activism

CFP – Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism; 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium Currents of Resistance, Due: Jan 13, 2017

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CALL FOR PAPERS Due: January 13, 2017

6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium

Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism

April 13-14, 2017 UC Davis

 

We are pleased to announce the 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium, to be held on the UC Davis campus on April 13-14, 2017. We welcome proposals from current graduate students and tribal college students from across the globe whose research critically addresses the issues, concerns, and lives of indigenous peoples worldwide.

 

This year’s theme, “Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism” draws inspiration and guidance from the affirmation “Mni Wiconi” or “Water is Life,” a call heard and repeated across the globe in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux actively resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline. This and previous struggles continue to connect indigenous activists and allies around the causes of Native sovereignty, environmental protection, land reclamation, and justice for indigenous peoples who have been brutalized and criminalized for fighting for the right to exist. Like rivers meeting the sea, Native and non-Native currents of resistance, activism and justice are coming together, uniting our voices as we find each other. It is in this spirit of unity that we extend our call for papers across and beyond Turtle Island. Some of the questions we hope to explore during this year’s symposium include:

 

● What are decolonial and indigenized correctives for current globalized neoliberalism?

● How can we indigenize the voices of resistance and justice against the calls of moderation and modernization?

● How do indigenous peoples work together to create sacred spaces for intellectual metamorphosis?

● How do indigenous communities and allies come together to mobilize indigenous knowledge for change?

These and many other questions call upon the wisdom and efforts of our diverse communities and relatives.

 

Graduate students from all disciplines from universities worldwide are encouraged to participate in this international dialogue. Presentations should be 12-15 minutes in length.

Possible areas of interest may include (but are not limited to):

 

Arts/Artists/Creative Expressions

Performance/Theater

Activist/ Social Movements

Indigenous Methodologies/Interpretations

Colonization/Internal Colonization/Decolonization

Queer Theory

Survivance

Women/Gender/Sexuality

Community Development/Empowerment

Racial/physical/economic/political borders

Native American Studies Pedagogy

Culture/Language Preservations

Critical Theory/Philosophy/Worldviews

Animal Studies

Tourism and Native Communities

Representations in popular culture

Histories

Social media/technologies

Immigration

Literatures

Sovereignties/Autonomies

Structural Inequalities

 

Diverse presentation formats are encouraged:

● Paper or oral presentations

● Workshops

● Roundtables or panels

● Showcasing creative work

To submit your abstract, please click here.

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Victory in the Release of Guatemalan Political Prisoner Rigoberto Juarez

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August 6, 2016

By Linda Ferrer

July 22, 2016 marked a day of victory, not only for Rigoberto Juarez Mateo, but also for the Indigenous Q’anjob’al Maya community in the municipality of Santa Eulalia, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. In a split decision made by Judges Yasmin Barrios, Patricia Bustamante, and Gerbi Sical, seven Ancestral Authorities, including Rigoberto Juarez, Domingo Baltazar, Ermitano Lopez Reyes, Sotero Adalberto Villatoro, Francisco Juan Pedro, Mynor Lopez, and Arturo Pablo were released from prison, five of whom were acquitted of all charges.

Sixteen months ago, Rigoberto Juarez, one of nine Ancestral Authorities, was detained for his advocacy against two private hydroelectric and mining companies, Hidra Energia and Hidro Santa Cruz, respectively, for their failing to comply and consult with Indigenous communities’ prior to accessing licensure for their projects. Posing a threat to their natural resources, land, and way of life, those who resisted the projects faced threats, coercion, and were sometimes kidnapped, raped, or even murdered. Rigoberto Juarez and Domingo Baltazar, two well-known Indigenous leaders, traveled to Guatemala City to file reports on these various human rights violations to the Department of Public Ministry and the United Nations Commission for Human Rights but both were arrested by police without warrant or charges. They were illegally imprisoned without due process on that day of March 23, 2015. Rigoberto Juarez was placed in High Risk Group A preventive detention center for false accusations in a series of crimes which the private companies claimed against them. Sixteen charges were then made against him, including public disturbances of peaceful demonstrations, kidnapping, and intent to commit crimes. However, the lack of evidence and factual grounds for the heinous charges that were made only indicate that the hydroelectric and mining companies, working with the Mayor and judicial system of Guatemala, strategically organized the persecution and arrest of the community leaders in order to remove their voice and actions from the resistance movement he had begun and committed to since 2008. Read more…

6 Things You Can Do to Put Your Anger into Action for #BertaCaceres

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by Cultural Survival on March 10, 2016
The international community has been reeling after the gunning down of Indigenous Lenca activist Berta Caceres of Honduras, well known and loved around the world for her dedication and commitment to her community, their lands, and protecting the environment.  Last week on March 3th, Berta was assassinated in her home by a death squad, after years of documented threats and harassment by Honduran military and private security of the hydroelectric dam company DESA.  Here are six concrete actions you can take to fight back for Berta and multiply the work she was dedicated to.
1) Ask the FMO bank to withdraw investment from the Agua Zarca project.
Berta stood up to corporations and helped delay the construction of the Agua Zarca dam which, if built, would destroy her community’s land and the Gualcarque River in Honduras. The dam was delayed due to protests for so long that investors started pulling from the project. As a result, Berta became a target for corporate spying, intimidation, and ultimately murder, simply because money wasn’t being made.   This is why we are calling on the largest remaining investor of the dam, FMO (a Dutch Development bank) to join the Chinese investors Sinohydro and the International Finance Corporation in withdrawing financial support for this project immediately.
2) Call on Authorities to Protect Gustavo Castro Soto, murder witness and assassination target.
Gustavo Castro Soto, a Mexican human rights defender, environmental activist and long-time ally of Berta and COPINH, was also shot during the attack.  Gustavo is the sole witness of the murder, and is currently being held against his will by Honduran authorities. In a note to some friends on March 6, Gustavo wrote, “The death squads know that they did not kill me, and I am certain that they want to accomplish their task.” Take action to ensure his safety by calling on Honduran, Mexican and embassy authorities demanding security for Gustavo, and to halt the criminalization against COPINH.
3) Call on the U.S. Department of State to take concrete steps
Berta was a vocal opponent of US backed 2009 presidential coup in Honduras. COPINH denounced the coup d’état as an instrument of violence serving transnational corporations to exploit resources and to repress the dissent of social movements. She also opposed continuing US military bases on Lenca territory.  The United States played has played a major role in legitimizing the 2009 coup and funding the right wing military government that has formed since.  In 2011 Washington authorized $1.3 billion for U.S. military electronics in Honduras,  and U.S. military expenditures for Honduras have gone up every year since 2009. Yet in the years since the coup, human rights violations in Honduras have increased at an alarming rate: roughly 150 environmental and human rights defenders have been killed.  Berta was a strong opponent of US military presence in Honduras. The Department of State and the US ambassador to Honduras have issued statements of condolences to Berta Caceres family and condemning her death, but stop short of describing concrete steps being taken to address the underlying issues prompting her assassination.
Write to the US state department demanding the following:
Pressure Honduran authorities to ensure the security and prompt release of Gustavo Castro.
Support COPINH’s demands that the Honduran state sign an agreement with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) to send independent experts to conduct a clean, impartial, and transparent investigation.
Ensure that no US aid goes to military units repressing the Lenca people of Rio Blanco and encourage the Honduran government to withdraw the military from the zone.

4) Ask Congress to Suspend Funding for the Alliance for Prosperity
Berta was a vocal opponent against the Alliance for Prosperity, a plan for US funding to Central America was recently approved by US congress to  provide $750 million in military financing and training million to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, as well as to facilitate investment in extractive industries, including a massive gas pipeline from Mexico to Central America. But preconditions for percent of the total funds mean that countries will have to prove they are working to reduce migration and human trafficking, combat government corruption, and decrease poverty—just some items among a considerable list. The U.S. State Department and Agency for International Development, which are jointly in charge of administrating the money, will have to report to Congress by September 30 2016 on whether sufficient progress has been made, and if not, funding can be suspended.

5) Keep the pressure on through social media.
Tweet US and Honduran officials:
@USAmbHonduras
@StateDept
@JohnKerry
@BarackObama
@MP_Honduras
@JuanOrlandoH

6)  Spread the word
Share this list with family, friends, and networks, as well as the following statements from Berta’s family and colleagues:
Statement from the daughters, son, and mother of Berta Cáceres
Urgent denunciation by COPINH

Cultural Survival
2067 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02140

Jan 22-24, 2016: STAND Conference – Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

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Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

About the Conference

In light of the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report published in June 2015 regarding the cultural genocide of First Nations peoples, STAND is looking to reorient itself toward domestic issues related to genocide in addition to our international advocacy focus. This conference will convene STAND Canada’s national leadership on the UBC campus, hosted by our UBC Chapter, for a robust dialogue on STAND’s future in relation to genocide on this land that will engage multiple stakeholders.

The objectives for this conference are open-ended as we listen through consultations, meetings, and events in an effort to understand our responsibility as a Canadian anti-genocide advocacy organization. As a result of the topic of focus, we are excited to build relationships with external allies and local Indigenous groups that may be interested in teaching us and working with us.

For more information, please view our Conference Summary.

Get Involved with the Conference

The Conference will be held from 9am – 8pm in Vancouver on January 22, 23, and from 9am – 2pm on January 24. There is no cost for attending the Conference.

We have organized two events open to the public. Please join us for the following events:

If you are interested in attending but do not have a Facebook account or you are bringing a guest, please email us or RSVP through Eventbrite to the film screening and Open Forum. We would like to ensure that our events meet room capacity numbers.

For any questions, please email us.

Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians at the Frontline of Resistance

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Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians
at the Frontline of Resistance

With Robert Lovelace
Queens University Lecturer & former Anoch Algonquin Chief

Friday, November 27 @ 1pm

Room 098, Henry Angus Building
2053 Main Mall, Unceded & Occupied Musqueam Territory

For more information: sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Stolen Land : Stolen Voices Canada and Israel are both built on land and resources stolen by European settlers; both are still sustained by the ongoing repression of indigenous peoples. The indigenous peoples of Canada and Palestine are on the front lines resisting the destruction of the land by militarism and industrial extraction. In the mainstream media and the halls of power, indigenous activists’ voices and stories have been silenced – they are treated as terrorists or historical curiosities. This event will explore the commonalities of indigenous struggles for land and freedom in Canada and in Palestine as well as connections to the global fight for a decolonized world.

Robert Lovelace is an adjunct lecturer at Queen’s University specialising in Aboriginal Studies, Re-indigenisation and De-colonisation. Robert is an anti-colonial activist and retired chief of the Anoch Algonquin First Nation. He spent 3½ months in jail as a political prisoner for defending the Ardoch homeland from uranium exploration. Robert has sailed twice on the Freedom Flotilla attempting to break the siege of Gaza. He lives at Eel Lake in traditional Ardoch territory.

UBC Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights • sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Sponsored by UBC Social Justice Centre, Seriously Free Speech Committee. Endorsed by Boycott Israeli Apartheid Campaign, Canada Palestine Association/BDS Vancouver, Canadian Boat to Gaza, Independent Jewish Voices – Vancouver, Mobilisation Against War and Occupation, North West Indigenous Council, South Asian Network for Secularism and Democracy, Streams of Justice, United Network for a Just Peace in Palestine and Israel.

B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

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B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

THE CANADIAN PRESS OCTOBER 28, 2015
A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement. The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.
BELLA BELLA – A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement.

The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.

Hereditary Chief Harvey Humchitt says the First Nation has been collaborating with industry and senior governments on planning and economic opportunities, but without much progress on resource management decisions within its territories.

Chief Marilyn Slett says existing agreements will be honoured but the new approach will build a government-to-government relationship between the Heiltsuk, B.C., and Canada.

The First Nation relies on the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 Tsilhqot’in decision, that it says found a declaration of aboriginal title could be obtained through a negotiated agreement, or by court declaration.

Heiltsuk hereditary chiefs and elected leaders say as the sovereign authority over more than 35,000 square kilometres of the central coast, the First Nation has the right to control, manage and benefit from territorial resources.

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/first+nation+writes+declaration+title+rights+strategy/11474798/story.html#ixzz3q7YrYLXd