Communities

Job – Director, Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies – Faculty of Arts

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The Faculty of Arts at The University of British Columbia – Vancouver campus invites applications from experienced scholars and academic leaders for the position of Director of the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (CIS), with an anticipated start date of July 1, 2018. The University is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territories of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people, with whom UBC shares a framework Memorandum of Affiliation. The Institute is committed to critical decolonial social change and theoretical advancement, research excellence, community engagement, land-based learning, and international impact. Information about the Institute and each of its constituent programs— First Nations and Indigenous Studies (FNIS) and First Nations and Endangered Languages (FNEL)—is available on their respective websites: http://fnis.arts.ubc.ca/ and http://fnel.arts.ubc.ca/.

 

The Directorship appointment is expected to be for a five-year term, with the possibility for reappointment. There is potential for cross-appointment with other academic units, but primary teaching and service responsibilities will be within the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies.

 

We seek applicants who have a Ph.D., a distinguished record of research publications commensurate with appointment at the Associate Professor rank or higher, a demonstrated record of high quality undergraduate and graduate teaching, a track record of successful graduate supervision, a background in establishing and maintaining trusting relationships with Indigenous communities and organizations, and the necessary skills and experience that demonstrate capacity for leadership in an academic setting.  Prior administrative experience in a leadership role will be an asset. We encourage applicants with a demonstrated commitment to advancing areas of research currently represented in the Institute.

 

Engagement with Indigenous communities and organizations is central to the work of the Institute, and we seek candidates who understand the importance of relationship building to their work as leaders. The successful applicant will be a creative, effective, and collaborative leader who fosters an environment of respectful inclusion for students, staff, faculty, and community partners. The Institute Director’s responsibilities will include recruiting and evaluating faculty, developing Institute-wide and University-wide initiatives, maintaining and enhancing respectful partnerships with our Musqueam hosts, overseeing the educational and community programs and the financial health of the unit.

 

This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

 

Applications should be sent in a single PDF to Laura J. Hart (Manager – Admin & HR, Dean of Arts Office) via email (Arts.Headships@ubc.ca) with the following components: a letter of application; a curriculum vitae; evidence of teaching effectiveness; and 5 statements (no longer than 1 page each) summarizing their (a) research program, (b) experience in respectful and community-centred administrative leadership, (c) teaching philosophy/practice and ability to work with a diverse student body committed to decolonization, (d) Indigenous community engagement, and (e) potential contributions to the Institute.

 

Review of applications will begin on October 2, 2017, and will continue until the position is filled. We thank all who express interest in this position, however, only those applicants who are longlisted will be contacted further.

 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Course – Reconciliation Through Indigenous Education – Register by January 23

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This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) will help you envision how Indigenous histories, perspectives, worldviews, and approaches to learning can be made part of the work we do in classrooms, organizations, communities, and our everyday experiences in ways that are thoughtful and respectful. In this course, reconciliation emphasizes changing institutional structures, practices, and policies, as well as personal and professional ideologies to create environments that are committed to strengthening our relationships with Indigenous peoples.

 

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to take the MOOC, it is not just for teachers and will build competence and understanding applicable across a variety of communities.

 

Dates: January 24 – March 7, 2017

Location:  Online (asynchronous, approximately 2-4 hours per week)

This online course is delivered using the edX platform. For course details and how to register, please see http://pdce.educ.ubc.ca/MOOC

Register at https://www.edx.org/course/reconciliation-through-indigenous-ubcx-indedu200x-1 by January 23

Call for Abstracts – WIPCE Conference in Toronto. Due: Aug 31st, 2016

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The World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education (WIPCE) 2017 will be hosted by  Six Nations Polytechnic and Tap Resources on July 24th – July 29th, 2017 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The deadline for abstract submissions is August 31st, 2016.

Six Nations Polytechnic and TAP Resources are excited to host the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education – the most prestigious Indigenous education event the world has to offer!

We are very grateful to the Native Hawaiian Education Association, WIPCE 2014 host, for their kindness, generosity, wisdom and most of all, their friendship as we transition to 2017.

Our team is working hard to plan an exceptional experience that showcases Indigenous peoples of this territory and beyond, with assistance from Tourism Toronto, sponsors and community partners.

Please check our website frequently for news, updates, and more! http://www.wipce2017.com/

Let the adventure begin – We look forward to sharing an exciting and unforgettable experience with you in Toronto, 2017!

Job – Aboriginal Infant Development Worker, Westbank First Nation. May 13, 2016

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TITLE: Aboriginal Infant Development Worker SALARY: Commensurate with experience DEPARTMENT: Early Years – Community Services TERM: Full Time Term (4 years)

POSITION SUMMARY:

*WFN BAND MEMBER PREFERRED*

The Aboriginal Infant Development Worker is a fixed-term, grant-funded position primarily responsible for providing support and services to families with children aged 0 – 6 with a focus on birth to age 3.

 

  • Interested applicants should email an application form, cover letter, and resume by Friday, May 13, 2016.Recruitment/Training & Development Coordinator Westbank First Nation
    301-515 Hwy 97 South, Kelowna, BC V1Z 3J2 Fax: (250) 769-4377
    Email: careers@wfn.ca

Full Posting: Aboriginal Infant Dev Worker

 

Presentation by the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. 10 – 11 am, March 5, 2016

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Presentation by the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

All students and community members are invited to attend a presentation by the Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould, Canada’s newest Attorney General, and a graduate of the UBC Allard School of Law, who will be discussing her vision and role as the Minister of Justice.

Saturday, March 5, 10:00-11:00 AM
Jack Poole Hall, The Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre

Please RSVP for this event as seating is limited. Light refreshments will be served.

Mexican Indigenous Ask Pope to Apologize for Mass Genocide

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Mexican Indigenous Ask Pope to Apologize for Mass Genocide


The Supreme Indigenous Council of Michoacan, Mexico, accused the Catholic Church of being complicit in the killing of over 24 million Indigenous people.

Some 30 Indigenous communities of Michoacan, Mexico, have released a statement demanding Pope Francis apologize for the genocide committed with the complicity of the Catholic Church against their people during the Spanish invasion of the Americas in the 16th century.

"For over 500 years, the original people of the Americas have been ransacked, robbed, murdered, exploited, discriminated and persecuted,” the Supreme Indigenous Council of Michoacan said in a statement.

    In 2015, Pope Francis "issued a sweeping apology for crimes of the Church against the indigenous during the conquest of the Americas." — ¡Gabe! Ortíz (@TUSK81) February 6, 2016

    #Vatican spokesman says Pope Francis means to give blessing to use of indigenous languages at Catholic masses in Mexico — Joshua McElwee (@joshjmac) February 5, 2016

“Within this framework, the Catholic Church has historically been complicit and allies of those who invaded our land,” they added.

Various Purepechas communities from Michoacan demanded that the pope make a public statement apologizing for the church's role in the genocide and ongoing disappearance of the Indigenous people of Mexico.

The council also denounced that with weapons and the help of Catholic missionaries, a culture, language, religion and other European values were imposed on the people of Mexico.

"The Bible was the ideological weapon of the Conquerors,” they added ahead of the pope's visit to Mexico, which begins Feb. 12.

The Spanish intervention and invasion of the Americas represents one of the biggest acts of genocide in history, they said.

“The arrival of the Europeans meant the interruption and destruction of various original civilizations, which had their unique ideas and concepts of the world, our own government, writings, languages, education, religion and philosophy,” the statement added.

The “European invaders” caused the death of 95 percent of the the total Indigenous population within 130 years after the unfortunate arrival of Christopher Columbus and Hernan Cortes, the council noted.

They highlighted that before the Spaniards arrived to the Mexican region, there were about 25.2 million Indigenous people, and that after 1623, less than 700,000 were left.

The pope is scheduled to visit Morelia, the capital of Michoacan, Feb. 16.

Last year, First Nations people also demanded the pope apologize for the genocide committed by colonization. 

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Mexican-Indigenous-Ask-Pope-to-Apologize-for-Massive-Genocide-20160207-0033.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english

Indigenous Voices Unifying Central America: First Central American Indigenous Radio Conference to Take Place in Panama

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Indigenous Voices Unifying Central America: 
First Central American Indigenous Radio Conference to Take Place in Panama
From January 16-18, 2016 Cultural Survival, Fundación Comunicándonos, AMARC (Central American Sub region), Voces Indígenas Panamá, the General Guna Congress, Asociación Sobrevivencia Cultural and Indigenous community radio representatives will bring together representatives from Indigenous community radio stations in every country in Central America for the First Central American Indigenous Community Radio Conference: Indigenous Voices Unifying the Region. The event will spearhead a regional Indigenous community radio network for sharing resources, technologies, good practices, political strategies, and building international political support, all with the goal of supporting Indigenous Peoples’ struggle in defense of their identity, land, and human rights.

“We believe that this conference is an opportunity to come together as Indigenous Peoples and unify efforts to maintain our voice in the promotion of our cultures as a human right,” said Anselmo Xunic, Program Manager for Cultural Survival’s Community Media Program. Indigenous Peoples have a unique need for their community media, since it is through the media that they can communicate about issues that affect them, organize themselves, and strengthen their languages and cultures.

Community radio legislation in Central America is very limited. Throughout the region, both television and radio frequencies are monopolized by the commercial media, and the States in the region see communication not as a human right but as a commercial good, despite resolutions by UNESCO and the United Nations and the Organization of American States Special Rapporteurs on Freedom of Expression.
Many Indigenous community radio stations throughout Central America already function as members of networks, which has benefited their communities’efforts. In Guatemala, community radio stations have been working for over 16 years to pass a law that would give them a legal means of accessing radio frequencies, despite the fact that Guatemala’s constitution and Peace Accords require democratic access to radio frequencies. As they wait, Guatemala’s Indigenous community radio stations operate under the threat of raids, attacks, and closures by the police.
“Without freedom of expression, no other rights can be guaranteed. Indigenous Peoples demand radio frequencies to have their voices heard and to strengthen our languages, self-governance, information, and education. The Conference will serve to analyze these issues and collaborate to demand that the States in the region provide equal access to media, which is a human right, not a right of businesses,” said Cesar Gomez, Cultural Survival.
“This Conference provides motivation to share experiences and find strategies that make the right to freedom of expression more viable.  Putting our efforts together at the international level reverberates locally. It opens doors to women’s participation, both young and old,” said Rosy González, Indigenous Rights Radio Producer.
The First Central American Indigenous Community Radio Conference will take place January 16-18, 2016 in the Comarca Guna Yala in Panama with the participation of over 40 Indigenous leaders from the Kuna territory, Indigenous women and active members of community radios from throughout Central America. Half of the participants are women who demonstrate a strong commitment to the democratization of media for Indigenous Peoples and women, two sectors who have historically not been given sufficient voice in public media.
“The Conference will be a space for those of us who continue to work towards democratization of communication in the region to get to know each other better and to recognize the work that each is doing. It is a space to reflect on and share experiences and most importantly to continue weaving dreams and actions for an inclusive, just and democratic Central America. We come from every country in the region with the will to work, synergize, and most importantly spread the word on our fight against commercial media oligopolies,” said Oscar Pérez, Director of Fundación Comunicándonos.

The participants will develop a follow-up plan and draft an Outcome Document to record shared principles, conclusions, and follow-up.

Partners: Cultural Survival, Asociacion Sobrevivencia Cultural, Fundación Comunicándonos,  AMARC Central America, and Voces Indigenas Panama
Join us virtually:
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.
  • Be a part of the conversation by using the hashtags #voicesindigenasCA #IndigenousvoicesCA
For more information on the Freedom of Expression and Community Radio in Central America, visit www.cs.org.
Contact: 
Angelica Rao:
 angelica@cs.org, +1-647-624-3084
Teresita Mendoza: teresita@culturalsurvival.org, 505-87734907 505-85285412 (en espanol)

A ‘Really Cool Squash’ Makes A Comeback In Wisconsin After 800 Years

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A ‘Really Cool Squash’ Makes A Comeback In Wisconsin After 800 Years

Gete Okosomin Was Only Recently Discovered By Archaeologists
By Cheyenne Lentz
Friday, October 30, 2015, 2:05pm

Gete (GATE-ay) Okosomin (oh-COHS-suh-min) is Ojibwe for “really cool squash.” According to Kevin Schoessow  — an agricultural development agent with the University of Wisconsin-Extension — it’s the perfect name to describe an ancient kind of squash that was only recently discovered in Wisconsin.

“The story goes, about 10 years ago, there was an archaeological dig somewhere in the Green Bay area or in Menominee territory, and they found a clay vessel — a clay ball,” said Shoessow. “And they picked it up, and lo and behold, it had a little rattle.”

When the researchers cracked the ball open, Schoessow said, they found squash seeds within. They estimated that the ball had been preserving the seeds for about 800 years.

But perhaps even more remarkably, researchers also found that the seeds were still viable. Flash forward to today, and five generations of the squash known as Gete Okosomin have been produced.

Having been given one of the fruit as a gift from the Lac Courte Oreilles tribe, Schoessow likened the flavor to that of an acorn squash, but much sweeter. The shape, he said, is similar to that of a banana squash.

“The one I had was only six-and-a-half pounds, but they grow closer to 18 or 20 in the first generation,” Schoessow said.

The seeds thus far have been shared with just a select few in order to protect indigenous culture and foods, he said. However, people will soon be able to see the squash on display at the Teaching and Display Garden at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station.

“We really just want to kind of just honor the heritage of this particular squash,” Schoessow said. “There’s a lot of cool heirloom varieties that we need to bring back and that’s exactly what we’re trying to do with this one.”

Notably, the All-America Selections organization recently awarded the Spooner research station second place in the National Landscape Design Contest. Read more about the station’s garden here.

Guest(s):
Producer(s):

CFP – 14th Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS) – Deadline Extended: Jan. 4, 2016

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14th Annual Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium

Transformation through Indigenous Research and Knowledge

Friday, March 4, 2016 5:00 – 8:00 pm; Saturday, March 5, 2016 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Location: University of British Columbia, Longhouse
Keynote: Dr. Pamela D. Palmater, Ryerson University

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2016 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

**Extended** DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: January 4, 2015

The University and Community have shaped each other for some time now. This year the Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS) invites submissions that explore transformation through Indigenous Research and Knowledge by thinking about how research interacts with community and how community shapes research. Please use this wordle to find inspiration for your abstract.

Indigenous graduate students or graduate students whose research relates to Indigenous scholarship in any discipline or across disciplines are invited to submit an individual or group proposal limited to 150 words to grad.sage@ubc.ca by January 4, 2016. Please include with your proposal: the type of presentation, title, presenter(s) name(s), graduate program/university, and email. Please note that preference will be given to proposals that address the conference theme. However, proposals on Indigenous topics that do not address the theme will still be considered. We look forward to sharing multidisciplinary presentations and networking with student colleagues from near and far, in a comfortable, supportive community of scholars.

Your work-­‐in-­‐progress or finished projects may be shared in two ways:

  • Poster session. This format is open to your creativity. It provides an opportunity for you toshare your work with symposium participants during lunch.
  • Oral research presentation. This format supports a more formal opportunity to share your research or academic project in a 20-­‐minute presentation to a small audience. 

    We look forward to hearing from you! Please let us know if you have any questions: grad.sage@ubc.ca Hosted by the IGSS Planning Committee & SAGE (Supporting Aboriginal Graduate Enhancement) The University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University and SAGE Partnership IGSS 2016 Call for Proposals-deadline extended.jpg