Columbia University

Columbia University Fellowship for Historical Dialogue and Accountability

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Please note that the deadline for applications is 7 March 2014.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Alliance for Historical Dialogue Fellowship Program
Fall 2014 (August 26, 2014 –December 15, 2014)

The Institute for the Study of Human Rights (ISHR) at Columbia University is now accepting applications to for its residence Fellowship for Historical Dialogue and Accountability.

Practitioners of historical dialogue and accountability from conflict, post-conflict and postdictatorial societies will have the opportunity to engage in training, networking, project work, academic and applied study. The comprehensive program provides Fellows with the opportunity to hone practical skills in fundraising, advocacy and leadership, to develop a deeper understanding of dealing with the past, and to foster mutually beneficial relationships with their peers and with international and non-profit organizations in New York City and Washington, DC.

The Program is designed for NGO practitioners, journalists, lawyers, teachers, social workers, community organizers, and others working on issues including (but not limited to) transitional justice, truth and reconciliation, historical conflict, indigenous and minority rights, social accountability, memory studies, oral history, sites of memory and related areas where historical dialogue is a central component. Preference will be given to those who can demonstrate an established work record of several years relating to historical dialogue and accountability. More details and the application can be found at www.hrcolumbia.org/ahda/.

CFP: The Crypt(ic)

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The Crypt(ic)

Institute for Comparative Literature and Society – Annual Graduate Student Conference

Columbia University, New York

March 29, 2014

Keynote speaker: Gail Scott (Université de Montréal)

“The distortion of a text resembles a murder: the difficulty is not in perpetrating the deed, but in getting rid of its traces.” Freud, Moses and Monotheism.

The architectural crypt is the site of sacred relics situated outside of the space of religious practice. It is the foundation that is permanently hidden from view, its animating sanctity alien to the rituals of worship that it legitimates. Exegesis begins with a death that is the crypt of writing. For Freud, this distortion of text is both a transformation and a displacement: the transformation of lived memory into a documentary apparatus and its displacement to a site of repetition and reproduction. What escapes the “bottleneck of the signifier” is rendered spectral – a ghostly presence haunting the regimes of meaning.

The Crypt(ic) proposes to explore the spaces rendered obscure by regimes of signification, yet constitutive of both the content and the delimitation of meaning. The social and political articulate this relationship. For Marx, there is no value without surplus and no labor without estrangement; the obscure precedes and delineates its normative condition. The categories of (non-surplus) value and (unalienated) labor are the particular, perhaps illusory, conditions of a cryptic generality. Likewise, the political as the contestation of power is obscured from politics as the instantiation of power. A mind trained in the globalized humanities towards reading the (social) text of the past and of our own time can try to break the code that conceals the crypt(ic) from plain view, perhaps putting it in a position where it itself encrypts again: the question remains how to wrestle with this double bind in an ever-unfinished attempt to change its course, to put it to work.

We welcome papers that explore obscurity, estrangement, concealment, and displacement across the humanities and the social sciences. To consider conditions in which the hidden precedes the particular necessarily disrupts disciplinary boundaries. Papers might consider the constitution of “the other” within the construction of normativity; practices of the archive or of digitalization within the humanities; alienation and estrangement in political, economic, and social theory; the uncanny, the occult, and the monstrous in art and literature; subalternity as conditioned by the history of (post)coloniality and globality; the (in)visibility of the race, class, and (heteronormative) gender lines; repression, abreaction, and parapraxis in psychoanalytic theory; or the role of chaos or the abyss in metaphysics and epistemology. We likewise welcome discussion of the hidden or obscure in contemporary theory such as, but not limited to, Rancière’s Dissensus,Castoriadis and Lefort’s notions of the political, Derrida’s Parergon, Deleuze’s Body without Organs, or recent reassessments of Fanon and Beauvoir.

Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to iclsgradconf@gmail.com by January 15, 2014.