community and culture

Facing ‘colonial history’ key for Indigenous youth: Crime Prevention Ottawa

Posted on

Broader cultural education could help steer Indigenous youth away from criminal justice system, author says

CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:54 PM ETLast Updated: Feb 14, 2017 8:53 PM ET

Melanie Bania presented the results of her study on preventing the criminalization of Indigenous youth at Ottawa City Hall on Tuesday. (Giacomo Panico/CBC )

A renewed focus on broader cultural education that confronts rather than ignores Canada’s “colonial history” could help steer Indigenous youth away from the criminal justice system, according to a new report by Crime Prevention Ottawa.

The report, titled Culture as Catalyst: Preventing the Criminalization of Indigenous Youth, was released during a presentation at Ottawa City Hall Tuesday morning.

Marc Maracle is the chair of the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, which helped lay the groundwork and provide background information for the report. (Roger Dubois/CBC)

According to the report, traumatic events stemming from “colonizing policies” such as the residential school system contribute to the disproportionately high rates of poverty, poor education and unsafe housing experienced by Indigenous people in Canada.
As a result, the paper concludes, Indigenous youth and adults are highly over-represented in the Canadian criminal justice system.
“The research also shows that a connection to culture is very important for all young people, but that for Indigenous people in particular that connection to culture is directly linked to their sense of identity,” said Melanie Bania, the report’s author. Read More…
Advertisements

New Issue of Canadian Journal of Education

Posted on Updated on

Canadian Journal of Education

Canadian Journal of Education/Revue canadienne de l’éducation has just published its latest issue [Vol 39, No 4 (2016)] at http://www.cje-rce.ca/index.php/cje-rce. We invite you to review the Table of Contents on our site and review articles and items of interest.

Editorial/Éditorial

Editorial | December 2016 PDF
Christopher DeLuca, Theodore M. Christou 1-3

Articles

Les enseignants issus de la diversité ethnoculturelle représentent-ils une valeur ajoutée pour la profession ? Résultats d’une étude menée en Suisse romande PDF (Français)
Stéphanie Bauer, Abdeljalil Akkari 1-25
Documenter les façons de faire d’enseignants de 6e année du primaire en mathématiques, en lecture et en écriture dans toutes les étapes de la démarche d’évaluation PDF (Français)
Lakshmee Devi Ramoo, Micheline-Joanne Durand 1-24
Revisiting the Challenges Linked to Parenting and Home–School Relationships at the High School Level PDF
Rollande Deslandes, Sylvie Barma 1-32
Développer le sens du métier pour favoriser le bienêtre en formation initiale à l’enseignement PDF (Français)
Nancy Goyette 1-29
Enseigner en milieu francophone minoritaire canadien: synthèse des connaissances sur les défis et leurs implications pour la formation des enseignants PDF (Français)
Martine Cavanagh, Laurent Cammarata, Sylvie Blain 1-32
From Cultural Deprivation to Individual Deficits: A Genealogy of Deficiency in Inuit Adult Education PDF
Scott McLean 1-28
Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education PDF
Chris Gilham, Joanne Tompkins 1-25
Étude de conditions didactiques favorables à la décontextualisation des connaissances mathématiques PDF (Français)
Virginie Houle 1-19
Lire des textes de fiction et des textes informatifs aux élèves du préscolaire et du primaire : analyse des interactions extratextuelles des enseignants PDF (Français)
Anne-Marie Dionne 1-28
Evolving Practices: Admissions Policies in Ontario Teacher Education Programs PDF
Michael Holden, Julian Kitchen 1-28

Book Reviews/Recensions d’ouvrages

Indigenous Business in Canada: Principles and Practices PDF
Melanie Nelson, Matthew Waugh 1-4
Self-Construction and Social Transformation: Lifelong, Lifewide and Life-deep Learning PDF
Carl Ruest 1-4
GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance PDF
Richard Morehouse

Funding – Creating Humanities Communities Grant, National Endowment for the Humanities. Due: Feb 15, 2017

Posted on

Please see the grant announcement below.  NEH is looking to fund projects and programs in key “incentive areas” which include Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.  These projects can and should be collaborations between an institution, such as a university or university program, and a community entity, like a tribal community or tribal program.  The grants are smaller in nature due to their matching requirement, but matching funds can be raised over the course of three years.  NEH staff is available for consultation throughout the application process.  Please consider applying and pass along to others in these states for their consideration.  Application Deadline is February 15, 2017. 

 

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced Creating Humanities Communities, a new grant that supports grassroots humanities programs by encouraging partnerships and collaborations between multiple institutions or organizations in a town, county, region, or area. NEH hopes that the relationships built and strengthened through Creating Humanities Communities will lead to increases and improvements in humanities infrastructure for years to come, even beyond the initial activities funded by these grants.

 

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

Posted on

Aaron Carapella Son Sequoyah
Courtesy Brian McDermott
“Map guy” Aaron Carapella is pictured here with his son, Sequoyah.

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

4/10/15

In the beginning, there were no lines.

Prior to 1492, North America was a vast wilderness: an expanse of rolling hills, open plains and meandering rivers. There were no state boundaries, no borders between countries and no private property.

That’s what Aaron Carapella captures in his Tribal Nations Maps, the only known maps that show what Turtle Island looked like before European contact.

“There are a lot of horrible maps out there that stereotype Native Americans or provide misinformation,” said Carapella, who lives in Stigler, Oklahoma. “We need something to combat that. We need maps that aren’t divided by modern countries and political borders, that show where tribes were and what they were called.”

The original Tribal Nations Map, released in 2012, is a poster-sized replica of the United States, minus the state lines. Roughly 590 Native nations are spread across the map, identified by their indigenous names, traditional locations and, when possible, historic images.

Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella, who is of Cherokee descent, spent 14 years researching and creating his first map. But the project began years earlier when Carapella, now 35, was a teenager exploring his own heritage and looking for a map of tribes that he could hang on his bedroom wall.

“I never really found any good maps that were comprehensive in any way,” he said. “So I thought, why don’t I make my own? I bought four poster boards, taped them together and put on all the tribes that I knew.”

The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella got serious about his project when he realized so many Native people had never seen themselves represented on a map. He traveled to 250 Native communities and contacted every cultural department in North America, he said.

“I’ve used books, military records, settler documentation and autobiographies,” he said. “On road trips, I get off the highway and visit tribal communities. Everywhere I go, I’m talking to people.”

The result was the map of the United States, of which Carapella has already sold 3,200 copies and given away an additional 900. The maps are in classrooms, cultural centers and museums across the country. They’re also in homes, on bedroom walls and in researches’ offices.

A documentarian is making a film about Carapella’s project, and Hayden-McNeil, a textbook publishing company, is printing two of the maps in an upcoming book.

But Carapella decided not to stop with a map of the United States. He created additional maps showing locations of tribes—along with their traditional names—in Canada, Alaska, Mexico and Central America. He also offers a map of the entire North American continent identifying more than 1,000 tribes—and without the “artificial boundaries” established later.

“My next map is of South America,” Carapella said. “I don’t think I’m going to stop until I’ve done all the maps in the Western Hemisphere.”

The maps are already changing public perception in places like Olympia, Washington, where the map of the entire North American continent hangs on a wall at the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College. Program coordinator Karama Blackhorn said it serves as a conversation starter and a way to help indigenous students feel welcome.

Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

“The biggest problem minority students find is they don’t have a sense of belonging; they don’t see themselves in faculty, staff or other students,” she said. “There’s no Native representation on campus except anthropological. This is a giant, visual art piece that reminds people to stop having that historical mentality.”

Blackhorn, a member of the Kahosadi tribe of Oregon, said she grew up with a map that had only 12 tribes on it. Carapella’s map is the most comprehensive representation of Native America she’s ever seen.

“My family is on the map now,” she said. “This is validating on so many levels.”

In a classroom on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, history teacher William Stearns uses the maps to help students make connections to their own heritage.

“When you see students see these maps you can see the pride in them,” he said. “They stand taller, they understand. I believe that they have a clearer picture of their importance in this country.”

Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)
Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)

In an age where few places on the planet remain uncharted, cartography may seem an antiquated craft. But for Carapella, the project is an exploration not of geography, but rather history. In essence, he’s going back in time to capture a view of the land in its pre-colonial state.

For some, the maps are happy reminders of forgotten cultures. For others, they bring up difficult aspects of history or conflicted emotions. Any response, Carapella said, is evidence that he’s doing his job.

“It’s weird how many emotions get stirred up,” he said. “They are factual maps of where our nations were and what they were called, but they spark questions. They make people think in a different way.”

Carapella’s maps are available in various sizes and range in price from $49 to $300. Buy them online here.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/10/changing-perceptions-and-making-connections-one-map-time-159925

The UBC Equity Enhancement Fund. Due: April 1, 2016.

Posted on Updated on

EEF-banner-Van

2016 Equity Enhancement Fund

The Equity Enhancement Fund (EEF) supports community-based initiatives that enhance equity, diversity, inclusion and intercultural understanding at UBC. Proposals should demonstrate benefits to the representation or experiences of historically disadvantaged groups within the UBC community.

All academic or administrative units are invited to apply for funding. Student groups, as well as other faculty and staff groups, are invited to submit proposals through their respective leadership.

Applications are accepted for a broad range of funding up to a maximum of $25,000. Preference is given to proposals that demonstrate some matching financial contributions from partners and are for projects that have the potential to be self-sustaining. Separate funding is available for the Okanagan and Vancouver campus.

The deadline for submitting proposals is April 1, 2016. If you have any questions about the Equity Enhancement Fund, email equity@equity.ubc.ca.

Are you a student interested in applying for the fund?

Attend a student proposal writing session on March 2 or 3. See below for more info or register here.

Goals of the Equity Enhancement Fund

Following the action plan from Renewing our Commitment to Equity and Diversity: UBC’s Response to the Task Force Recommendations, preference will be given to initiatives which:

  • Build student, faculty and staff competencies and understanding related to issues of equity, diversity and inclusion through community-engaged activities.
  • Promote a respectful environment at UBC through education, dialogue and community engagement.

UBC equity and diversity committees

Equity and diversity committees from faculties, departments and units are encouraged to apply for Equity Enhancement Funding to develop or enhance equity in their work setting.

Read about previous Equity Enhancement Fund recipients


Proposal writing session for students

Students interested in applying for the Equity Enhancement Fund are encouraged to attend a proposal writing session on March 2 or 3. Equity and Inclusion Office educators and past fund recipients will be on hand to answer questions about writing proposals and will share examples of projects that have received funding.

This session is open for student applicants only. Please register for one of the following sessions. Light refreshments will be served.

Session 1
Wednesday, March 2
5pm to 6pm
BUCH D201, 1866 Main Mall
Facilitator: Rachael Sullivan
Deadline for registration March 1 – Register here
Session 2
Thursday, March 3
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Lillooet Room, I.K. Barber Learning Centre , #301-1961 East Mall
Facilitator: Rachael Sullivan
Deadline for registration March 1 – Register here

 


Guidelines

Read the proposal guidelines carefully to assist you in preparing a successful application. Download guidelines (pdf)

Who can apply for funding?

The following are invited to submit proposals to the Equity Enhancement Fund:

  • Any UBC academic or administrative unit
  • Equity committees and equity representatives
  • Unions or Associations
  • Alma Mater Society, UBC Students’ Union Okanagan
  • Graduate Student Society
  • Student clubs or groups
  • Individuals

Applications demonstrating partnerships with other clubs and units will be given preference.

NOTE: Proposals will not be accepted to fund academic research that would be carried out in the normal course of work or study or may be eligible for research funding.

Application Deadline

Download application form (word)

Application Form

Completed application forms (in word or pdf) should be emailed by April 1, 2016 to equity@equity.ubc.ca

Fund Objectives

  • Proposals should have observable and/or measurable benefits to the representation or experiences of historically disadvantaged groups within the UBC community.
  • Priority will be given to proposals that benefit the UBC community and have a continuing effect on enhancing employment or educational equity.
  • Proposals must provide clear rationale and objectives consistent with the University’s Equity and Inclusion mandate and commitments as outlined in Place and Promise
  • All Equity Enhancement Fund initiatives must be in accordance with UBC’s Respectful Environment Statement.

Endorsement

  • The proposal must be endorsed by a Head of Unit or the senior official of an organization ie. Alma Mater Society, Graduate Student Society and UBC Students’ Union Okanagan, union/association or student club. A Head of Unit is the Director of a service unit; Head of an academic department; Director of a centre, institute or school; Principal of a college; Dean; Associate Vice President; University Librarian; Registrar; Vice President; or President.
  • Submissions from the Unions or Associations must be endorsed and signed by the senior official of the organization.
  • Submissions from the AMS, GSS and UBCSUO must be endorsed and signed by the senior official of the organization.
  • NOTE: The person making the endorsement assumes responsibility for monitoring the project and ensuring a final report is submitted.

Reporting

  • Successful recipients are required to submit a report, including financial accounting, to the Associate Vice President, Equity and Inclusion upon completion of the project. The Equity and Inclusion Office will provide a template for this purpose.
  • Funds must be spent within one year of receiving funding. Any unused funds must be reported and returned.
  • The fund recipients are responsible for planning and implementation related to your project, and covering any cost overruns.

Funding Details

  • Proposals up to $25,000 will be considered. Small and large proposals are encouraged. Large proposals may receive partial funding.
  • Funding dispersed: 75% upon announcement and 25% on completion of final report.
  • There are separate funds for the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses.
  • Partnerships between faculties/units/departments/groups are encouraged.
  • Applications should demonstrate some financial contributions (not just in-kind) from faculties, units and clubs.
  • Funding will not be granted for projects that are a normal part of the unit’s responsibilities and operating expenses, or, except in exceptional circumstances, to reinstitute a previously funded project in a unit.
  • Funding is allocated once a year in the last quarter of the fiscal period by the Associate Vice-President, Equity and Inclusion, with advice from the Vice President Strategic Implementation Committee.
  • Fund amount and guidelines will be reviewed annually by the Associate Vice-President, Equity and Inclusion, and the Vice President Strategic Implementation Committee.

Evaluation Criteria

A sub-committee of the Vice President Strategic Implementation Committee with representatives from the Okanagan and Vancouver reviews and evaluates all applications. Their evaluation is based on the following criteria:

  • Strategic Value
    How well does this initiative align with the University’s Equity and Inclusion mandate and commitments as outlined in Place and Promise
  • Enhances Equity, Diversity and Inclusion
    Will this initiative significantly contribute to the enhancement of equity, inclusion, diversity and intercultural understanding at UBC?
  • Outreach
    Does this enhance UBC’s reputation on and off campus? Does it create an opportunity to partner with other UBC units/organizations or with groups outside the university?
  • Community Engaged Activities
    Will this project engage and inspire participation of historically disadvantaged groups within the UBC community?
  • Sustainability
    How can this project be made sustainable beyond the funding period?

Save the Date! Healing of the Canoe curriculum trainings

Posted on

Healing of the Canoe is a culturally grounded life skills curriculum for youth that has demonstrated effectiveness in preventing substance abuse, increasing a sense of hope/optimism/self efficacy, and strengthening youth connection to community and culture.

For more information about Healing of the Canoe and the trainings, please visit our website: http://healingofthecanoe.org

You can also contact any of us via email or phone for more information.  Please feel free to forward this to American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and organizations that you think might be interested.  If you forward this, please do cc me as we are tracking our outreach efforts; one of our goals is to disseminate widely.

Thank you so much!

screenshot_02