Colonizing Narratives

Facing ‘colonial history’ key for Indigenous youth: Crime Prevention Ottawa

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Broader cultural education could help steer Indigenous youth away from criminal justice system, author says

CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:54 PM ETLast Updated: Feb 14, 2017 8:53 PM ET

Melanie Bania presented the results of her study on preventing the criminalization of Indigenous youth at Ottawa City Hall on Tuesday. (Giacomo Panico/CBC )

A renewed focus on broader cultural education that confronts rather than ignores Canada’s “colonial history” could help steer Indigenous youth away from the criminal justice system, according to a new report by Crime Prevention Ottawa.

The report, titled Culture as Catalyst: Preventing the Criminalization of Indigenous Youth, was released during a presentation at Ottawa City Hall Tuesday morning.

Marc Maracle is the chair of the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, which helped lay the groundwork and provide background information for the report. (Roger Dubois/CBC)

According to the report, traumatic events stemming from “colonizing policies” such as the residential school system contribute to the disproportionately high rates of poverty, poor education and unsafe housing experienced by Indigenous people in Canada.
As a result, the paper concludes, Indigenous youth and adults are highly over-represented in the Canadian criminal justice system.
“The research also shows that a connection to culture is very important for all young people, but that for Indigenous people in particular that connection to culture is directly linked to their sense of identity,” said Melanie Bania, the report’s author. Read More…

Building Legal Colonialism: Liberal Enclosure and Indigenous Self-Determination. 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Jan 10, 2017

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Building Legal Colonialism:
Liberal Enclosure and
Indigenous Self-Determination

An Inaugural Lecture at the
Peter A. Allard School of Law

Professor Gordon Christie’s research focuses on questions of Aboriginal rights. He has published on many of the signal decisions in Canadian Aboriginal law, from Delgamuukw to Tsilhqot’in Nation, and his work explores a broad range of issues, including Aboriginal rights and title, Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and processes of consultation and accommodation. As an Indigenous scholar, Professor Christie has been an important voice as well in the development of thinking on Indigenous legal traditions. His most recent project involves an attempt to move beyond the dominant mode of critical analysis with respect to Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal rights, which relies on and champions particular, but often conflicting, normative theories of the law to analyse court decisions. His forthcoming book, Making Sense of Aboriginal Rights: An Exercise in Methodological Naturalism, explores the question of how the nature of the law might be theorized in a way that allows for a non-normative description and explanation of the dynamics of Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal questions, in terms of the actions of one meaning-generating community—the settler state and its legal institutions—with relation to numerous and varied Indigenous meaning-generating communities.

Professor Christie joined the Allard School of Law at UBC in 2004, serving as Academic Director of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program from 2005 to 2016. Prior to coming to Allard Law he held a faculty appointment at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University), where he was also Director of the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments. He obtained B.A. in Philosophy from Princeton University, followed by an LL.B. from the University of Victoria and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Barbara. At the Allard School of Law, he teaches in the areas of aboriginal law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as first-year Torts.

TUESDAY
JAN 10, 2017
5:30 – 6:30PM
Allard Hall,
Franklin Lew Forum
The Inaugural Lecture tradition at the Allard School of Law celebrates the promotion of faculty members to full Professor with a public lecture addressed to the broad themes of their scholarly work.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP
Peter A. Allard School of Law
The University of British Columbia
Allard Hall, 1822 East Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
T 604.822.6335
http://www.allard.ubc.ca

Intertextual Reading Group with Glen Coulthard. 1-2pm, March 8, 2016

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You are invited to join Dr. Glen Coulthard, who will read from his critically acclaimed book, Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition (University of Minnesota Press, 2014). Intertextual: Art in Dialogue is an ongoing reading group held across a range of visual art institutions in Vancouver that takes place between January and October 2016.

Dr. Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and part of the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at UBC. He has written and published numerous articles and chapters in the areas of Indigenous thought and politics, contemporary political theory and radical social and political thought.

Tuesday, March 8, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, UBC

Amazon Indian protests outside Jimmy Nelson photo exhibition in London

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Nixiwaka Yawanawá protested against the 'outrageous' exhibition of Jimmy Nelson's work at London's Atlas Gallery today, wearing his ceremonial headdress.

Nixiwaka Yawanawá protested against the ‘outrageous’ exhibition of Jimmy Nelson’s work at London’s Atlas Gallery today, wearing his ceremonial headdress.
© Sophie Pinchetti/Survival

An Amazon Indian protested outside the exhibition of controversial photographer Jimmy Nelson’s work “Before They Pass Away” at London’s Atlas Gallery today.

Nelson’s work has been attacked by indigenous peoples around the world, as well as Survival International – the global movement for tribal peoples’ rights – for portraying afalse and damaging picture of tribal peoples.

Nixiwaka Yawanawá from Acre state in Brazil handed a letter to the gallery and said, “As a tribal person I feel offended by Jimmy Nelson’s work ’Before They Pass Away’. It’s outrageous! We are not passing away but struggling to survive. Industrialized society is trying to destroy us in the name of ‘progress’, but we will keep defending our lands and contributing to the protection of the planet.”

Read the letter to London’s Atlas Gallery (pdf, 10MB)

Famed photographer Jimmy Nelson's work 'Before They Pass Away' has been attacked by tribal peoples around the world.

Famed photographer Jimmy Nelson’s work ‘Before They Pass Away’ has been attacked by tribal peoples around the world.
© Jimmy Nelson/teNeues

While Nelson claims his work is “ethnographic fact”, Survival Director Stephen Corrydenounces it as a photographer’s fantasy which bears little relationship either to how the people pictured look now, or how they ever appeared. Nelson’s subjects are supposed to be “passing away”, but no mention is made of the genocidal violence they are being subjected to. …Read More