CFP

CFP – Investigating Our Practices – 20th Annual IOP Conference at UBC. Due: Feb 24

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UBC is hosting the 20th Annual IOP Conference, where practicing teachers, university educators, graduate students and student teachers from different educational contexts (schools, universities and colleges) come together to share their questions, investigations and understandings about their practice.

 

Date: May 6, 2017

Location: Neville Scarfe Building, 2125 Main Mall, UBC

 

Proposals are invited in three formats: submit a proposal for an individual or group session, host a roundtable discussion, or prepare a poster session

Submission deadline: Friday, February 24

For more information, please visit: http://iop.educ.ubc.ca

SAGE Digest & Season’s Greetings

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Dear SAGE Community,

The Office of Indigenous Education is accepting applications for the SAGE Provincial Coordinator, Graduate Academic Assistant. Please email indigenous.education@ubc.ca with any questions.

SAGE is such a wonderful community of scholars! I am truly grateful for the learning experiences, and opportunities to serve Indigenous grad students for the past two and a half years. As of September, I have become a part of the team at the First Nations House of Learning, as the Aboriginal Student and Community Development Officer. I hope to be a resource to Indigenous graduate students in this role, and to continue being an active member of SAGE while I finish my PhD. I invite all of you to drop by room 184 at the Longhouse to visit anytime – please come say hi!

Thanks and enjoy the SAGE Digest!

Aurelia Kaililani Kinslow
Provincial Coordinator (ex-officio, interim volunteer)
Supporting Aboriginal Graduate Enhancement (SAGE)

 

The SAGE blog is updated on an ongoing basis. If you have news, information and/or resources to share, please forward to grad.sage@ubc.ca.

Achievements

·      Doctoral Defence – caroline lefebvre

Call for Papers

·      Rising Up: Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies Graduate Student Conference, University of Manitoba. Due: Feb 3, 2017

·      Indigenous Expressions of Culture in Storytelling, Drama, Theatre and Performance – Traditional and Contemporary Canadian and Polish Upper Silesian Perspectives. Due: Dec 31, 2016

·      Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism; 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium Currents of Resistance, Due: Jan 13, 2017

Read more under Call for Proposals/Papers category

Course

·    Course – Reconciliation Through Indigenous Education – Register by January 23https://wordpress.com/post/gradsage.com/3938

Events

·      Upcoming SAGE events in 2017

·      CTLT, Teaching Assistants Institute

·      Graduate Pathways to Success: workshops + new graduate student orientation in January

·      Museum of Anthropology: December 2016

Read more under Events category

Funding

·      David Suzuki Fellowship program, Due: Feb 1, 2017

·      Aboriginal Graduate Fellowships, Due: Feb 10, 2017

·      Creating Humanities Communities Grant, National Endowment for the Humanities. Due: Feb 15, 2017

Read more under Funding category

Jobs

·      FT Child-care worker, Due: Dec 18, 2016

·      Department Chair, Arizona State University, American Indian Studies Program

·      Tenure-Track Job Openings, UNLV English Department

·      Indigenous Governance Program Manager, University of Arizona

·      Assistant Professor of Native American History, University of North Carolina – Pembroke

·      Wildlife Biologist, at Okanagan Nation Alliance

Read more under Jobs category

Resources

·      UBC Single Mothers Support Group

CFP – Curriculum Matters: Race, Place, and Belonging “South” of the Border, Due: Dec 11, 2017

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AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF CURRICULUM STUDIES ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Monday, April 24 – Thursday, April 27, 2017

 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: AAACS 2017

University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX

 

Priority Deadline: Sunday, December 11, 2016

Cut-Off for Submissions:  Sunday, January 8, 2017


Curriculum Matters: Race, Place, and Belonging “South” of the Border

Curriculum matters.  Race matters.  Place matters.  Epistemologies matter. And matter also matters of indigeneity, immigration and epistemicide—of the South, at the borders, and beyond.  Through this year’s conference theme—inspired, too, by the place of our convening and work of our colleagues (t)here; we invite participants to inquire, critique, ponder, dream, converse and create together through and from attention to these matters.  Herein, we aim to not only continue from last year conversations regarding our ethical, and historical, engagements (AAACS 2016), but also to further those of our affiliate and sister organizations respecting the current tasks of the curriculum theorist (IAACS 2015), where curriculum theory and its labor, in fact, stand in the present moment (Bergamo 2016)—as well as in those to come; and demands to “colour” curriculum, interrogating places therein of power, privilege and supremacy (C&P 2016).  We, too, seek responsiveness to/in a contemporary scene wherein much is contested, conflicted, complexified, and produced as nonexistent among us, particularly perhaps in the U.S./”America”, as pertains to race, place, indigeneity, immigration and epistemology—especially concerning difference, equity, solidarity and social and cognitive justice; and possibly no more so than in the “othered” South.

For example, while restorations of particular nations of the Global North have been acknowledged and taken up—and this, via the curriculum—in Canada, which necessarily involves listening to and learning from indigenous knowledges (the fruit of which was so beautifully shared at IAACS 2015), as well as in Australia (the place of our upcoming IAACS 2018 convening); such efforts are virtually nonexistent in the US, where one could argue indigeneity is largely still rendered invisible and thus inarticulable.  And we suffer still in this context without any redress—with even much repressive regress—respecting generations of racial violence, suffering and oppression.  Such questions too might be brought to bear at the borders, as it were, liminal spaces and fluid if not fractured places wherein epistemologies of the South, and of language and of citizenship, are deeply implicated, and such also with respect to education, curriculum and pedagogy.

We welcome, of course, as always, proposals on any current curriculum studies scholarship, and encourage provocative, stimulating and surprising conference formats; critical and creative conversations among us that may initiate healing and transformation, and illumine new paths and possibilities for us from within our midst.

 

Proposals are being accepted through

AAACS 2017 Proposal Guide

To submit your proposal, please follow the link: https://goo.gl/forms/EPUE2pKTZstyHObh1

For questions/inquiry regarding the conference and/or call for proposals, please email conference and program committee email at: AAACScallforproposals@gmail.com

Your proposal automatically registers you as a member of AAACS—there are presently no dues.  With membership in AAACS (www.aaacs.org) comes membership in IAACS (The International Association for the Advancement of Curriculum Studies).

 

 

CFP – ab-Original Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures

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ab-Original Journal Cover

ab-Original

Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures
    • Jakelin Troy, Editor in Chief
      Lorena Fontaine, Editor
      Adam Geczy, Editor
    • Forthcoming 2017
    • Biannual Publication
    • ISSN 2471-0938
    • E-ISSN 2470-6221

ab-Original: Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures is a journal devoted to issues of indigeneity in the new millennium. It is a multi-disciplinary journal embracing themes such as art, history, literature, politics, linguistics, health sciences and law. It is a portal for new knowledge and contemporary debate whose audience is not only that of academics and students but professionals involved in shaping policies with regard to concern relating to indigenous peoples.

Each issue will consist of 40-50,000 words. All academic articles should be approximately 6-10,000 words long. An abstract of approximately 150 words must accompany each manuscript. All articles and comprehensive review essays will be peer-reviewed. Opinion pieces or short research reports, which are not peer reviewed, should be approximately 1,500 to 3,000 words in length.

To submit an article, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/ab-original. The online system will guide you through the steps to upload your article to the editorial office.

Call for Papers, Provoking Curriculm – “Curriculum Encounters”, Due: September 6, 2016

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Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers

“Curriculum Encounters”

February 17-19, 2017

Eighth Biennial Provoking Curriculum Conference

Faculty of Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Co-sponsored by CACS (Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies)

 

Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers 2017 (PDF)

We welcome submissions to the upcoming Provoking Curriculum conference. While we invite any and all pieces that address your current work in curriculum studies, we especially invite submissions that speak to “Curriculum Encounters.”  We welcome proposals for: papers and panels; poetry, arts-informed, and performative pieces.

“Curriculum Encounters” attends to how curriculum, never politically neutral nor materially inert nor disembodied, is always ‘in the making.’ We understand ‘making curriculum’ as very different from the notion of curriculum as a “management category” preoccupied with making a “language of input and output within a production system” (Aoki, 2005, p. 271). Instead, we know that ‘making curriculum’ (as well as unmaking it) carries ethical charges, opening ourselves to encounters (past, present, future; expected and unexpected): (1) with a plurality of voices, beings and bodies, which are all in movement, (2) in spaces that may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary or transitional/in between), and that through our encounters (3) affective intensities may be produced, which can 4) inspire new ethical charges.

Therefore, the proposed theme includes the following (4) thematic strands: Plurality, Spaces, Intensities, and Charges.

 

(1) Plurality

Whose voices, beings or bodies need to be considered in our curriculum encounters? As Maxine Greene (and Hannah Arendt) remind us, plurality is “the condition of human action because we are all the same, that is, human, in such a way that nobody is ever the same as anyone else who ever lived, lives, or will live” (Greene, 1995, pp. 155-6).

(2) Spaces

What kinds of curricular spaces (e.g., disciplinary, interdisciplinary, transitional/in between, “places d’accueil”) can be created to be open to a plurality of voices, beings and/or bodies? In what kinds of spaces are curriculum boundaries made and unmade? By whom, where and why? How can such reconfigurations contribute to projects of curricular reconstruction (Pinar, 2011)?

(3) Intensities

Which curricular intensities will conduce to attuning and opening us to plurality and differences? What kinds will produce discomfort and provoke thinking? How can we become better attuned to the “affective discharges of the semiotic” (Lewkowich, 2015, p. 46) including instances “where the body takes over from … words” (Phillips in Lewkowich, 2015)?

(4) Charges

What kinds of curricular charges (e.g., responsibilities, commitments, projects, movements), might emerge from these intensities so as to catalyze consciousness and move us towards more “just and caring” classrooms and curricula (Greene, 1995, p. 167), ones that address such important contemporary issues as sustainability and wellbeing, and that can continually bring us back to the question: “What is the significance of inviting people to take up what really matters to them?” (Chambers, 1998, p. 17).

 

When submitting a proposal, include the following:

 

  • Name & e-mail address for each participant involved in the proposal
  • Institutional affiliation
  • Title of the presentation
  • 250-word abstract with a clear explanation of the presentation format

 

Please submit your proposals by September 6, 2016 to provokingcurriculummcgill@gmail.com.

 

The conference will open Friday evening with a plenary, with sessions running Saturday and Sunday, and concluding Sunday at 3:30 pm. We are anticipating publishing from the conference (e.g., journal issue; edited book): more news at the conference itself!

 

Thank you and we look forward to your submissions!

 

Provoking Curriculum Organizing Committee

Teresa Strong-Wilson (McGill) & Avril Aitken (Bishops), co-presidents of CACS, with Mindy Carter, Margaret Dobson, Christian Ehret, Lisa Starr, Paul Zanazanian (McGill), Sandra Chang-Kredl (Concordia) & McGill doctoral students Mitchell McLarnon, Shauna Rak, Abigail Shabtay, Layal Shuman, & Amarou Yoder; thank you to Shauna for permission to include the ‘provocative’ image included in this Call.

 

http://www.csse-scee.ca/cacs/news_item/provoking_curriculum_studies_2017

 

References

 

Aoki, T. (2005). In the midst of slippery theme-worlds: Living as designers of Japanese Canadian curriculum (1992). In W. Pinar and R. L. Irwin (Eds.), Curriculum in a new key: The collected works of Ted T. Aoki (pp. 263-77). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

Chambers, C. (1998). On taking my own (love) medicine: Memory work in writing and pedagogy. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 14 (4), 14-20.

 

Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts and social change.

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Lewkowich, D. (2015). Reminders of the abject in teaching: Psychoanalytic notes on my

sweaty, pedagogical self. Emotion, Space and Society, 16, 41-47.

 

Pinar, W. (2011). The character of curriculum studies: Bildung, currere, and the recurring question of the subject. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Call for papers, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference, Australia. Due: Sept 30, 2016

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THE WEARURUK RESEARCH CENTRE

INSTITUTE OF KOORIE EDUCATION DEAKIN UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA CALL FOR PAPERS

Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia 26 – 28 June 2017

The interdisciplinary conference, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia to be hosted by the Wearuruk Research Centre at the Institute of Koorie Education Deakin University will examine the impact of Indigenous Knowledge systems and approaches to research across the disciplines of the Humanities and Creative Arts, Education, Health, Law and Philosophy. It aims to extend debates on how Indigenous ontology and epistemology articulate modes of knowledge production that give rise to transforming discourses and have the capacity to solve real world problems.

Leading and emerging Scholars from Australia and overseas will extend the frontiers of this burgeoning paradigm of research through debates on how Indigenous knowledge systems have the potential to reframe western approaches to knowledge by articulating the implications, applications and benefits of indigenous research both within and beyond Indigenous communities and research arenas.

Duranbinjma-Burre denotes the idea of the growing up and nurturing of persons, ideas and entities. This notion is aligned with our aim of illuminating and advancing Indigenous Paradigms of knowledge production and transmission. The question of what new knowledge and understandings Indigenous approaches can reveal that may not be revealed by other modes of research underpins the objectives of this conference. Further questions outlined below and that provide a framework for articulating this are based on the work a group of postgraduate researchers from the Institute of Koorie Education, Deakin University Australia.

Keynote Speakers:

Reality

Distinguished Professor Hingangaroa Smith is an internationally renowned Māori educationalist who has been at the forefront of the alternative Māori initiatives in the education field and beyond. Professor Smith has made significant contributions to the political, social, economic and cultural advancement of Māori communities. He has also worked extensively with other indigenous/ First Nations peoples across the world, including Canada, Hawaii, US mainland, Taiwan, Chile, Australia and the Pacific nations.

Pausauraq Jana Harcharek has worked with the North Slope Borough School District (NSBSD) in the department of Iñupiaq Education for over fifteen years. During this time she facilitated a number of long-term projects including the Iñupiaq Education Initiative that resulted in the development of the Iñupiaq Learning Framework (ILF). Jana has been a critical force in promoting and maintaining the Iñupiaq culture, language and way of life in education.

Professor Norm Sheehan is a Wiradjuri man born in Mudgee NSW. In 2013 Professor Sheehan commenced as Director of Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples Southern Cross University. Norm’s current Respectful Design research seeks to outline and employ culturally recognisable and affirming methods to activate cultural growth and redirection within communities.

• What is reality? How is it seen and how do meanings emerge from Australian Indigenous Knowledge systems? Art and Symbols

  • What is the importance of symbols, story-telling and art in Indigenous research?
  • How are natural, symbolic, material, spiritual and ceremonial entities related in Indigenous Knowledge systems?
  • How is time viewed in Indigenous Epistemology and ontology?

    Experience

  • In what ways does the researcher’s lived experience influence and validate knowledge emerging from research
  • How does the researcher’s experience operate in relation to the experience of others? Positioning
  • How are men and women positioned in relation to Land and Country?
  • Who is seen and heard in Indigenous research?
  • How do visible/invisible and outsider/insider relations operate
  • Who benefits from the research? Who controls the research and the emergent knowledge?

    Abstracts of 250 words are invited for single authored or co- authored 20–minute presentations that address (though not exclusively nor comprehensively) the above questions for consideration through double blind refereeing. Please also include the title of your paper, a 150- word biography, institutional affiliation and full contact details with your submission
    Presenters will later be invited to submit full papers to be refereed for publication in full conference proceedings.

Please send abstracts by 30 September 2016: Ms Julie Nichols Email: j.nichols@deakin.edu.au

 

 

 

 

Funding: BC Council On Admissions & Transfer (BCCAT). Due: Sept 29, 2016

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Send on behalf of Dr. Robert Adamonski, Director of Research and Admissions: 

BCCAT is calling for research project proposals on Contemporary Issues in Student Mobility: http://www.bccat.ca/research/call

 
If you are interested in proposing a research project on a topic within the BCCAT mandate, please send a brief letter of intent by September 29, 2016 to Anna Tikina (atikina@bccat.ca). No need to wait until September to express interest – the letters of intent will be considered as they arrive. 
 
If you know someone who might be interested in proposing a project, please feel free to share this notice. 
 
Please do not hesitate to contact Anna (atikina@bccat.ca, or 604-412-7680) if you have questions about the Call.