Academia

Assistant, Associate or Professor – Educational Equity

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FACULTY POSITIONS IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH WITH A FOCUS ON EDUCATIONAL EQUITY
The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) invites applications from scholars who do qualitative research with a focus on educational equity, for one or more faculty positions at the rank of Assistant Professor of Education, Associate Professor of Education (untenured), or Professor of Education.
We seek candidates who have strong training in education or a social science discipline and who conduct qualitative research on educational equity and/or policies, programs, or practices designed to promote educational equity, from pre-K to postsecondary education. Scholars who focus on race/ethnicity, immigration, gender, and/or class, and who study the role of education in promoting or inhibiting social mobility are welcome. We are particularly interested in appointing new colleagues whose research is concerned with improving educational opportunities for disadvantaged populations either in the U.S. or in international contexts. Strong applicants will be distinguished by the quality of their research, their use of rigorous qualitative methods, and the salience of their work to policy and practice.  We also seek candidates who have the potential to make a powerful substantive contribution to our curriculum, particularly the teaching of qualitative methods. We especially encourage applications from women and minorities.
At HGSE, our mission is to conduct high-quality research on issues related to education, and to teach, advise, and mentor a diverse community of graduate students, both at the doctoral and master’s levels, in order to contribute to building the next generation of successful scholars, policy-makers, and practitioners in education. We therefore seek candidates with excellent pedagogical skills, including the ability to clearly communicate sophisticated research to heterogeneous audiences. Additionally, candidates should be prepared to engage in qualitative research with graduate students, many of whom are interested in policy, programs, or practice.
Candidates should have a doctorate in a relevant field, such as education, anthropology, history, political science, psychology, policy or sociology. Successful candidates will have an excellent record of rigorous scholarship and a commitment to teaching and mentoring. Candidates completing their doctoral studies will be considered if they will complete all requirements for the doctorate by the start of the 2015-16 academic year.
The search committee will begin reviewing applications on November 1, 2014 and continue until the position is filled. 
We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.
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Faculty Position – Native American and Indigenous Studies

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Faculty Searches for 2013-2014

(Updated: April 10, 2014)

Tufts is committed to excellence in teaching and scholarship, and to building a faculty that reflects the diversity of both its students and the world for which it is preparing them. Tufts is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer, and strongly encourages members of underrepresented groups to apply.

School of Arts & Sciences

AMERICAN STUDIES: Native American and Indigenous Studies
Lecturer (Nontenure-track)

The American Studies program at Tufts University (http://as.tufts.edu/americanStudies/) seeks a qualified part-time lecturer to teach two classes in Native American and Indigenous Studies in AY 2014-2015, in the following possible areas:

1.     Introduction to Native American Studies

2.     Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights

3.     Settler Colonialism and Indigenous Histories

4.     Native American literature and culture

We are seeking a lecturer with college-level teaching experience, Ph.D. or ABD desired. Applicants should submit a letter of application and CV, and have two confidential letters of reference, one of which addresses candidate’s teaching, submitted via Interfolio at: apply.interfolio.com/24742

Review of applications begins immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Candidates from underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply.

Tufts University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. We are committed to increasing the diversity of our faculty. Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply.
(Posted: April 10, 2014)

interesting read: Blogging As Autobiography

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by Dr. Eric Anthony Grollman

Ok, so I won’t add Photoshop to my list of “mad skillz.”

I have participated in some sort of semi- or totally public form of social media since my early adolescence.  First, it was Myspace, Livejournal, and the discussion boards of a group for multiracial/multiethnic people.  I joined Facebook the year it was created.  I had taken to more formal social justice-related writing through Letters to the Editor and op-eds for my college newspaper.  By graduate school, I went totally “public,” with my first blog that was neither limited in access to my friends nor in its content.  So, now inching closer to age 30 by the day, I have been “at it” in this business, if you will, for over 15 years.  So, now, being asked by others about my decision to “self-disclose,” or being “so out there,” I hesitate before responding, “well, I guess most people don’t.”

These days, publicly writing about my personal and professional life feel like a mundane, everyday part of my life.  No matter my scholarly training, I have only one frame of reference for all things: my own.  Sure, I can readily cite what is known from research in my areas of expertise, or figure out how to find it in other areas.  But, the only solid perspective which I can readily access is my own view of the world.  What separates me from “most people,” though, seems to be  my willingness to do so publicly.

Before I get into why, I should take a moment to avoid giving myself too much credit.  There is never a time I write without intensely reflecting on whether I am in a position to even speak about a certain subject, and the consequences of deciding to speak publicly.  When I went on the academic job market, I combed my personal blog for any posts I deemed too radical or militant or even too personal.  Though I (anonymously) started Conditionally Accepted, I quickly deleted it, hoping it was a temporary job market-related need for release.  (I am so glad I decided to revive that impulse!)  And, there are posts on both this blog and my personal blog that I deleted before ever posting, or after they were posted because of (real or perceived) backlash.  Fortunately, with each time I write something personal or critical, even radical, and the sky stays intact (and I stay employed), I become braver the next time I chose to speak out.  It is far from a perfectly linear development, but I can see a return to my braver, more outspoken self that existed before graduate school.

Now, on to the why — why self-disclose, so personally, so publicly, and so often?  Well, the quick self-serving reason is the release I feel upon writing about a troubling (or even exciting) experience.  After few years of living with Generalized Anxiety Disorder, I have found getting shit bothersome stuff out of my mind and off of my chest is better than letting it eat at either or both.  And, yes, some things are shared only with the pages of journal on my nightstand.  Beyond that, sharing my own experiences is just one part of my larger project of intellectual activism.  I work to make my own scholarship — both teaching and research — accessible beyond the paywalls of college classrooms and academic journals.  Though I sometimes wrestle with feeling selfish for creating an academic blog for academics, I remind myself that this blog is, indeed, a form of intellectual activism.  It is my hope to make transparent the social problems that, too, plague academia; it turns out the ivory tower isn’t so immune to oppression, inequality, exclusion, prejudice, and exploitation after all.

In graduate school, I did not see myself reflected in course material nor in the professional socialization I underwent.  I had faculty with overlapping marginalized identities, but no one who shared my particular social location.  Though I bonded with other, similarly marginalized students, we did not always share our pain because it is tempting to hide it, or we did not want to burden others as they dealt with their own demons.  Also, as we were essentially in the same stage in our careers, we had little advice to offer to each other because we were still in the thick of it.  I did not have access to the stories of people like me — only what I assumed was true for most students and what my professors told me should be my experience and values.  Who knew I did not have to succumb to the pressure of taking a job at a Research I institution?  Who knew I could resist that pressure to actually feel happy, have a sense of balance, and not become “irrelevant” in my disciple as I was warned.

The good and the bad of creating Conditionally Accepted, now regularly telling my own story, is that I am one of few voices.  I am slowly discovering others who have been telling their stories for years now.  But, many others are looking to me to tell mine.  On top of the intense criticism one may receive in daring to “write in public,” some institutions and organizations have turned ignoring public scholarship into penalizing it.  And, in general, “it does not count.”  That all fuels a heightened sense of fear and the resultant self-silencing.  I have been commended by senior colleagues for my bravery — even requests to be cited for or speak about professional development.  (Y’all know I’m still suffering from my own impostor syndrome, right?!)

So, now a year after I secretly created this blog and then deleted it, I feel I have been assigned the task of telling my story — at least in hopes that others will be inspired to tell their own.  I am resisting the internal and external pressures to be silent, reclaiming power by pushing my story into the universe.  I hope for a day that scholars like me stop feeling alone, stop feeling that there is only one academic narrative to which they compare their own experiences and values, and stop feeling silenced and invisible.  In the mean time, stay tuned and consider contributing your own story!

Dr. Eric Anthony Grollman | April 22, 2014 at 9:00 am 

Trouble clicking? Copy and paste this URL into your browser:

http://conditionallyaccepted.com/2014/04/22/autobiography/

CAUT Census of Aboriginal Academic Staff

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Greetings,

Please find an electronic version of the CAUT census of Aboriginal Academic Staff.  (click here:  AboriginalCensusInteractiveSecureForm)

The census was developed on the basis of recommendations from CAUT’s Forum for Aboriginal Academic Staff. The census will be the sole source of information about the number of Aboriginal academic staff and graduate students in Canada as well as their positions at Canadian universities and colleges. The information collected will not be shared with third parties.

Please fill out the census form and return it to me at braun@caut.ca

Please forward widely to Aboriginal academic staff members and graduate students!

For any further questions please contact Rosa Barker at barker@caut.ca or 613-820-2270 ext. 116.

If you have already filled this out, please disregard.

__________________________________________

Lynn Braun

Canadian Association of University Teachers

2705 Queensview Drive

Ottawa, ON   K2B 8K2

Phone: 613-820-2270 ext. 184

Fax:      613-820-7244