critical ethnic studies

Job – Director, Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies – Faculty of Arts

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The Faculty of Arts at The University of British Columbia – Vancouver campus invites applications from experienced scholars and academic leaders for the position of Director of the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (CIS), with an anticipated start date of July 1, 2018. The University is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territories of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people, with whom UBC shares a framework Memorandum of Affiliation. The Institute is committed to critical decolonial social change and theoretical advancement, research excellence, community engagement, land-based learning, and international impact. Information about the Institute and each of its constituent programs— First Nations and Indigenous Studies (FNIS) and First Nations and Endangered Languages (FNEL)—is available on their respective websites: http://fnis.arts.ubc.ca/ and http://fnel.arts.ubc.ca/.

 

The Directorship appointment is expected to be for a five-year term, with the possibility for reappointment. There is potential for cross-appointment with other academic units, but primary teaching and service responsibilities will be within the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies.

 

We seek applicants who have a Ph.D., a distinguished record of research publications commensurate with appointment at the Associate Professor rank or higher, a demonstrated record of high quality undergraduate and graduate teaching, a track record of successful graduate supervision, a background in establishing and maintaining trusting relationships with Indigenous communities and organizations, and the necessary skills and experience that demonstrate capacity for leadership in an academic setting.  Prior administrative experience in a leadership role will be an asset. We encourage applicants with a demonstrated commitment to advancing areas of research currently represented in the Institute.

 

Engagement with Indigenous communities and organizations is central to the work of the Institute, and we seek candidates who understand the importance of relationship building to their work as leaders. The successful applicant will be a creative, effective, and collaborative leader who fosters an environment of respectful inclusion for students, staff, faculty, and community partners. The Institute Director’s responsibilities will include recruiting and evaluating faculty, developing Institute-wide and University-wide initiatives, maintaining and enhancing respectful partnerships with our Musqueam hosts, overseeing the educational and community programs and the financial health of the unit.

 

This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

 

Applications should be sent in a single PDF to Laura J. Hart (Manager – Admin & HR, Dean of Arts Office) via email (Arts.Headships@ubc.ca) with the following components: a letter of application; a curriculum vitae; evidence of teaching effectiveness; and 5 statements (no longer than 1 page each) summarizing their (a) research program, (b) experience in respectful and community-centred administrative leadership, (c) teaching philosophy/practice and ability to work with a diverse student body committed to decolonization, (d) Indigenous community engagement, and (e) potential contributions to the Institute.

 

Review of applications will begin on October 2, 2017, and will continue until the position is filled. We thank all who express interest in this position, however, only those applicants who are longlisted will be contacted further.

 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

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Truth Before Reconciliation: Reframing/Resisting/Refusing Reconciliation. 6-8pm, March 10, 2017

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Truth Before Reconciliation: Reframing/Resisting/Refusing Reconciliation March 10th, 2017

 

  • While much academic and public discourse since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) final report has and continues to emphasize reconciliation, there is also deep skepticism about a process of reconciling that so readily glosses over truth-telling. Centering the truth as it relates to the TRC is essential to any meaningful processes of reconciliation in Canada. The inspiration for focusing on truth in this context comes from Dr. Sarah Hunt’s response to Senator Murray Sinclair at an event hosted at Green College at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in March 2016. Dr. Hunt is Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) and Assistant Professor of Critical Indigenous Geographies and First Nations and Indigenous Studies at UBC.

 

Speakers: Patricia M. Barkaskas and Sarah Hunt and the event will take place on Friday March 10th from 6-8pm in room 1900 at the SFU Harbour Centre. This event is free but registration is required. The registration portal will open on February 24th.

Critical Ethnic Studies Summer Institute

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OVERVIEW:

Critical ethnic studies is an approach to scholarship, institution-building, and activism animated by the spirit of the decolonial, antiracist, and other global liberationist movements that enabled the creation of ethnic studies and continues to inform its political and intellectual projects. It seeks to move away from current critical deadlocks, to counteract institutional marginalization, to revisit the political ideas that precipitated ethnic studies’ founding within the US academy, and to create new conversations in multiple locations.

But as critical ethnic studies has emerged in a variety of ways, the question remains: what exactly is critical ethnic studies? Does it imply that ethnic studies was not already “critical”? What is its relationship to the historic emergence of ethnic studies in the academy and activist circles? As the academic industrial complex has increasingly marginalized and coopted critical interdisciplinary studies such as ethnic studies, gender studies, queer studies, etc., what kinds of works can critical ethnic studies do across academic institutions, community organizing, and advocacy efforts? And insofar as critical ethnic studies claims itself as both a political and intellectual project, what is its relationship to broad social justice-based movements? What are the legacies of ethnic studies outside the United States, and how might a critical approach reconsider its genealogies and forms of solidarity? And what might be the limitations of any approach to analyzing and challenging settler colonialism, white supremacy, antiblackness, imperialism, capitalism, and heteropatriarchy, when organized through ethnicity? Finally, how might different approaches to critical ethnic studies – long existing and still emerging – be brought into conversation with each other?

In this Summer Institute, we will explore collectively the question “What is critical ethnic studies?” Over three days of intensive seminars, open conversations, and informal exchanges, we will explore the possibilities and pitfalls of a critical ethnic studies framework.  All are welcome to apply.

https://criticalethnicstudies.org/content/summer-institute  for more information and application materials