cultural revitalization

Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation, Pre-symposium and Symposium events – March 15-18, 2017.

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Pre-Symposium Event: Landsdowne Lecture with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

March 15th 5:00 pm, First Peoples House, Ceremonial Hall

Hosted by the Department of Political Science

Freedom Sings: Land/Bodies/Resurgence

This talk will explore Indigenous resurgence and nationhood through story, song and video. Leanne will discuss resurgence as an ongoing intervention into the colonial project by sharing works from her recent album f(l)ight (RPM Records), her new book of short stories This Accident of Being Lost (House of Anansi) and her forthcoming academic work on the The Radical Resurgence Project (UMP Press). More information about Leanne Simpson.

See poster

Symposium: Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation March 15-18, 2017

  • This symposium will bring together many prominent Indigenous scholars in the fields of Political Science, Law and Indigenous Governance to consider the long intellectual tradition of Indigenous resurgence within these fields while looking toward new directions in consideration of the challenges and possibilities produced in the era of reconciliation. The aim in hosting this event is to cultivate an environment for productive discussion of a central concern facing Indigenous resurgence: our relationships with creation (land, water, animals, ancestors) and how these relationships have been impacted by reconciliation politics.

Speakers: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, Dian Million, Sheryl Lightfoot, Christine O’Bonsawin, Taiaiake Alfred, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Hunt, Aimee Craft, Audra Simpson, Hayden King, Nick Claxton, Hokulani Aikau, Daniel Heath Justice. This event will take place at the University of Victoria at the First Peoples House from March 15th to 18th 2017. No registration is required, and the event is free.

More info…

 

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Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film

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Ten inspiring animated shorts from 2016

December 29, 2016

With films like Pocahontas, Apocalypto, Peter Pan and The Green Inferno, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has a deplorable track record when it comes to its portrayal of Indigenous Peoples. Perhaps it’s to be expected given that films tend to be produced through a Eurocentric lens. Even when production companies try to get it right, they still somehow manage to fail–such as the case with Disney’s Moana.

It makes us all the more grateful that Hollywood has lost its monopoly on film. New Independent film makers are constantly emerging to give us something genuine, heartfelt and inspired to watch with family and friends.

This year was particularly exciting for indigenous film. Among the hundreds–if not, thousands–of feature films, documentaries and television shows that indigenous filmmakers made in 2016, indigenous nations started releasing their own independently-produced films to tell their own stories in their own words and languages.

We also saw a sturdy wave of truly inspiring animated shorts that celebrate indigenous culture, breathing new life into the incredibly rich and equally important tradition of storytelling.

We loved these animated shorts so much we just had to share them with you. Read more…

 

Source: Schertow, John Ahni. January 18, 2017. Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film. Retrieved from:  https://intercontinentalcry.org/celebrating-indigenous-culture-animated-film/

Daryl Baldwin: toopeeliyankwi, kati myaamiaataweeyankwi: We Succeed At Speaking The Myaamia Language. 11:30am-1pm, Feb 22, 2016

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Abstract

The Myaamia language was labeled an extinct language by the mid 20th century. After 25 years of reconstruction and revitalization, the Myaamia language is spoken once again among a younger generation of tribal youth who are using language learning opportunities to reconnect to each other and their Indigenous knowledge system. It is through the creation of a holistic well-designed educational effort that cultural knowledge and language proficiency will increase over time. This talk will explore the strategies employed by the Myaamia community in their attempts to rebuild community through language and cultural education.

Daryl Baldwin, Director, Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Myaamia Center is a unique collaborative effort supported by the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University in Oxford, Ohio for the purpose of advancing the language and cultural needs of the Myaamia people. Daryl received an MA in linguistics from the University of Montana. He has worked with the Myaamia people developing language and cultural materials since 1995. For an update on the projects currently under development through the Myaamia Center please visit the web site at www.myaamiacenter.org.

Location & Timing

11:30-1:00pm, Monday, February 22, 2016
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, First Nations Longhouse
1985 West Mall

Baldwin’s lecture will begin at 11:30am. A free catered lunch will follow his talk at 1pm. The lecture will be held in the Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall at the First Nations Longhouse, 1985 West Mall.

For the event poster, click here.