is welcoming and respectful of their languages and cultures. Located on the Tempe Campus, ASU’s American Indian Studies is centered among twenty-one Arizona Indian nations, within a large urban Native population, and a growing university enrollment of more than 1,200 American Indian students from Arizona and elsewhere, making it a dynamic location to examine and address Indigenous issues. 
 
The successful candidate will be committed to creating a learning environment conducive to critical and creative thought by and across ASU’s diverse student, faculty, and community populations, and will work to advance an ambitious vision to:
  • Be among the Top 5 American Indian Studies programs in the world
  • Provide models and research to demonstrate the value and relevance of American Indian Studies scholarship in support of American Indian nations, organizations, leadership, and community
  • Develop the growth of the graduate program
 
Reporting to the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences through the Dean of Social Sciences, the Director will provide administrative leadership and academic vision, and will engage the faculty in shaping a productive, collegial environment that advances unit goals and objectives. The Director will also provide strong leadership in fiscal planning and administration, donor development and relations, the promotion of scholarship and external funding, development and implementation of strategic diversity initiatives related to faculty, staff and students, and in the exploration and development of opportunities for collaboration within and beyond the university.
 
Minimum Qualifications
·         Terminal degree in American Indian Studies or related field
·         A scholarly record commensurate with the rank of tenured Professor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (advanced Associate Professors may be considered for expedited promotion to full in advance of start date)
·         Demonstrated success in an administrative/leadership capacity
 
Desired Qualifications
·         Demonstrated work experience with interdisciplinary fields, tribal communities, community-based research, alumni and donor relations
·         A record of externally-funded research
·         Research focus in law, policy, decolonizing methodologies, governance, arts, economic development, traditional knowledge systems, cultural and intellectual property rights, or sustainability 
·         Demonstrated success meeting the needs of diverse student populations and/or reaching out to diverse communities
 
To apply, please submit to Alicia.Richardson@asu.edu as a single PDF document: a letter of interest which outlines qualifications, a curriculum vitae, and contact information including email for three references. References may be contacted at a later stage of the search and only with the candidate’s approval. Initial deadline for receipt of complete applications is November 18, 2016; if not filled, complete applications will be reviewed each week thereafter until the search is closed. A background check is required for employment.
 
Arizona State University is a VEVRAA Federal Contractor and an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will be considered without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other basis protected by law. https://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html and https://www.asu.edu/titleIX/

Tenure-Track Job Openings, UNLV English Department

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The UNLV English Department is searching for three tenure-track positions. Please follow the links to the right for more information about these positions. For information about the university’s diversity profile, please click on the “UNLV Diversity Fact Sheet” link.

UBC Single Mothers Support Group

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Are you a single mother attending UBC? Are you looking to connect with other single mothers on campus who share your experience of balancing work, studying and parenting schedules? A new group was created for single mothers on campus with the support of the YWCA, UNA and UTown@UBC.

Please see the tentative schedule below and please contact Aurelia Kinslow with any questions: aurelia.kinslow@ubc.ca.

Thank you,

Aurelia Kinslow

 

Tentative Schedule

Place: Old Barn Community Centre (attached to Bean Around the World)

Date (Friday 5:30-7:30pm) notes
Jan meetings Jan 6
Jan 27
Feb meetings Feb 10
Feb 24
March meetings Mar 17 (spring break week)
Mar 31
April Meetings Apr 14 Good Friday
Apr 28
May meetings May 12
May 26

CFP – Curriculum Matters: Race, Place, and Belonging “South” of the Border, Due: Dec 11, 2017

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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF CURRICULUM STUDIES ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Monday, April 24 – Thursday, April 27, 2017

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: AAACS 2017

University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

 

Priority Deadline: Sunday, December 11, 2016

Cut-Off for Submissions:  Sunday, January 8, 2017


Curriculum Matters: Race, Place, and Belonging “South” of the Border

Curriculum matters.  Race matters.  Place matters.  Epistemologies matter. And matter also matters of indigeneity, immigration and epistemicide—of the South, at the borders, and beyond.  Through this year’s conference theme—inspired, too, by the place of our convening and work of our colleagues (t)here; we invite participants to inquire, critique, ponder, dream, converse and create together through and from attention to these matters.  Herein, we aim to not only continue from last year conversations regarding our ethical, and historical, engagements (AAACS 2016), but also to further those of our affiliate and sister organizations respecting the current tasks of the curriculum theorist (IAACS 2015), where curriculum theory and its labor, in fact, stand in the present moment (Bergamo 2016)—as well as in those to come; and demands to “colour” curriculum, interrogating places therein of power, privilege and supremacy (C&P 2016).  We, too, seek responsiveness to/in a contemporary scene wherein much is contested, conflicted, complexified, and produced as nonexistent among us, particularly perhaps in the U.S./”America”, as pertains to race, place, indigeneity, immigration and epistemology—especially concerning difference, equity, solidarity and social and cognitive justice; and possibly no more so than in the “othered” South.

For example, while restorations of particular nations of the Global North have been acknowledged and taken up—and this, via the curriculum—in Canada, which necessarily involves listening to and learning from indigenous knowledges (the fruit of which was so beautifully shared at IAACS 2015), as well as in Australia (the place of our upcoming IAACS 2018 convening); such efforts are virtually nonexistent in the US, where one could argue indigeneity is largely still rendered invisible and thus inarticulable.  And we suffer still in this context without any redress—with even much repressive regress—respecting generations of racial violence, suffering and oppression.  Such questions too might be brought to bear at the borders, as it were, liminal spaces and fluid if not fractured places wherein epistemologies of the South, and of language and of citizenship, are deeply implicated, and such also with respect to education, curriculum and pedagogy.

We welcome, of course, as always, proposals on any current curriculum studies scholarship, and encourage provocative, stimulating and surprising conference formats; critical and creative conversations among us that may initiate healing and transformation, and illumine new paths and possibilities for us from within our midst.

 

Proposals are being accepted through

AAACS 2017 Proposal Guide

To submit your proposal, please follow the link: https://goo.gl/forms/EPUE2pKTZstyHObh1

For questions/inquiry regarding the conference and/or call for proposals, please email conference and program committee email at: AAACScallforproposals@gmail.com

Your proposal automatically registers you as a member of AAACS—there are presently no dues.  With membership in AAACS (www.aaacs.org) comes membership in IAACS (The International Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies).

 

 

Indigenous Governance Program Manager, University of Arizona

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Over the last 20 years, the Native Nations Institute (NNI) and the Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program (IPLP) have made the University of Arizona a leader in the field of Indigenous nation building.
As part of the University’s Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, NNI carries out research and works with Native nations and organizations to support Indigenous self-determination, to strengthen Indigenous governance capacities, and to achieve Indigenous community and economic development objectives. As part of the University’s James E. Rogers College of Law, the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program (IPLP) is a center for innovation in research, training, and advocacy in Federal Indian Law and the international law of Indigenous Peoples.
In 2013, NNI and IPLP came together to create the Indigenous Governance Program (IGP). Through the IGP, practitioners and scholars from around the world have access to the research and teaching of NNI’s and IPLP’s renowned faculty in the fields of Indigenous governance and Indigenous rights. The IGP includes the possibility of individuals earning: a Masters of Professional Studies in Indigenous Governance (UA credit); a Professional Certificate in Indigenous Governance (UA credit); a Continuing Education Certificate in Indigenous Governance (non-UA credit); certificates of completion in a number of distance-learning course offerings; and/or the option of taking any combination of live and distance-learning courses for personal enrichment.

Assistant Professor of Native American History, University of North Carolina – Pembroke

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The University of North Carolina at Pembroke invites applications for a tenure-track position in American Indian History. The position will be a the rank of Assistant Professor. The successful candidate will teach a variety of advanced courses in Native American history, contribute to the general education survey load in the department by offering a two-course introductory sequence in Native American history, and periodically teach an historical methods course. Of particular interest to us are candidates whose focus is on Native Americans of the Southeastern United States. Area of specialization within the field is open, but additional consideration will be given to those applicants who can develop courses with an emphasis on gender and sexuality. The new faculty member will join the History Department and have opportunities to collaborate with faculty in American Indian Studies as well as the Southeastern American Indian Studies Program. Applicants must earn a Ph.D. in History by August 2017. The UNCP History Department expects faculty to demonstrate a strong commitment to teaching and to be actively engaged in professional scholarship and university service.

Assistant Professor of Native History, Northern Arizona University

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The department of History at Northern Arizona University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of History specializing in Native /Indigenous North America.  The appointment begins fall of 2017.  In keeping with the department’s mission, we are looking for a colleague who demonstrates the ability to undertake teaching and scholarship focusing on indigenous histories in a global context.  The successful candidate will be expected to offer courses in Native American/Indigenous history at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and contribute to other courses required by the department for its majors.  Preference will be given to scholars whose research and teaching can also contribute to the department’s thematic strengths at the graduate level, which at present include Global/Comparative history; Environment & Health; Colonialism and Nationalism; Class, Race, & Ethnicity; Gender & Sexuality; and Public History.

 

 

Upcoming Final Doctoral Examinations

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FRIDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 2016 – 9:00AM – FIRST NATIONS LONGHOUSE, BOARDROOM, 1985 WEST MALL

Rhonda Elaine Elser
Department: Educational Studies
Aboriginal Parental Engagement in Calgary Catholic Schooling

WEDNESDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 2016 – 12:30PM – ROOM 200

Sara Florence Davidson
Department: Language and Literacy Education
Following the Song of k’aad’aww (Dogfish Mother): Adolescent perspectives on English 10 First Peoples, Writing, and Identity