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7th Aboriginal Math Symposium, First Nations Longhouse. 9:00 am – 3:00 pm, May 11, 2017.

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7th Aboriginal Math Symposium

 

Thursday May 11, 2017

First Nations Longhouse

1985 West Mall UBC

9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Please join us for the 7th Aboriginal Math K-12 Symposium at the First Nations Longhouse, UBC on May 11 2017. This symposium is an opportunity for teachers, administrators, Ministry representatives, community members, and academics to connect, explore, imagine and share new ideas, resources and research on Aboriginal mathematics education from kindergarten to Grade 12. Together we hope to:

  • Learn about new research in mathematics and Aboriginal education
  • Discuss and share approaches, research and educational projects for improving Aboriginal math education
  • Develop community connections to facilitate and support improving Aboriginal math education

Please direct questions about the symposium to:

Kwesi Yaro kwesi.yaro@alumni.ubc.ca
Registration open by mid March 2017.

 

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Orange Shirt Day, Faculty of Forestry, UBC – 30 Sept, 2016

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Why Orange Shirts?
Orange Shirt Day is a legacy of the St. Joseph Mission (SJM) residential school commemoration event held in Williams Lake, BC, Canada, in the spring of 2013.  It grew out of Phyllis’ story of having her shiny new orange shirt taken away on her first day of school at the Mission, and it has become an opportunity to keep the discussion on all aspects of residential schools happening annually. 

The date was chosen because it is the time of year in which children were taken from their homes to residential schools, and because it is an opportunity to set the stage for anti-racism and anti-bullying policies for the coming school year.  It also gives teachers time to plan events that will include children, as we want to ensure that we are passing the story and learning on to the next generations.


Orange Shirt Day is also an opportunity for First Nations, local governments, schools and communities to come together in the spirit of reconciliation and hope for generations of children to come.

CFP – Conceptualizing Children & Youth Conference, Brock University. Due: April 28, 2016

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CALL FOR PAPERS

CONCEPTUALIZING CHILDREN AND YOUTH CONFERENCE

Brock University – October 12-14, 2016

Brock University’s Department of Child and Youth Studies announces “Conceptualizing Children and Youth”   a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary conference. All disciplines, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to research within Child and Youth Studies are welcome. The Conference will be held October  12-14, 2016 at Brock University in St. Catharines Ontario.

 

The conference will include keynote speakers, special evening events, networking opportunities, and graduate student events. There will be highlighted sessions on child and youth engagement in sport/performance; child and youth health/mental health; diverse children and youth; education contexts; Indigenous children and youth research; social issues facing children and youth; transdisciplinary in child  and youth research. There will also be additional dissemination opportunities.

 

To submit please complete the attached abstract form to dzinga@brocku.ca by April 28, 2016. Submissions may take the form of posters, individual papers, symposiums, or workshops.  Notification of results will be communicated by June 30, 2016.

 

Dawn Zinga, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Brock University 905-688-5550, ext.3152, Cairns 325

Early Intervention with Indigenous Families & Children in British Columbia: A critical inquiry. Presentation by Dr. Alison Gerlach. 12-1 pm, Jan 14, 2016

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CRiHHI_AGerlach-FINALEarly Intervention with Indigenous Families & Children in   British Columbia : A critical inquiry

Presentation by Alison J Gerlach, PhD, MSc (OT), Assistant Clinical Professor, Dept. of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy, UBC

DATE: Thursday, January 14, 2016

TIME: 12:00 – 1:00 pm

VENUE: Room T206
UBC School of Nursing
3rd Floor of the UBC Hospital [MAP]
2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC

Early childhood intervention (ECI) programs are increasingly recognized for their potential in promoting children’s health and well-being, and appear to be ideally positioned to play a vital role in fostering child health equity. Currently, there is a lack of research on ECI programs in the context of Indigenous families and children in Canada. This seminar will present the findings of a critical qualitative inquiry undertaken in partnership with the Aboriginal Infant Development Program (AIDP) of British Columbia.

Dr. Alison Gerlach is an occupational therapy-researcher who has worked for many years in partnership with Indigenous communities, organizations and colleagues on a shared agenda of promoting children’s health and wellbeing. Alison’s doctoral research is one of the few studies internationally that draws on critical theoretical perspectives and an ‘ an equity lens’ to examine how ECI can contribute towards fostering health equity for Indigenous infants and young children. The findings of this study have implications for all healthcare professionals working with Indigenous and non-Indigenous families and children who experience social disadvantages as a result of structural inequities.

The Human Rights of Aboriginal Children – Jan 21, 2016, 7 pm

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The Human Rights of Aboriginal Children

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When: Thursday, January 21, 2016  |  7 p.m.
Where: Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Boulevard

Keynote speakers:
  • Dr. Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, BC Representative for Children and Youth
  • Dr. Michael DeGagné, President and Vice-Chancellor of Nipissing University

“How to Love a Child”, the Janusz Korczak Lecture Series, is devoted to key issues crucial to the well-being and rights of children and young people today.

The goal of the lecture series is to foster conversations among academics, professionals and child advocates from diverse fields concerned with the welfare of the child. A range of disciplines and expertise including law, medicine, child welfare and education are represented in this series, and a variety of perspectives and issues will be addressed.
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Justin Trudeau signals new approach to relationship with Indigenous people

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Justin Trudeau signals new approach to relationship with Indigenous people

Ceremony included recognition of traditional Algonquin territory and performances from Indigenous children

By Connie Walker, CBC News Posted: Nov 04, 2015 4:34 PM ETLast Updated: Nov 04, 2015 5:51 PM ET

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The first sign that this government is taking a new approach to its relationship with indigenous people came when Theland Kicknosway, a 12-year-old Cree drummer, led the way into Rideau Hall today for the swearing-in of Justin Trudeau and his cabinet.

There has been indigenous participation in the past, but today’s ceremony was clearly meant to symbolize a new relationship with indigenous people and the government of Canada.

The Cree boy’s song ended and was quickly followed with an acknowledgement the gathering was on traditional Algonquin territory.

The ceremony also featured giggling Inuit throat singers who stole the show and wrapped up with three Métis jiggers.

Two indigenous ministers were sworn into Trudeau’s cabinet: Jody Wilson-Raybould (Kwakwaka’wakw) was named minister of justice; and Hunter Tootoo (Inuit) is the new minister of fisheries and the Canadian Coast Guard.

Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett Nov 4 2015

Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett is sworn-in during the ceremony at Rideau Hall. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

But perhaps the most symbolic change was the renaming of Aboriginal and Northern Affairs to Indigenous and Northern Affairs.

The new minister is longtime aboriginal affairs critic Carolyn Bennett, who held an eagle feather and a braid of sweetgrass as she was sworn in.

Hayden King, professor of Indigenous governance at Ryerson University, says the name change will be welcome in the indigenous community.

cree drummer cabinet

Cree drummer Theland Kicknosway, 12, leads the procession into Rideau Hall before Justin Trudeau is sworn in as Canada’s 23rd prime minister. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

“Obviously Trudeau wants to be sensitive to indigenous people and the name change reflects a change in approach — it’s adopting our language. In that sense it’s hard to critique the change.”

King said the term indigenous has become preferred over aboriginal.

“I think indigenous is a term that actual native people, indigenous peoples, originated themselves. It comes from us as a people, so I think that’s one reason that people prefer it.”

“Aboriginal is kind of a status, legal, domestication of indigenous concerns, whereas indigenous or indigeneity is kind of sovereigntist, more authentic term used by indigenous people themselves.”

A video of Theland’s drumming posted on Facebook  quickly gained thousands of views and shares.


And many of the comments contain the word hope.

But King is not convinced the symbolism will result in the “real change” that Trudeau has promised indigenous Canadians.

“Everybody wants to be hopeful. I want to be hopeful, I want to be optimistic, but I am a student of history and my reservoir of cynicism is deep. There do seem to be some positive signs, but at the same time, we know what is going to happen.”

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Inuit throat singers at swearing-in ceremony 0:54

CBC News Aboriginal: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/justin-trudeau-signals-new-approach-to-relationship-with-indigenous-people-1.3304234?cmp=abfb

Continue on the path towards health and reconciliation: Indigenous Health Conference 2016

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May 26-27, 2016  |  Hilton Meadowvale, Mississauga ON

Continue on the path towards health and reconciliation
In 2014, the inaugural Indigenous Health Conference was a call to action for health equity for Indigenous peoples in Canada. The conference was the first of its kind in Canada and attracted enormous media attention including the Globe and Mail, CBC radio and Metro Morning.

Building upon this success, the 2nd biennial
Indigenous Health Conference will continue the dialogue and focus on the determinants of health and reconciliation. Sessions will discuss working towards reconciliation, major health issues for Indigenous peoples in Canada and also potential solutions to address them.

The conference is led by
Dr. Anna Banerji, a member of the Order of Ontario and an advocate for Indigenous women and children.

Please join us again to continue on the path towards health and reconciliation.