BC First Nations

Call for Submissions: Gatherings-Water project. Deadline EXTENDED TO MARCH 15, 2016

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Theytus Books is please to announce the Gatherings-Water project and a call for writing submissions from B.C. based Indigenous Youth on the theme of water. The Gatherings-Water anthology will be published in November 2015 and those writings chosen by an editorial committee will be featured in the book as well as receiving an honorarium and complementary copy.

This special book marks the return of the Gatherings anthologies that were a mainstay of Theytus Books’ publishing program for a decade. In addition to the anthology, there will be community engagement writing workshops in four B.C. Indigenous communities (locations and dates to be announced) blogs on the Gatherings-Water website and news and links to issues vital to the importance and future of Water in the B.C. region.

The Gatherings-Water project reflects the cultural rejuvenation of Indigenous Youth in B.C. It is not only a revival of a respected anthology series, but also a new level of engagement between publishing house and community, between established writers and emerging voices, and finally a testament to the connection of Indigenous Youth with the life-sustaining power of water.

This call for submissions is open to Indigenous Youth in the province of B.C., 30 years of age and younger.

Submissions can be prose, poetry, nonfiction or based on legends or teachings. Submissions should not exceed 3,000 words.Email your submission as a .jpg, .pdf, or .docx with a short biography of yourself to publisher@theytus.com. Please include 2-3 lines about your submitted work and what water means to you.

Submissions deadline EXTENDED TO MARCH 15, 2016

For more Information:

Publisher: Dr. Gregory Younging 250-493-7181 Ext. 2249 publisher@theytus.com

Theytus Books Ltd. gratefully acknowledges the support of the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation in making ‘Gatherings ~ Water’ possible.

Melanie Mark, NDP MLA, Is 1st First Nations Woman Elected To B.C. Legislature

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Posted: 02/03/2016 8:55 am EST Updated: 02/03/2016 9:59 am EST
MELANIE MARK

Melanie Mark grew up in one of Canada’s poorest neighbourhoods, bouncing around the social housing system while her mother struggled with addiction and her siblings lived in foster care.

Decades later, she’s about to become the first indigenous woman to be elected to B.C.’s legislature in the province’s history.

Mark, a New Democrat, snagged a seat in her party’s stronghold of Vancouver-Mount Pleasant in a byelection Monday. She handily defeated Liberal Gavin Dew and Green candidate Pete Fry with over 60 per cent of the vote.

The mother of two will be replacing Jenny Kwan, who moved into federal politics as NDP MP for Vancouver-East last October.

melanie mark
Mark at a campaign launch event in April 2015. (Photo: Facebook)

Mark was a frontrunner throughout the campaign, which was an experience that provided a stark contrast from a childhood marked with hardship.

Now 40, the politician grew up in social housing in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside — an impoverished neighbourhood known for high levels of homelessness, addiction, and mental illness.

Mark’s mother — now 10 years sober — was an alcoholic. Her father was also an addict and died from an overdose when she was in her 20s, the MLA wrote in a letter published by the Georgia Straight last week.

Mark, who is of Cree, Nisga’a, Gitxsan, and Ojibway descent, also had several siblings living in foster care. The future politician said she was left to support them for 16 years, working with “relentless passion” while her mother struggled with addiction.

melanie mark
Mark at a campaign event before winning the byelection in her riding of Vancouver-Mount Pleasant on Feb. 2, 2016. (Photo: Melanie Mark’s Campaign/Flickr)

Mark was shuffled into “over 30” different homes growing up in the neighbourhood, she told the Straight.

But her takeaway from it all, according to her website, wasn’t frailty.

It was “warrior strength.”

Youth advocacy and provincial politics

Mark, who studied political science at B.C.’s Simon Fraser University, spent years advocating for children and youth in the province and across Canada. She worked with organizations such as Covenant House Vancouver, Save the Children, the RCMP, and co-founded Vancouver’s Aboriginal Policing Community Centre.

She also volunteered as president of the city’s Urban Native Youth Association, which helps indigenous youth settle into city life.

Before her foray into politics, Mark worked with B.C. children’s watchdog Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond for nearly a decade.

The politician announced her bid for B.C. legislature in April.

“There was no chance in hell I was going to stand on the sidelines.”

Throughout her campaign, Mark focused on youth advocacy, affordable housing, poverty reduction, and education.

“I’ve never worked so hard to get a job,” the candidate told the Vancouver Courier last year.

Mark’s First Nations heritage was also at the forefront — a part of her identity that shows how far the MLA-elect has come.

“My early days weren’t easy. There was a lot of struggle, and there certainly wasn’t a lot of pride. I faced so much racism in school, and bullies, and really had to fight — whether that [was against] the experiences that my family confronted [or] how my brothers were treated in care,” Mark said at a campaign event on Sunday.

“There was no chance in hell I was going to stand on the sidelines.”

BC Hydro Aboriginal Scholarship

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http://www.bchydro.com/community/community_investment/scholarships.html#2

 

Aboriginal Scholarships

BC Hydro is proud to support education and skill development in B.C.’s Aboriginal communities. We are committed to developing a diverse and inclusive workforce which is representative of the communities we serve.

Aboriginal scholarships are awarded to selected B.C. Aboriginal students currently enrolled in a full-time post-secondary institution or students in Grade 12 planning to pursue a full-time public post-secondary education within Canada. BC Hydro offers the following scholarships:

  • Eight $1,500 aboriginal scholarships, available to individuals who are status/non status Indians, Inuit or Métis and are residents of B.C. who plan to enrol in a full-time public post-secondary institution in Canada. Students pursuing an education in technology or engineering will be considered priority applicants, however general admission students are encouraged to apply.screenshot_10 screenshot_11
  • One $2,000 Randy Brant Memorial scholarship based on a combination of academic achievement and outstanding community involvement.

In order to provide opportunities to more British Columbians, you can only receive an award once. BC Hydro’s Aboriginal Scholarship applications are available on this website each year from January to mid-April and the scholarships are awarded in the summer months.

Applications for 2014 will be accepted January 27 to April 15, 2014. Download the 2014 Aboriginal Scholarship Application Form [PDF, 78 KB]. Please send your completed scholarship package between January 27 and April 15, 2014 (post-marked on or before April 15) to:

BC Hydro, Community Investment—Scholarship,
15th Floor, 333 Dunsmuir Street,
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 5R3

For more information about BC Hydro’s Aboriginal Education and Employment Strategy (AEES) please contact:

Jeannie Cranmer
Aboriginal Education and Employment Strategy Manager
Phone: 1 877 461 0161 #1 Employment or 604 623 4401
Email: aboriginal.employment@bchydro.com
Website: www.bchydro.com/careers

If you have any problems these documents or with the web link, please feel free to contact me.

Have a great day!