community-engagement

Indigenous Voices Unifying Central America: First Central American Indigenous Radio Conference to Take Place in Panama

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Indigenous Voices Unifying Central America: 
First Central American Indigenous Radio Conference to Take Place in Panama
From January 16-18, 2016 Cultural Survival, Fundación Comunicándonos, AMARC (Central American Sub region), Voces Indígenas Panamá, the General Guna Congress, Asociación Sobrevivencia Cultural and Indigenous community radio representatives will bring together representatives from Indigenous community radio stations in every country in Central America for the First Central American Indigenous Community Radio Conference: Indigenous Voices Unifying the Region. The event will spearhead a regional Indigenous community radio network for sharing resources, technologies, good practices, political strategies, and building international political support, all with the goal of supporting Indigenous Peoples’ struggle in defense of their identity, land, and human rights.

“We believe that this conference is an opportunity to come together as Indigenous Peoples and unify efforts to maintain our voice in the promotion of our cultures as a human right,” said Anselmo Xunic, Program Manager for Cultural Survival’s Community Media Program. Indigenous Peoples have a unique need for their community media, since it is through the media that they can communicate about issues that affect them, organize themselves, and strengthen their languages and cultures.

Community radio legislation in Central America is very limited. Throughout the region, both television and radio frequencies are monopolized by the commercial media, and the States in the region see communication not as a human right but as a commercial good, despite resolutions by UNESCO and the United Nations and the Organization of American States Special Rapporteurs on Freedom of Expression.
Many Indigenous community radio stations throughout Central America already function as members of networks, which has benefited their communities’efforts. In Guatemala, community radio stations have been working for over 16 years to pass a law that would give them a legal means of accessing radio frequencies, despite the fact that Guatemala’s constitution and Peace Accords require democratic access to radio frequencies. As they wait, Guatemala’s Indigenous community radio stations operate under the threat of raids, attacks, and closures by the police.
“Without freedom of expression, no other rights can be guaranteed. Indigenous Peoples demand radio frequencies to have their voices heard and to strengthen our languages, self-governance, information, and education. The Conference will serve to analyze these issues and collaborate to demand that the States in the region provide equal access to media, which is a human right, not a right of businesses,” said Cesar Gomez, Cultural Survival.
“This Conference provides motivation to share experiences and find strategies that make the right to freedom of expression more viable.  Putting our efforts together at the international level reverberates locally. It opens doors to women’s participation, both young and old,” said Rosy González, Indigenous Rights Radio Producer.
The First Central American Indigenous Community Radio Conference will take place January 16-18, 2016 in the Comarca Guna Yala in Panama with the participation of over 40 Indigenous leaders from the Kuna territory, Indigenous women and active members of community radios from throughout Central America. Half of the participants are women who demonstrate a strong commitment to the democratization of media for Indigenous Peoples and women, two sectors who have historically not been given sufficient voice in public media.
“The Conference will be a space for those of us who continue to work towards democratization of communication in the region to get to know each other better and to recognize the work that each is doing. It is a space to reflect on and share experiences and most importantly to continue weaving dreams and actions for an inclusive, just and democratic Central America. We come from every country in the region with the will to work, synergize, and most importantly spread the word on our fight against commercial media oligopolies,” said Oscar Pérez, Director of Fundación Comunicándonos.

The participants will develop a follow-up plan and draft an Outcome Document to record shared principles, conclusions, and follow-up.

Partners: Cultural Survival, Asociacion Sobrevivencia Cultural, Fundación Comunicándonos,  AMARC Central America, and Voces Indigenas Panama
Join us virtually:
  • Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.
  • Be a part of the conversation by using the hashtags #voicesindigenasCA #IndigenousvoicesCA
For more information on the Freedom of Expression and Community Radio in Central America, visit www.cs.org.
Contact: 
Angelica Rao:
 angelica@cs.org, +1-647-624-3084
Teresita Mendoza: teresita@culturalsurvival.org, 505-87734907 505-85285412 (en espanol)

CFP – Queer U 2016 Call for Submissions EXTENSION to Jan 3, 2016

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: Queer U 2016 “Claiming our Power, Claiming Ourselves: Healing our Communities Through (Un)Learning” – Jan 3, 2016

 

As part of Outweek (Feb 5-12), The Pride Collective is organizing Queer U, an annual academic conference on sexualities and genders. The conference centers on bringing the research and work of students and established scholars from across the west coast of north america and beyond to a broad audience in an attempt to foster understanding and discussion.

 

This year, the theme is “Claiming our Power, Claiming Ourselves: Healing our Communities Through (Un)Learning”. Our queerness is political and we are doing the work to undo cisheteronormative and homonormative narratives. This Outweek is organized with the intentions of strengthening our communities by recognizing the ways in which queer communities need to be actively working to do better, and how that is intricately related to the ways we heal, collectively and with ourselves. Please try to work this into your presentation, but any and all submissions will be considered.

 

This call for papers is open to undergraduate and graduate contributors and established scholars from any department or area of research that relates to sexuality and gender. Strong undergraduate submissions are also accepted. Workshop Proposals related to community are welcome as well. All topics are welcome; however Queer U is especially seeking submissions dealing with the following topics:

  • Queer & Trans* Healing
  • Critiques of Homonormativity
  • Relationships between Community & Wellness
  • Intersections of Queer/Trans* Communities with Systems of Power
  • Anti-racist, Indigenous, and/or Intersectional Feminist Approaches are Encouraged!

 

If interested, send in a short (300 word or less) abstract outlining the paper, presentation, and/or workshop to prideubc@gmail.com no later than January 3rd, 2016. Please title email Queer U abstract.

 

The Queer U Conference is open to the general public. It will take place on Saturday, February 6th from 11am to 5pm.

Community Feast Bowl at FIrst Nations Longhouse, Nov. 25, 2015

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Wednesday, November 25: Community Feast Bowl

Join the Indigenous Health Garden for the monthly Community Feast Bowl Lunch, serving traditional and in-season foods. Volunteers are needed to help prepare food. Meet in the Longhouse kitchen any time after 9:30 AM to help cook. If you are new to the Feast Bowl, visit the volunteer website and let the organizers know you are coming or contact Hannah Lewis, including for more information.Wednesday, November 25, 9:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

Lunch will be served at 12:30 PM in Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall. The meal is free and everyone is welcome.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, November 16, 2015

Job – Assistant Professor (tenure track), Indigenous Studies, University of Sudbury. Dec. 1, 2015

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies

The University of Sudbury, a bilingual and tri-cultural institution and founding member of the Laurentian Federation, invites applications for a tenure-stream position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies commencing July 1, 2016. The Department of Indigenous Studies seeks a dynamic candidate with an expertise in the areas of: health and wellness, community-based research, Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous spirituality. Applicants should have a PhD, or ABD in Indigenous Studies or related discipline and have a demonstrated ability for excellence in research, teaching, publications and working with Indigenous communities. Experience in teaching and Indigenous research and knowledge of an Indigenous language and/or French will be considered definite assets.

Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching dossier and three separate confidential reference letters directed to: Dr. Pierre Zundel, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Sudbury, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6. The deadline for applications is December 1, 2015 but applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

This announcement is directed primarily but not exclusively to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada. The University of Sudbury encourages applications from all qualified individuals, including women, members of visible and ethnic minorities, Indigenous peoples, and persons with disabilities.

 

Summer Symposium on trends in higher education, University of Regina, July 23-25, 2015

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Public Engagement and the Politics of Evidence in an Age of Neoliberalism and Audit Culture” July 23-25, 2015, University of Regina.  
This symposium will examine accelerating trends in higher education: neoliberalism, the politics of evidence, and the audit culture. In an age in which value is often equated with accountancy, we will examine the place in the academy for public intellectualism, community-engagement, Indigenous epistemologies, and how the impact of our scholarship is, and ought to be, justly assessed. 
  
Questions to be explored include:  
   
What counts as scholarship and why?  
How do we achieve accountability in an age of accountancy?  
How do we measure research impact, (i.e., journal impact factor vs community and policy impact)?  
Impact for whom?  
Who and how do we determine whose evidence and what research is legitimate?  
What can be done? How do we effect change to university practices?  
  
Confirmed speakers include:  
Dr. Marie Battiste, Dr. Nick Carleton, Dr. Norman Denzin, Dr. Michelle Fine, Dr. Chad Gaffield, Dr. Sandy Grande, Dr. Rosalind Gill, Dr. Budd Hall, Dr. Yvonna Lincoln, Dr. Matthew McKean, Dr. Marcia McKenzie, Dr. Peter McLaren, Dr. Christopher Meyers, Dr. Leigh Patel, Dr. Andrea Smith, Dr. Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Dr. Robina Thomas, Dr. Eve Tuck, and, Dr. Joel Westheimer; 
  
Please visit the symposium website at: