artists

Two-Spirit Events at Talking Stick Festival, Feb. 16 – 23rd

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2Spirit Rebellion
Join us for a night of rebellion as the Brush Arbor Gurlz demonstrate the resilience of two-spirit people.
February 17th, 20179:00 PM

Odyssey Bar & Nightclub
686 W Hastings St, Vancouver, BC V6B 1P1Price: $15Purchase tickets HERE.Harsh words too often erode the confidence of two-spirit people but for some, drag is used to denote their strength.

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Two-Spirit Intersection(s) and Connection(s)

Exploring the space between and within Two-Spirit: performance, politics and community organizing.  

Tuesday February 21

1PM – 4PM

Roundhouse Arts and Recreation Centre – Exhibition Hall

181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

Join us for an afternoon of Two-Spirit conversations exploring the history of the Two-Spirit tradition(s) followed by a panel discussion of distinguished Two-Spirit performers exploring the intersection of Two-Spirit identify, performance, politics and community organizing.

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War Paint: Drag Queens Prepare For Battle

The Brush Arbor Gurlz (BAGz) invite you to join them for a drag workshop. 

February 21, 2017
7:00 PM

Roundhouse Performance Centre
181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2W3

The BAGz see drag as a way to transcend gender and express themselves politically through their performance art.  They will demonstrate their transformation process with makeup, lashes and wigs while discussing Native issues, Two-Spirit identity, performance pieces, inspirations and empowerment by their alter egos.

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AMP it UP – Aboriginal and Two-Spirit Media Training

Join us for AMP it UP, a practical, hands-on, media training/workshop to develop, strengthen and support work with media outlets. 

Saturday  February 25

10am – 1PM

Holiday Inn & Suite Downtown Vancouver

1110 Howe St, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1R2

Wouldn’t it be great if we had a personal publicist or a PR firm to manage and support our communication and media needs? Media outlets—newspapers, magazines, radio stations, television and Internet-based media/sites are important ways to inform a broad range of people about information, messages, issues, activities and events. Media is also an important tool in moving and shaping public opinion, discussions and conversations when done correctly.

 

An Afternoon of Dance: Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum. Due: 12:30 – 2:30pm, Jan 9, 2017

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An Afternoon of Dance with

Hoop dancer Dallas Arcand & Métis dancer Madelaine McCallum

January 9th 2017

12:30 – 2:30pm

Sty-Wet-Tan Hall, UBC Longhouse, 1985 West Mall

Following the performances, open conversation with Dallas Arcand, Madelaine McCallum and Filmmaker, Darcy Muenchrath.
Everyone is welcome.Afternoon_of_Dance_poster.jpg

Funding – Youth or Mid-Career Artist Scholarships, YVR Art Foundation. Due: Jan 27, 2017

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The YVR Art Foundation – Call for Art Scholarship Applications
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The YVR ART FOUNDATION is pleased to announce a Call for Applications from BC and Yukon First Nations artists interested in applying for Youth or Mid-Career Artist Scholarships.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
2017 ART SCHOLARSHIPS

The YVR Art Foundation is now accepting applications for the
2017 Youth Scholarship and Mid-Career Artist Scholarship awards for
BC and Yukon First Nations artists.

Each award is valued at $5,000. Up to seven YVR Art Foundation Youth Scholarships and up to two Mid-Career Artist Scholarships will be awarded. Youth Scholarship recipients will be brought to Vancouver for an awards ceremony and their art work will be exhibited at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) for one year.

The deadline for applications is Friday, January 27, 2017.

Eligibility and criteria for the two scholarships include:

YVR Art Foundation Youth Scholarship
Eligible Applicants:
Are of BC or Yukon First Nations ancestry
Reside in BC or Yukon
Be between the ages of 16 and 26
Are emerging artists who create visual art that reflects BC or Yukon First Nations’ culture
Have the goal of becoming a professional artist
Are accepted to study with a mentor or at a formal institution of learning
Commit to attend the Scholarship Award ceremony in Vancouver on May 26, 2017 and the ceremony in recognition of the completed work, one year later, on May 25, 2018
YVR Art Foundation Mid-Career Scholarship
Eligible Applicants:
Are of BC or Yukon First Nations ancestry
Reside in BC or Yukon
Be age 27 or older
Create visual art that reflects BC or Yukon First Nations’ culture
Wish to further their art careers and/or extend their work into a new scale or medium
Have completed basic art training
Have achieved local and/or provincial recognition through public presentation of their artwork
Are accepted to study/work with an master artist; at a formal institution of learning; or on a special project that is of cultural significance to the artist’s community
Are able to submit a portfolio of artwork that demonstrates the artist’s commitment to their practice

For more information on the YVR Art Foundation and to apply for the scholarships go to the Foundation website: http://www.yvraf.com/programs.

Please forward this email to those who may be interested in applying for a scholarship. If you have any questions, please contact the YVR Art Foundation at cynthia@yvraf.com or ph. 604.276.6261.

Museum of Anthropology: December 2016

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Coming Soon: Gallery of Northwest Coast Masterworks
In case you missed our big news last month, MOA will soon be home to a significant collection of historical and contemporary Indigenous artworks and a new Gallery of Northwest Coast Masterworks. The anonymous donation of more than 200 pieces of Indigenous art, worth an estimated $7 million, is believed to be the largest collection of Northwest Coast First Nations art to return to B.C. in recent decades.

Work on the new gallery has already begun, and it is scheduled to open in June. We’re incredibly excited by this development, and we invite you to learn more about it on our website. You can see a few of the donated objects above, or take a moment to view our Masterworks photo gallery on Flickr. 

Make Your Own Ceramic Art with MOA’s Artist in Residence
Javier Ramirez, a highly acclaimed ceramic artist from Mexico, is in residence at MOA until December 15. Drop by and visit him as he creates a Tree of Life sculpture for our collection. Or better yet, you can join Javier this Saturday for a rare chance to sculpt your own ceramic creations and have them fired in a dugout, wood-burning kiln on MOA’s grounds. Learn more and get tickets.
Unique Gifts Galore at our Winter Art Market
If you’re searching for thoughtful gifts for friends and family, you’ll find plenty of ideas at our annual Winter Art Market. Our wonderful staff at the MOA Shop have gathered up their favourite seasonal items and stocked up on your favourite gifts, such as this stunning shirt by Nuxalk artist Danika Naccarella, the winner of our t-shirt contest this year. The Winter Art Market runs at the MOA Shop until December 24. 
Holiday Hours
Gather your family up and bring them to MOA this holiday season for a tour, or simply take in one of our temporary exhibitions. We’re open our regular hours, with a few exceptions:
  • December 24: 10 am – 2:30 pm
  • December 25: Closed
  • December 31: 10 am – 2:30 pm
Calendar of Events

 

Recruiting workshop and cast members for šxʷʔamət (home)

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workshop and cast members for šxʷʔamət (home) – no acting experience required
Theatre for Living is collaborating with Journey’s Around the Circle Society on our next Mainstage production in 2017, šxʷʔamət (home).  After all the proclamations, apologies, and policies from the government to address Reconciliation with indigenous people in Canada…what does Reconciliation look and feel like on the ground?  Is it just another form of assimilation? How do we ensure it is honourable?
The project will be created and performed by Indigenous and non-indigenous people living the issues, and will be directed by David Diamond, and Associate Director Renae Morriseau.  All participants and cast are paid a living wage – no acting experience is required.  The only requirement is lived experiences in the journey towards Reconciliation.
Are you interested in contributing to the process by sharing your own journey towards Reconciliation? 
Apply now to be a part of šxʷʔamət (home)!
Workshop dates: Jan 30th – Feb 4th, 2017
Rehearsals: Feb 7th – 26th, 2017
Play: 11 performances, March 3 – 11th, 2017 (with a preview on March 2nd) at the Firehall Arts Centre.
To apply, email David Ng (outreach@theatreforliving.com) , Theatre for Living’s Outreach Coordinator your application, contact information, and answers to to the two questions below:
We want real diversity in the room, so tell us who you are, and anything else you want us to know about you!
What is your journey towards reconciliation? What are the blockages that you think exist? Share with us your story, your lived experiences with Reconciliation, and what it means to you?
There is no right or wrong answer to these questions – we are looking for your own personal lived experiences and expertise.
Please share this email with any one you think might be interested in participating in šxʷʔamət (home).
For more information, please visit the link below:
or email our Outreach Coordinator, David Ng, at outreach@theatreforliving.com
or phone the office 604.871.0508
Please keep in mind that the work is physical work – meaning it uses the physical language of the theatre to engage with the issues we are investigating.  It does not involve verbal storytelling/testimonials, or flipcharts J

 

 

David Ng
Outreach Coordinator
Theatre for Living (Headlines Theatre)

323 – 350 East 2nd Avenue (buzzer 2509)   |   Unceded Coast Salish Territories  |  Vancouver, BC Canada V5T 4R8
ph: 604.871.0508   |   toll free in Canada/US: 1.877.761.0508  |  
Find us on FACEBOOK  |  Twitter: @theatre4living  | Instagram: @theatre4living

 

Call for Papers, Provoking Curriculm – “Curriculum Encounters”, Due: September 6, 2016

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Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers

“Curriculum Encounters”

February 17-19, 2017

Eighth Biennial Provoking Curriculum Conference

Faculty of Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Co-sponsored by CACS (Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies)

 

Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers 2017 (PDF)

We welcome submissions to the upcoming Provoking Curriculum conference. While we invite any and all pieces that address your current work in curriculum studies, we especially invite submissions that speak to “Curriculum Encounters.”  We welcome proposals for: papers and panels; poetry, arts-informed, and performative pieces.

“Curriculum Encounters” attends to how curriculum, never politically neutral nor materially inert nor disembodied, is always ‘in the making.’ We understand ‘making curriculum’ as very different from the notion of curriculum as a “management category” preoccupied with making a “language of input and output within a production system” (Aoki, 2005, p. 271). Instead, we know that ‘making curriculum’ (as well as unmaking it) carries ethical charges, opening ourselves to encounters (past, present, future; expected and unexpected): (1) with a plurality of voices, beings and bodies, which are all in movement, (2) in spaces that may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary or transitional/in between), and that through our encounters (3) affective intensities may be produced, which can 4) inspire new ethical charges.

Therefore, the proposed theme includes the following (4) thematic strands: Plurality, Spaces, Intensities, and Charges.

 

(1) Plurality

Whose voices, beings or bodies need to be considered in our curriculum encounters? As Maxine Greene (and Hannah Arendt) remind us, plurality is “the condition of human action because we are all the same, that is, human, in such a way that nobody is ever the same as anyone else who ever lived, lives, or will live” (Greene, 1995, pp. 155-6).

(2) Spaces

What kinds of curricular spaces (e.g., disciplinary, interdisciplinary, transitional/in between, “places d’accueil”) can be created to be open to a plurality of voices, beings and/or bodies? In what kinds of spaces are curriculum boundaries made and unmade? By whom, where and why? How can such reconfigurations contribute to projects of curricular reconstruction (Pinar, 2011)?

(3) Intensities

Which curricular intensities will conduce to attuning and opening us to plurality and differences? What kinds will produce discomfort and provoke thinking? How can we become better attuned to the “affective discharges of the semiotic” (Lewkowich, 2015, p. 46) including instances “where the body takes over from … words” (Phillips in Lewkowich, 2015)?

(4) Charges

What kinds of curricular charges (e.g., responsibilities, commitments, projects, movements), might emerge from these intensities so as to catalyze consciousness and move us towards more “just and caring” classrooms and curricula (Greene, 1995, p. 167), ones that address such important contemporary issues as sustainability and wellbeing, and that can continually bring us back to the question: “What is the significance of inviting people to take up what really matters to them?” (Chambers, 1998, p. 17).

 

When submitting a proposal, include the following:

 

  • Name & e-mail address for each participant involved in the proposal
  • Institutional affiliation
  • Title of the presentation
  • 250-word abstract with a clear explanation of the presentation format

 

Please submit your proposals by September 6, 2016 to provokingcurriculummcgill@gmail.com.

 

The conference will open Friday evening with a plenary, with sessions running Saturday and Sunday, and concluding Sunday at 3:30 pm. We are anticipating publishing from the conference (e.g., journal issue; edited book): more news at the conference itself!

 

Thank you and we look forward to your submissions!

 

Provoking Curriculum Organizing Committee

Teresa Strong-Wilson (McGill) & Avril Aitken (Bishops), co-presidents of CACS, with Mindy Carter, Margaret Dobson, Christian Ehret, Lisa Starr, Paul Zanazanian (McGill), Sandra Chang-Kredl (Concordia) & McGill doctoral students Mitchell McLarnon, Shauna Rak, Abigail Shabtay, Layal Shuman, & Amarou Yoder; thank you to Shauna for permission to include the ‘provocative’ image included in this Call.

 

http://www.csse-scee.ca/cacs/news_item/provoking_curriculum_studies_2017

 

References

 

Aoki, T. (2005). In the midst of slippery theme-worlds: Living as designers of Japanese Canadian curriculum (1992). In W. Pinar and R. L. Irwin (Eds.), Curriculum in a new key: The collected works of Ted T. Aoki (pp. 263-77). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

Chambers, C. (1998). On taking my own (love) medicine: Memory work in writing and pedagogy. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 14 (4), 14-20.

 

Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts and social change.

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Lewkowich, D. (2015). Reminders of the abject in teaching: Psychoanalytic notes on my

sweaty, pedagogical self. Emotion, Space and Society, 16, 41-47.

 

Pinar, W. (2011). The character of curriculum studies: Bildung, currere, and the recurring question of the subject. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Behind Alex Cuba’s Canada Day performance in Wit’suwet’in

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‘I’m digging into the roots of my adopted land,’ says Cuban-Canadian songwriter

By Andrew Kurjata, CBC News Posted: Jul 01, 2016 7:00 AM PT Last Updated: Jul 01, 2016 7:00 AM PT

Cuban-Canadian singer Alex Cuba had the lyrics of one of his songs translated into the Wit'suwet'in language for a Canada Day performance on Parliament Hill.

Cuban-Canadian singer Alex Cuba had the lyrics of one of his songs translated into the Wit’suwet’in language for a Canada Day performance on Parliament Hill. (Alex Cuba photo: Paul Darrow/Reuters; Lyrics photo: Alex Cuba/Facebook)

When Cuban-born singer Alex Cuba takes the national stage for a performance on Parliament Hill this Canada Day, he’ll be showcasing the language of his adopted home — and it isn’t English or French.

Instead, the Juno and Grammy-award winning artist will be performing a verse from his song Directo in Wit’suwet’in, an Athabaskan language spoken by First Nations in northwest British Columbia.

Cuba says the performance is his way of paying tribute to his adopted home, the small town of Smithers in northern B.C.

“I have roots in that part of Canada now,” he said. “I made Smithers my home for over 13 years now, and my kids, they are growing in Smithers.”

“I’m basically digging into the roots of my adopted land.”

From Spanish to English to Wit’suwet’in

Ron Austin

Northwest coast artist Ron Austin (T’sek’ot) translated lyrics from English to Wit’suwet’in. (Northwest Community College)

The lyrics were translated by Ron Austin (T’sek’ot), an artist and hereditary chief living in nearby Moricetown.

First, Cuba had to translate the words from Spanish to English. Then, Austin got to work adapting them to Wit’suwet’in.

“I had to search for some words like ‘hopelessness,’ because in our language it’s said almost like a sentence,” the chief said. The closest he could come was the phrase, “My heart is in confusion.”

“It’s a more expressive language.”

Endangered language takes national stage

It was during this collaboration that Cuba discovered the deeper significance of the project.

Alex Cuba Director lyrics in Wit'suwet'in

The lyrics of Alex Cuba’s song ‘Directo’ translated into Wit’suwet’in, along with handwritten notes. (Alex Cuba/Facebook)

There are only a few fluent Wit’suwet’in speakers left: somewhere between 70 and 200.

Austin says when he was growing up, children spoke nothing but Wit’suwet’in. That changed when he was sent to a Catholic day school.

“We were not allowed to practice our language and not allowed to speak any native language without being disciplined. Now you see our children around the village, all they do is speak English.”

Cuba says hearing this reaffirmed his commitment to learning the verse.

“It became more clear to me, what if I can do this on national television? … I am honoured to be able to do my little bit to help save this language.”

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