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artists

Intertextual Reading Group with Glen Coulthard. 1-2pm, March 8, 2016

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You are invited to join Dr. Glen Coulthard, who will read from his critically acclaimed book, Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition (University of Minnesota Press, 2014). Intertextual: Art in Dialogue is an ongoing reading group held across a range of visual art institutions in Vancouver that takes place between January and October 2016.

Dr. Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and part of the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at UBC. He has written and published numerous articles and chapters in the areas of Indigenous thought and politics, contemporary political theory and radical social and political thought.

Tuesday, March 8, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, UBC

Hoop Dancing & Smoke Dancing workshops

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The CFNDF Youth Outreach program provides a unique opportunity for youth (ages 14-24) to receive mentorship under leading Indigenous dance artists. The program’s goal is to encourage youth to engage with the practices of song and dance and to instill within them the confidence to know that their voice is valued. Bridging traditional and contemporary forms, the artists leading the workshops are all innovators of their art forms. The classes are open to all youth with no previous experience necessary.

Hoop Dancing: James Jones facilitates a movement based workshop centered on the practice of hoop dancing. He teaches participants the fundamentals and basic steps of hoop dancing and speak about its history and significance and his connection to contemporary practice.

Tuesday, March 1, 2:30 – 3:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

Smoke Dancing: Tesha Emarthle leads a movement based workshop grounded in her background as a smoke dancer. She teaches the basic steps of smoke dancing and share its history and cultural significance for Haudenosaunee people.

Wednesday, March 2, 2:30 – 3:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

Pre-registration is required for these free workshops.

 

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 15, 2016

Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

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Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

Veronica Puskas wins an award for excellence at Quilt Canada’s national juried show

CBC News Posted: Jun 26, 2014 5:57 AM CTLast Updated: Jun 26, 2014 12:43 PM CT

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont. (Courtesy Veronica Puskas)

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

A former resident of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories has been recognized at a national quilt show.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas quilt

Veronica Puskas’ quilt, called ‘Pillars of Strength,’ is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

Her quilt, called Pillars of Strength, is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950.

Puskas says the quilt honours her grandmother, but making it also helped her.

“I hope to encourage people that are going through difficult times that through doing some artwork or doing something to make something beautiful is very cathartic,” she says. “It helps you deal with the emotions and the hurt while doing it.”

Puskas says she started working on the project many years ago and then set it aside. In the end, it was truly a labour of love.

Veronica Puskas quilt (detail)

Detail from Pillars of Strength. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

“Mom used to tell us you can do better than that and that’s all I kept hearing.”

Puskas’ quilt was selected out of about 80 entries in her category.

Marilyn Michelin, chair of the event, says Puskas’ skill is remarkable.

“To do people in a picture is just unbelievable,” she says. “The talent that people have for that.”

Puskas now lives in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

She says she’ll keep using Nunavut and the North as inspiration for future projects.

Nuliavuk

Nuliavuk by Veronica Puskas was recently displayed at a local exhibit in Ontario. (Yellowknife Quilters’ Guild)

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/inuk-woman-from-the-kivalliq-wins-national-quilting-award-1.2688197?cmp=abfb

Peabody Essex Museum receives grant to support Native American Fellowship

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Setting up for “Native Fashion Now” at the Peabody Essex Museum.

DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF

Setting up for “Native Fashion Now” at the Peabody Essex Museum.

The Peabody Essex Museum has received a $750,000 grant to expand a fellowship program intended to train aspiring Native American museum professionals. The three-year grant, awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will enable the museum to increase the number of fellows it admits annually, extend the program to 12 weeks, and introduce more formal mentoring programs.

“We’re absolutely delighted to be partnering with the Mellon Foundation,” said PEM director Dan Monroe. “It offers an opportunity for more young Native American leaders to significantly strengthen their capabilities to be successful in many cultural arenas — be it in their communities or in the context of their existing institutions, whether it’s an art museum like PEM or another organization.”

First created by the museum six years ago, the Native American Fellowship program is believed to be the only one of its kind in the country. Reserved for students of Native American or native Hawaiian descent, the program provides specific fellowships in curatorial, educational, media, and manuscript processing. Read More…

Upcoming Indigenous Events at the Museum of Anthropology

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The Sepik River of Papua New Guinea is one of the largest river systems in the world, extraordinarily beautiful, but seldom visited. This exhibition will not only showcase the finest contemporary collection of these works in Canada – it will also raise awareness of environmental risks from proposed logging and mining operations that threaten the cultural and natural environs of the region.

Save the Date: Join us for the opening party on March 1, 2016.

 

 

  • Coastal First Nations Dance Festival

The 2016 Coastal First Nations Dance Festival returns to MOA in March with special performances and school programs. The festival will showcase the diverse and rich cultural traditions practiced by a selection of some of the best artists from coastal British Columbia, the Yukon, as well as national and international guest artists. The museum’s Great Hall will be transformed into a celebration of Indigenous cultures and dance traditions.

The 2016 Coastal First Nations Dance Festival is produced by the Dancers of Damelahamid in partnership with the Museum of Anthropology.

 

Vancouver artist Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, of Coast Salish and Okanagan descent, is the focus in this provocative exhibition of new and existing paintings, drawings, sculptures, and installation works that confront the colonialist suppression of First Nations people, and the ongoing struggle for Aboriginal rights to lands, resources, and sovereignty.

Save the Date: Join us for the opening party on May 10, 2016.

 
  • Holiday Tours:
    December 19 – January 3
    11:00am- MOA Tour (55 min)
    1:00pm- Potlatch Collection Highlights (25 min)
    2:00pm- MOA Tour (55 min)

    Holiday tours end January 3rd. Check our website for the regular and holiday tour schedules.

  • Regular Tours starting January 4:
    Wednesday – Sunday:
    11:30am- MOA tour (55 min)
    2:00pm- MOA tour (55 min)

    Tuesday:
    11:30am- MOA tour (55 min)
    2:00- MOA tour (55 min)
    6:00pm- MOA Tour (55 min)

    All tours are free with museum admission.

  • Holiday Hours:
    Open December 31, 10am – 3pm
    Open January 1, 10am – 5pm
    *Please note that the café will be closed January 1.

 

 

 

Artist Conversations at MOA, UBC. Nov. 22, 1 pm–2:30 pm

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Artist Conversations at MOA

MOA invites you to participate in a conversation between artists. In conjunction with the new exhibit (In)visible: The Spiritual World of Taiwan Through Contemporary Art, Walis Labai, Yuma Taru and Anli Genu will engage in conversation with Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, an artist from Haida Gwaii, and MOA Curator Fuyubi Nakamura. Join them for a discussion concerning issues of identity, indigeneity, and cultural heritage in contemporary art. This event is free with with your free student card admission.Sunday, November 22, 1:00 – 2:30 PM
Museum of Anthropology, UBCFor more information, contact MOA Reception or call 604-827-5932.

 

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, November 16, 2015

Tillikum Lens Photo Exhibition Opening

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Tillikum Lens Photo Exhibition Opening

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Take a walk in my shoes and see the world that I see.

Join us for a photo gallery opening hosted by Tillikum Lens, a program dedicated to empower indigenous youth through image making. Photos that will be displayed were all taken by youth, with the help of experienced instructors who work with local communities and organizations to promote diverse perspectives and cross-cultural understanding.

To learn more about Tillikum Lens, please read the outline.

People are drawn to different mediums for creative purposes. What we saw within our youth that took part in Tillikum Lens is they not only learned to be creative but began to witness the world around them and document it. For a young person who may not feel they have a place, or purpose in this world this is a massive realization, they became aware and, they belong to that moment. That moment they record has a story and now they are a part of it.” – Osoyoos Indian Band

Join us for an evening of creativity, stories and music celebrating indigenous youth.

Open to all ages. Light refreshments will be served.

Register for the event here.

Explore some of the photography: http://tillikumlens.com/

Co-sponsored by Sony Canada, the International Sustainability Education Foundation, the Osoyoos Indian Band and Lil’wat Nation, and the Squamish Nation, and the Liu Institute for Global Issues, UBC.

Location:
Liu Lobby Gallery
Address:
6476 North West Marine Drive

Justin Trudeau signals new approach to relationship with Indigenous people

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Justin Trudeau signals new approach to relationship with Indigenous people

Ceremony included recognition of traditional Algonquin territory and performances from Indigenous children

By Connie Walker, CBC News Posted: Nov 04, 2015 4:34 PM ETLast Updated: Nov 04, 2015 5:51 PM ET

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The first sign that this government is taking a new approach to its relationship with indigenous people came when Theland Kicknosway, a 12-year-old Cree drummer, led the way into Rideau Hall today for the swearing-in of Justin Trudeau and his cabinet.

There has been indigenous participation in the past, but today’s ceremony was clearly meant to symbolize a new relationship with indigenous people and the government of Canada.

The Cree boy’s song ended and was quickly followed with an acknowledgement the gathering was on traditional Algonquin territory.

The ceremony also featured giggling Inuit throat singers who stole the show and wrapped up with three Métis jiggers.

Two indigenous ministers were sworn into Trudeau’s cabinet: Jody Wilson-Raybould (Kwakwaka’wakw) was named minister of justice; and Hunter Tootoo (Inuit) is the new minister of fisheries and the Canadian Coast Guard.

Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett Nov 4 2015

Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett is sworn-in during the ceremony at Rideau Hall. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

But perhaps the most symbolic change was the renaming of Aboriginal and Northern Affairs to Indigenous and Northern Affairs.

The new minister is longtime aboriginal affairs critic Carolyn Bennett, who held an eagle feather and a braid of sweetgrass as she was sworn in.

Hayden King, professor of Indigenous governance at Ryerson University, says the name change will be welcome in the indigenous community.

cree drummer cabinet

Cree drummer Theland Kicknosway, 12, leads the procession into Rideau Hall before Justin Trudeau is sworn in as Canada’s 23rd prime minister. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

“Obviously Trudeau wants to be sensitive to indigenous people and the name change reflects a change in approach — it’s adopting our language. In that sense it’s hard to critique the change.”

King said the term indigenous has become preferred over aboriginal.

“I think indigenous is a term that actual native people, indigenous peoples, originated themselves. It comes from us as a people, so I think that’s one reason that people prefer it.”

“Aboriginal is kind of a status, legal, domestication of indigenous concerns, whereas indigenous or indigeneity is kind of sovereigntist, more authentic term used by indigenous people themselves.”

A video of Theland’s drumming posted on Facebook  quickly gained thousands of views and shares.


And many of the comments contain the word hope.

But King is not convinced the symbolism will result in the “real change” that Trudeau has promised indigenous Canadians.

“Everybody wants to be hopeful. I want to be hopeful, I want to be optimistic, but I am a student of history and my reservoir of cynicism is deep. There do seem to be some positive signs, but at the same time, we know what is going to happen.”

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Inuit throat singers at swearing-in ceremony 0:54

CBC News Aboriginal: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/justin-trudeau-signals-new-approach-to-relationship-with-indigenous-people-1.3304234?cmp=abfb

New Publication – Growing Our Own: Indigenous Research, Scholars, and Education

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Growing Our Own: Indigenous Research, Scholars, and Education

The Alaska Native Studies Council (ANSC) held its first conference in the spring of 2013 in Anchorage, Alaska. The original plan called for a biennial conference, which would alternate between the various University of Alaska campus locations. Due to the success of the first conference at the University of Alaska Anchorage, it has become an annual event, and the University of Alaska Southeast hosted the 2014 conference. The theme of the second ANSC Conference was “Growing our Own: Indigenous Researchers, Scholars, and Education.” This theme was selected by the Conference Organizing Committee and was based on our mission and the interest of participants. The pre-conference symposia showcased Alaska Native artists sharing their works at the University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau campus. The theme “Growing Our Own” was inspired by the work of leaders in the Indigenous education movement.

Recent Submissions

Award-winning storyteller and performer Sharon Shorty named VPL’s 2015 aboriginal storyteller in residence

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Award-winning storyteller and performer Sharon Shorty named VPL’s 2015 aboriginal storyteller in residence

NEWS RELEASE
August 12, 2015

Photo: Mark Rutledge

VANCOUVER, B.C. – Vancouver Public Library is pleased to announce Sharon Shorty – speaker of the Teslin Tlingit Council and an award-winning playwright and actor – as its 2015 aboriginal storyteller in residence.

A member of the Tlingit (Raven Clan), Northern Tutchone and Norwegian People, Shorty has deep roots in the storytelling tradition of the southern Yukon. For more than 25 years, she has fused this tradition with her acclaimed performance on stages around the world.

Shorty’s creative approach is a blend of contemporary genres and traditional storytelling passed down from her grandmothers. She has been recognized with the Aurora Award for storytelling and for her play Trickster in the Old Folks Home, and she received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for significant public service to the Yukon and Canada.

“I am fortunate to have the mentorship of my grandmothers and be part of an unbroken series of oral traditions,” says Shorty. “Having lived in the Yukon and Vancouver for a number of years, I have strong ties to the Lower Mainland and am looking forward to being VPL’s aboriginal storyteller in residence.

“This will be a great opportunity to share the traditions of my people and focus on the use of stories in everyday life,” she continues. “Whether it’s sharing family history, finding stories rooted in identity, or inspiring younger generations to engage with their story, I aim to grow that connection.”

VPL’s award-winning aboriginal storyteller program was created in 2008 and was one of the first at a Canadian public library.

“We are delighted to be able to bring Sharon’s passion for storytelling to Vancouverites,” says VPL chief librarian Sandra Singh. “Our aboriginal storyteller program is just one of the ways libraries showcase the power of stories – to cross cultures, to bridge generations and connect us with ideas and with each other.

“Libraries provide access to a world of information across formats and through diverse channels,” she says. “Coming together to experience stories – such as Sharon’s – provide opportunities that are just as important to learning as reading books or watching films.”

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Shorty’s inaugural event as VPL’s 2015 aboriginal storyteller in residence is Tuesday, Aug. 25 (7 p.m.) at the central library’s Alice MacKay room.

This public event will feature a special welcome to the territory and traditional stories from the North. Admission is free.

Additional events at VPL branches across the city will run throughout the fall season. Look for details at VPL branches or at vpl.ca/events.

High-resolution images and media interviews are available upon request.

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About Vancouver Public Library

Vancouver Public Library has been dedicated to meeting the lifelong learning, reading and information needs of Vancouver residents for more than 100 years. Our vision is an informed, engaged, and connected city. Our mission is a free place for everyone to discover, create and share ideas and information. Last year, VPL had more than 6.8 million visits with patrons borrowing more than 9 million items, including books, ebooks, CDs, DVDs and magazines. Across 21 locations and online, VPL is the most-visited major urban library per capita in Canada.