activism

Public talk with writer/activist Arthur Manuel – Oct 21, 2015, 9-12 pm

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Wednesday October 21:
Public talk with writer/activist Arthur Manuel
Arthur Manuel, a forceful advocate for Aboriginal title and rights in Canada, co-authored the recent book Unsettling Canada: A National Wake Up Call with Grand Chief Ronald M. Derrikson. Their work not only constructs a plan for a new sustainable indigenous economy, but also lays out a decolonizing roadmap for getting there. Please join him for this free public discussion.

Wednesday, October 21, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, First Nations Longhouse

For more information, contact Natalie Clark.

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Job – CCAP administrator and community organizer, Due: July 21, 2015

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CCAP Job posting: administrator and community organizer

The Carnegie Community Action Project (CCAP) is looking for an administrator and community organizer to work with their volunteers to help low-income Downtown Eastside residents implement their Community Vision for Change and to ensure that decisions about the future of the community build on community assets. This includes working for more and better housing, higher welfare rates and to stop gentrification. This is a two day per week position through December, 2015 with the possibility of extension.

Administration

  • Manage and track budget with support from accountant
  • Manage funding and year-end funder reports
  • Coordinate CCAP employee and volunteer team
  • Raise funds

 

Maintain CCAP website and Facebook page

Publishing & speaking (In collaboration with experienced volunteers)

  • Speak and support others to speak at meetings, events, classes, city hall, news events
  • Write bulletins & newsletter articles and layout newsletter

Community meetings & actions (In collaboration with experienced volunteers)

  • Track actions of city hall, province and federal governments and coordinate response statements with other staff and volunteers
  • Support volunteers to act and speak out for their community, developing leadership capacities.
    • Organizing low-income residents to attend rezoning and development application hearings and to speak out through other venues like news conferences.
    • Attend weekly CCAP volunteer meetings

Research:  Help with producing CCAP’s annual hotel and housing report

Support:  Help low income volunteers get what they need to keep volunteering


Desired experience:

  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Ability to use computer for research, emails, formatting flyers, posters, etc.
  • Web or blog design skills
  • Good people skills
  • Grant writing and reporting
  • Facilitating workshops
  • Media/communications
  • Developing campaigns for social justice with community groups
  • Ability to work in a team and on own, and with a community board
  • Research on housing, income, and/or planning issues
  • Knowledge of city planning processes
  • Experience working in the DTES

Pay is $21 an hour gross.

Only people who are to be interviewed will be contacted. Thank you to everyone else for your interest.

The job will start when the candidate is available.

Please submit resumes by email with a half-page essay on the causes of homelessness and two references who are familiar with your work by July 21 to:

Jean Swanson
Carnegie Community Action Project
email:  jean.swanson@gmail.com

Please keep the entire application, including covering letter, in one email file.

People who are Indigenous and residents or community members of the Downtown Eastside and people who can speak Cantonese/Mandarin are encouraged to apply.

Applicants are encouraged to check out these websites before applying:

http://ccapvancouver.wordpress.com/

http://raisetherates.org/

Post End Date Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Defenders of Sacred Sites Around the Globe Featured in PBS Series

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Defenders of Sacred Sites Around the Globe Featured in PBS Series

sacred-ground-bosmun-canoe-warriors
Jennifer Huang
The Bosmun ceremonial canoe launch. The village is concerned that a new nickel mine upstream will pollute the Ramu River, their main source for food, water and bathing. Bosmun, Papua New Guinea.
5/19/15

In an opening scene of the documentary Profit and Loss, Mike Mercredi, Athabasca Chipewyan, describes how thrilling it was for his teenage self to get a job driving one of the biggest rigs in the world at a massive oil sands extraction area in Alberta, Canada.

Yet the allure slowly transformed to horror, as he began to understand the extreme effects of the oil sands industry, which uses heated water from Lake Athabasca to extract oil from the sand, on his homelands. The films shows nightmarish visuals of a landscape that has seen the oil sands industry denude the boreal forests, poison culturally vital fisheries and, many believe, infect astoundingly high numbers of local indigenous people with deadly cancers.

“I had this overwhelming anxiety. I walked into the office and put my badge down and I quit,” Mercredi says in the film.

Plumes from a distant oil sands refinery reflected in a tailings pond taken in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. This image is from Episode 2, “Profit and Loss.” (Christopher McLeod)
Plumes from a distant oil sands refinery reflected in a tailings pond taken in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. This image is from Episode 2, “Profit and Loss.” (Christopher McLeod)

Mercredi’s Fort Chipewyan band eventually hired him to create maps of sacred sites, and the film chronicles his work and those of other First Nations allies to save what they can from the oil sands development even as the Alberta government spends millions of dollars in advertising campaigns to promote the industry.

The stories of Mecredi and other sacred site guardians from eight indigenous communities across the globe will be broadcast to an audience of millions of Americans as Profit and Loss and the other three 60-minute episodes of the Standing on Sacred Ground film series air nationally on the PBS World Channel on consecutive Sundays beginning May 17 at 9 p.m. ET. The episode aired May 17 will also be aired May 20. Check StandingOnSacredGround.org for a full schedule of air times.

The indigenous subjects and producers of the films say the broadcasts are an unparalleled breakthrough for the depiction of indigenous stories on national television: An opportunity for the public to view indigenous people sharing their stories of resistance from their perspectives, learn how corporations and government often collude to circumvent indigenous rights and to gain an appreciation of how, contrary to stereotypes, indigenous knowledge and philosophy have never been more relevant in an era of climate change and mass extinctions.

“Watching the films, I was struck that even though we’re diverse culturally we all view the natural world in the same way,” Mercredi said. “If they had listened to the indigenous people from the beginning, we wouldn’t be in such a mess. Now, it’s a race against time to start ingraining our indigenous knowledge into the younger generations.”

From Papua New Guinea and Ethiopia to California and Russia, the indigenous people in the documentary series represent almost all the continents, but they face many of the same threats to their sacred sites and ancestral lands: government megaprojects, consumer culture, competing religions, resource extraction and climate change. But, producer Christopher McLeod said, the films show far more is at stake than indigenous religion.

“The sacred places are the heart where the indigenous worldview, the values and languages are anchored,” he said. “They’re a source of information and insight about adapting to climate change. It’s no coincidence the planet is dying and the sacred places are being destroyed.”

The film series is the culmination of nearly 10 years of work for McLeod and the Standing on Sacred Ground team, and he said it truly began almost 30 years ago when he was working on a film about uranium and coal mining in Hopi and Navajo territories and elders told him his work was missing an entire dimension: the sacredness of certain places and the obligation of indigenous people to care for them. Read More…

Source:  http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/05/19/defenders-sacred-sites-around-globe-featured-pbs-series-160398

Hawaii’s Mauna Kea Telescope Opposition Gains Momentum With Rallies, Walk-Out and International Support ICTMN Staff

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Telescope Opposition Gains Momentum With Rallies, Walk-Out and International Support

4/15/15

Opposition to the construction of a giant copy.4 billion telescope on top of sacred Mauna Kea Mountain gained momentum Monday, April 13 when hundreds of students and faculty members at the University of Hawaii at Manoa staged a walk-out, thousands rallied on the Big Island and Oahu to call for an end to the project, and support poured in from around the world.

“We are not going to stop until this issue is brought to a halt,” said Jon Osorio, professor in the Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, at a press conference following the walk-out, which was reported by KITV.

Native Hawaiians believe that Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano that is 13,796 feet above sea level, is the most sacred place on all of the islands. The University of Hawaii and its partners want to build the world’s biggest telescope—an 18-story high industrial complex telescope—at the top of the mountain. Scientists say it’s the best location in the world to see the faint and distant objects they can’t observe with existing telescopes. Thirteen other telescopes are currently located on Mauna Kea. Environmental groups oppose the project because of concerns about impacts to the water quality of the aquifer and the environment.

An elder on top of Mauna Kea standing with the Iroquois Warrior Society Flag, which has been flying since the beginning of the protests. (Cliff Matias)
An elder on top of Mauna Kea standing with the Iroquois Warrior Society Flag, which has been flying since the beginning of the protests. (Cliff Matias)

The university’s partners are the Thirty Meter International Observatory (TIO), Goodfellow Bros, the University of Hawai‘i (UH), the Office of Mauna Kea Management, the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, and the Hawai‘i State Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR). The University of California, California Institute of Technology, National Astronomical Observatories of China and Japan and other international institutions are also providing funding for the project, according to the International Indian Treaty Council (IITC). The council has issued a statement calling for international support to stop the desecration of Mauna Kea. …Read More.

Read more at https://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/15/telescope-opposition-gains-momentum-rallies-walk-out-and-international-support-160011

The students strike back: 75,000 protest austerity in Montreal

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The students strike back: 75,000 protest austerity in Montreal

Protesters sent a clear message on Thursday: we are mobilized, we are many, and we are not afraid

The weather report had called for “snow/rain,” but instead the clouds parted and the largest demonstration in Quebec since the student strike of 2012 was bathed in the sunny glow of springtime in Montreal.

UPDATE Apr. 6: La Presse is reporting this morning on photos showing a student trying to run from a police charge on Apr. 2, becoming trapped behind a minivan, and having his head smashed through the rear window of the minivan before he fell to the ground and was kicked and hit with a baton. No first-aid was administered by police, and this incident was not included in any action report from the day. The student was rushed to hospital where he received ten stitches: seven to his face and another three to his leg. The photos show the full sequence of events, and the student appears to have done nothing to provoke police. He has hired a lawyer and announced his intention to sue.

In Square Victoria, a park in the heart of Montreal’s financial district, each metro brought a new surge of people and the place was soon packed, with the crowd overflowing into several side streets.

Over 130,000 students were on strike across Quebec on Apr. 2, and according to the Association pour une solidarité syndicale étudiante, the crowd in Montreal reached around 75,000 at its peak. Based on my calculations, that’s a reasonable estimate. Other media outlets reported a number of 25,000, attributing it to police scanners, but that may have been prior to the demonstration’s peak.

Alongside students there was a strong labour presence, with public sector employees joining Montreal’s firefighters, labour federation Confédération des syndicats nationaux and dozens of other unions in the streets. McGill University’s law department was on strike for the first time in the history of that institution, and their banner was greeted with cheers wherever it went.

Nine student leaders are currently facing expulsion for strike-related activities at Université du Québec à Montréal, and the teachers’ union there also went on strike for the day, the faculty of that institution sending a strong message by joining their students in the streets. Read More…

Native Americans protest canonization of Junipero Serra at Carmel Mission

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Native Americans protest canonization of Junipero Serra at Carmel Mission

Native American Martin Lion attends a ceremony protesting Father Serra’s slated canonization at Carmel Mission on Sunday in Carmel. (Vernon McKnight-Herald Correspondent)

CARMEL >> On Sunday mornings, Rudy Rosales helps clean and maintain the graves of his ancestors at the Carmel Mission; either by pulling weeds or placing the abalone shells that adorn the humble mounds of earth.

It’s a ritual that connects the Ohlone Indian with his Catholic traditions and his indigenous roots. And as former tribal chairman of the Ohlone Costanoan Esselen Nation, he wasn’t exactly pleased Sunday, when more than 100 Native Americans from all over California descended onto the Mission Cemetery to hold a ceremony and protest the announced canonization of Junipero Serra, founder of the California Mission system.

“Why didn’t they boycott their own missions?” he asked. “Two thirds of our tribe is Catholic; my mom was a strict Catholic. A lot of tribal members did not ask if it was okay.”

Led by the American Indian Movement, dozens of Native Americans from different tribes from all over California gathered on the Carmel Mission Cemetery for a ceremony to honor their ancestors and their history on one of the most sacred days in the Catholic calendar.

The timing and place was chosen because Junipero Serra, the Franciscan friar who founded the first nine of the 21 missions in the California system, is buried there. Pope Francis announced in January he would bestow sainthood onto the friar when he visits the United States later in the year.

The news was met with incredulity and anger by many in the Native American community, who blame the California mission system for many of the atrocities their ancestors had to endure. They began organizing the ceremony/protest soon after the announcement. Read More…

Hopi Nation and HARP File Lawsuit in France to Stop Future Sales of Sacred Objects

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Hopi Tribe and HARP File Lawsuit in France to Stop Future Sales of Sacred Objects

Herman Honanie

WASHINGTON — The Hopi Tribal Council and the Holocaust Art Restitution Project (HARP) filed a lawsuit in France to appeal a recent decision by the French “Conseil des Ventes” (“Board of Auction Sales”), an administrative body in charge of regulating and supervising auction sales on the French market.

The announcement of the lawsuit filing was made jointly by Herman G. Honanie, chairman of the Hopi Tribe and Ori Z. Soltes, of HARP.

Although the Conseil has the administrative power to suspend sales, it refused to suspend a December 15, 2014 auction sale of sacred “kwaa tsi” owned by the Hopi tribe, the Conseil allowed the sale to proceed after a special hearing held in Paris on December 11, 2014, rejecting the arguments put forth by the Hopi Tribe and HARP that title had never vested with subsequent possessors due to the sacred nature of these objects. Read More…

http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/hopi-tribe-and-harp-file-lawsuit-in-france-to-stop-future-sales-of-sacred-objects/