decolonization

Assistant Professor (Tenure-Track) Social Work, Catholic University of America.

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The Catholic University of America National Catholic School of Social Service Washington, DCAssistant Professor (Tenure-Track)

Derived from the mission of The Catholic University of America and values of the social work profession, the m i s s i o n o f t h e National Catholic School of Social Service (NCSSS) is to educate students from diverse faiths and cultures who, in their professional endeavors, embody the values of social justice, service, and scholarship. This mission is grounded in the justice and charity foundation of Catholic social teachings and the tradition of a modern university that welcomes all forms of human inquiry.

In 1918, the National Catholic School of Social Service was founded by the Catholic Church in the United States to provide a Catholic response to social problems in society. The doctoral program, established in 1934, is the third oldest social work doctoral program in the world. NCSSS , fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, a l s o provides a master’s degree in social work, and bachelor’s degree in social work.

Today, NCSSS is ranked by the US News and World Report in the top 50 schools of social work. Further, the School is proud to be ranked the #1 Catholic and #2 Christian school of social work in the world. The school’s online MSW program is ranked #4. Clearly, excellence in scholarship, education, and service by NCSSS faculty is a hallmark of the school.

We seek candidates who understand, are enthusiastic about, and will make a significant contribution to the mission of the University, which reads as follows:

“As the national university of the Catholic Church in the United States, founded and sponsored by the bishops of the country with the approval of the Holy See, The Catholic University of America is committed to being a comprehensive Catholic and American institution of higher learning, faithful to the teachings of Jesus Christ as handed on by the Church. Dedicated to advancing the dialogue between faith and reason, The Catholic University of America seeks to discover and impart the truth through excellence in teaching and research, all in service to the Church, the nation and the world.”

Essential Duties: (1) Teach clinical social work practice courses in the BSW and MSW programs, including advanced theory courses. (2) Actively participate in one of the NCSSS research centers and collaborate in the development of research projects and grants; (3) Serve as a mentor and advisor to students; (4) Serve on school and university committees; and (5) Perform other duties as assigned.

Qualifications: MSW and PhD in Social Work, with eligibility for licensure as an LCSW, and evidence of successful teaching experience in a social work program. Strong understanding of Catholic Social Teaching and the Catholic Moral Tradition.

Mission Statement. The Catholic University of America is the national university of the Catholic Church and was founded as a center of research and scholarship. We seek candidates who will make a significant contribution to the mission and goals of the University and NCSSS.

Applicants are urged to review the University Mission Statement on our website: http://www.cua.edu/about-cua/mission-statement.cfm. Candidates will be expected to provide a written statement to Dean Rainford reflecting how their academic and professional goals fit with the mission of the university and the school, with specific attention to the University mission statement.

The National Catholic School of Social Service has a longstanding commitment to enhancing diversity, therefore we strongly encourage applications from people from underrepresented groups.

Applicant finalists who are being considered for employment will be asked to submit to a criminal background check.

All interested and qualified candidates, please submit a CUA Application for Employment, cover letter, curriculum vitae, and the names and telephone numbers of three professional references to: Dean Will C. Rainford, The Catholic University of America, NCSSS, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064. You may also apply by e-mail to: rainford@cua.edu. Reviewof applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.

Posting (PDF): 2016-17 job post
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Call for Submissions – Decolonizing Conference at OISE/U of T. Due: June 30, 2016

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CIARS 2016 “DECOLONIZING CONFERENCE”

SAVE THE DATE: November 3-5th, 2016


SUBMISSION
DEADLINE: June 30, 2016

 

The Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies (CIARS) invites submissions for the 2016 “Decolonizing Conference”. The Decolonizing Conference is taking place at OISE/U of T from November 3-5th, 2016, with a pre-conference happening Nov. 2. We invite participation from Faculty, Graduate Students, Undergraduate Students, Artists, and Activists to engage the central theme of the conference, and we offer a wide range of submission categories.
Conference Theme | “Race, Anti-Racism and Indigeneity: Anti-Colonial Resurgence and Decolonial Resistance” 

Speakers | Keynotes Taiaiake Alfred, Joyce E. King, Walter D. Mignolo
Featured Speakers (and more!) |
Haydon King, Jose Aylwin, Andrea Davis, Sandy Grande, Afua Cooper, Carl James, Njoki Wane, Peter McLaren, Lee Maracle, Sherene Razack, Eve Tuck

Submission Categories

1. Individual papers

2. Individual posters

3. Group poster sessions

4. Group panel sessions

5. Workshops (aimed at enhancing Undergraduate/Graduate Student learning)

6. Other Critical Contributions: Arts-based Installations and Other New Media (Poetry, Songs, Dance, audio-based media such as podcasts, Visual media such as Film)


Share with Your Networks!


Like the Decolonizing Conference FB Page
Join the Decolonizing Conference FB Event Page

Visit the website: http://www.decolonizingconference.com/

Download
the PDF of the Full Call for Abstracts online: http://www.decolonizingconference.com/call-for-abstracts(attached)

Register
online: $50 Faculty and $25 Students

+ Decolonizing Conference Poster  (attached)

+ Call for Submissions (attached)

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

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Aaron Carapella Son Sequoyah
Courtesy Brian McDermott
“Map guy” Aaron Carapella is pictured here with his son, Sequoyah.

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

4/10/15

In the beginning, there were no lines.

Prior to 1492, North America was a vast wilderness: an expanse of rolling hills, open plains and meandering rivers. There were no state boundaries, no borders between countries and no private property.

That’s what Aaron Carapella captures in his Tribal Nations Maps, the only known maps that show what Turtle Island looked like before European contact.

“There are a lot of horrible maps out there that stereotype Native Americans or provide misinformation,” said Carapella, who lives in Stigler, Oklahoma. “We need something to combat that. We need maps that aren’t divided by modern countries and political borders, that show where tribes were and what they were called.”

The original Tribal Nations Map, released in 2012, is a poster-sized replica of the United States, minus the state lines. Roughly 590 Native nations are spread across the map, identified by their indigenous names, traditional locations and, when possible, historic images.

Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella, who is of Cherokee descent, spent 14 years researching and creating his first map. But the project began years earlier when Carapella, now 35, was a teenager exploring his own heritage and looking for a map of tribes that he could hang on his bedroom wall.

“I never really found any good maps that were comprehensive in any way,” he said. “So I thought, why don’t I make my own? I bought four poster boards, taped them together and put on all the tribes that I knew.”

The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella got serious about his project when he realized so many Native people had never seen themselves represented on a map. He traveled to 250 Native communities and contacted every cultural department in North America, he said.

“I’ve used books, military records, settler documentation and autobiographies,” he said. “On road trips, I get off the highway and visit tribal communities. Everywhere I go, I’m talking to people.”

The result was the map of the United States, of which Carapella has already sold 3,200 copies and given away an additional 900. The maps are in classrooms, cultural centers and museums across the country. They’re also in homes, on bedroom walls and in researches’ offices.

A documentarian is making a film about Carapella’s project, and Hayden-McNeil, a textbook publishing company, is printing two of the maps in an upcoming book.

But Carapella decided not to stop with a map of the United States. He created additional maps showing locations of tribes—along with their traditional names—in Canada, Alaska, Mexico and Central America. He also offers a map of the entire North American continent identifying more than 1,000 tribes—and without the “artificial boundaries” established later.

“My next map is of South America,” Carapella said. “I don’t think I’m going to stop until I’ve done all the maps in the Western Hemisphere.”

The maps are already changing public perception in places like Olympia, Washington, where the map of the entire North American continent hangs on a wall at the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College. Program coordinator Karama Blackhorn said it serves as a conversation starter and a way to help indigenous students feel welcome.

Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

“The biggest problem minority students find is they don’t have a sense of belonging; they don’t see themselves in faculty, staff or other students,” she said. “There’s no Native representation on campus except anthropological. This is a giant, visual art piece that reminds people to stop having that historical mentality.”

Blackhorn, a member of the Kahosadi tribe of Oregon, said she grew up with a map that had only 12 tribes on it. Carapella’s map is the most comprehensive representation of Native America she’s ever seen.

“My family is on the map now,” she said. “This is validating on so many levels.”

In a classroom on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, history teacher William Stearns uses the maps to help students make connections to their own heritage.

“When you see students see these maps you can see the pride in them,” he said. “They stand taller, they understand. I believe that they have a clearer picture of their importance in this country.”

Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)
Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)

In an age where few places on the planet remain uncharted, cartography may seem an antiquated craft. But for Carapella, the project is an exploration not of geography, but rather history. In essence, he’s going back in time to capture a view of the land in its pre-colonial state.

For some, the maps are happy reminders of forgotten cultures. For others, they bring up difficult aspects of history or conflicted emotions. Any response, Carapella said, is evidence that he’s doing his job.

“It’s weird how many emotions get stirred up,” he said. “They are factual maps of where our nations were and what they were called, but they spark questions. They make people think in a different way.”

Carapella’s maps are available in various sizes and range in price from $49 to $300. Buy them online here.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/10/changing-perceptions-and-making-connections-one-map-time-159925

A Conversation with Dr. Kim TallBear: An Indigenous Ethic of Relationality

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Kim TallBear’s forthcoming book, Disrupting Settlement, Sex and Nature: An Indigenous Logic, offers an alternative framework to such settlements and binaries—that of purposeful, responsible migration and boundary crossing (which can also be viewed as a form of critical and mindful promiscuity), or routedness through place, knowledge/disciplines, and intimate relations with both humans and landscapes. The concept of relations—rather than nature or sex—is central. This ethic of relationality will be the central point of this conversation.

Tuesday, February 23, 4 – 5:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

RSVP via email to fnis.arts@ubc.ca by 4 PM, February 19. Indicate any food allergies in your RSVP.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 15, 2016

Anishinaabe cook uses language to teach about traditional food

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By Waubgeshig Rice, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 4:28 PM ET

dan-kimewonDan Kimewon uses Anishinaabemowin to teach cooking and healthy living.

Diabetes epidemic among indigenous Canadians, say front-line workers
Culture night hits home at Ottawa’s Wabano Centre
An Anishinaabe cook is using his indigenous language and knowledge of traditional foods to teach people about culture and healthy eating at the Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Dan Kimewon, from Saugeen First Nation in southern Ontario, is in Ottawa this weekend to talk Anishinaabemowin (also known as the Ojibway language) with community members, lead cooking classes, and share his experiences of growing up with traditional Anishinaabe teachings about growing and preparing food.

Wabano
The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health’s community kitchen is a weekly event. (Waubgeshig Rice/CBC News)

“I’m here to teach about a healthy way of life, and how to cook in a healthy way,” said Kimewon, following a lesson with the Wabano diabetes program’s community kitchen, where people learn how to make healthy food options to manage diabetes.

He encourages people to move away from diets of processed and fast foods in hopes of curbing high rates of diabetes and obesity among indigenous people.

“We’ve got so many native people that are sick from this, and we’ve got to understand that,” he said.

Instead, he wants people to embrace more traditional indigenous foods like corn, also known as “mandamin” in Anishinaabemowin. He demonstrates how to prepare corn for soup and other meals in his presentations.

“[Corn] is a way of life of our people,” he said. “It never came from overseas. It’s from here. We’ve always had it.” Read More…

Call for Chapter Proposals – Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education. Due: Apr 1, 2016

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Call for Chapter Proposals: Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education

Priority deadline for 300-word abstracts: April 1, 2016

Edited by Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Eve Tuck, & K. Wayne Yang

This book will be published in a brand new series by Routledge, on Indigenous and Decolonizing Studies in Education, co-edited by Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang. For more information on the series, go to http://www.evetuck.com/idse-book-series/

This edited volume will feature original chapters which help define and imagine the exciting interstices between Indigenous and decolonizing studies and education. As one of the early volumes of a new series, it will provide a dynamic narrative of the emergence of Indigenous and decolonizing studies in education as a field, and also serve as launch pad for future conversations.  The book builds upon the proliferation of scholarship since co-editor, Linda Tuhiwai Smith’s foundational book, Decolonizing Methodologies was first published in 1999. Participating authors will include those at the forefront of theorizing, practice, research, and activism in Indigenous and decolonizing studies in education.

The increased attention given to Indigenous and decolonizing studies comes with problems and possibilities, as evidenced by the problematic ways in which “decolonization” has been used metaphorically for diverse social justice efforts (Tuck & Yang, 2012), and the possibilities created by educators who have resisted that metaphorization by articulating the challenges of solidarity across power and difference. Nonetheless, the very uptake of decolonization as both an analytic and as a desired future (Mignolo, 2012) within education, and the attention to Indigenous studies that necessarily comes with it, has led to exciting new directions in thinking.

To submit an abstract, please send a Word document with the following information to evetuck@gmail.com and kwayne@ucsd.edu by April 1, 2016

A proposed chapter title, and 300 word abstract (APA format).

Names, affiliations and contact emails for proposed authors. For co-authored submissions, please designate an author for correspondence. If you are a member of an Indigenous community, please include Nation or Indigenous community name.

A brief narrative addressing the following:

    1. How will your chapter address the productive edges and overlaps between Indigenous and decolonizing and education studies?
    2. What theme (below) would be the best match for your proposed chapter?

Information for Authors

This edited volume attends to the productive edges and overlaps between Indigenous and decolonizing and education studies. It contours a foundational framework for scholars, educators, and cultural workers interested in furthering the commute of ideas across these edgy intersections.

We invite chapter proposals that addressing topics along the following themes:

Decolonizing place and land education.  Describing Indigenous and decolonizing interventions on understandings of place in education and place-based education.

Decolonizing educational social movements.  Rethinking rights-based claims and imperatives to education as – i.e., education as a civil right or as a human right – from the perspective of Indigenous social justice.

Decolonization and Black optimism (Moten, 2014).  Interfacing decolonial thinking vis-a-vis the various turns in Black thought, (e.g. Caribbean decolonial thought, Black marxism, Black feminist thought, African postcolonial literature, Black studies analyses of slavery and neoslavery, Afropessimism, queer of color critique, and the examinations of antiblackness and Black liberation across diverse contexts throughout Europe, Asia, Latin America, etc.) and the impact on education studies. Includes a robust conversation exploring the intersections between antiblackness and settler colonialism.

Decolonizing diasporic education. Examining the tensions between critical studies in education that center diaspora and Indigenous critiques of settler colonialism. Whereas migrations of diasporic people are often driven by militarism, transnational capitalism, and empire, they often migrate onto Indigenous lands. Therefore, efforts to articulate decolonizing education for diaspora must begin with a “by asking the central question not only where do people of the diaspora come from, but where have they come to?” (Haig-Brown, 2009, p.5).

Decolonizing borderlands education. Reimagining the borders of the nation state and implications for education. Analyses of the material and symbolic shape and location of borders, the construction of border-crossers as criminal, the impacts of borders on Indigenous peoples, and new theorizations of separate sovereignties on shared territories.

Decolonizing gender and sexuality in education. Unsettling the normative frameworks of “settler sexuality” (Morgenson, 2010) in education. Analyses of the colonial underpinnings of categories of gender and sexuality. Indigenous and decolonizing reimaginings of gender and sexuality.

Decolonizing educational policy. Conceptualizing educational and social policies which seek to redistribute land and resources so that schooling takes on new meaning and possibilities.

Decolonizing futurities.  Setting forth a new set of purposes for schooling and education, purposes aligned with Indigenous educational models (Lomawaima & McCarty, 2006). Considers the impacts of Indigenous theorizations of the future for education studies.

Not all proposals will fit neatly into these themes, and some topics may not appear to be foregrounded in these themes. We encourage authors to consider how their topics can deepen and complicate the discussion within any of these themes. For example, critical examinations on race and disability would be welcome in any of themes outlined above.

This edited volume aims to energize scholarly discussions of Indigenous and decolonizing studies in education in order to prompt contingent collaborations, ethical coalitions, and decolonized theories of change.

Works cited

Haig-Brown, C. (2009). Decolonizing Diaspora: Whose Traditional Land are We On? Cultural and Pedagogical Inquiry, 1(1), 4-21.

Lomawaima, K. T., & McCarty, T. L. (2006). ” To Remain an Indian”: Lessons in Democracy from a Century of Native American Education (pp. 2-3). New York: Teachers College Press.

Mignolo, W. (2012). Decolonizing Western epistemology / building decolonial epistemologies. In A. M. Isasi-Díaz, & E. Mendieta, E. (Eds.), Decolonizing epistemologies: Latina/o theology and philosophy, pp. 19-43. New York: Fordham University Press.

Morgensen, S. (2010). Settler Homonationalism: Theorizing Settler Colonialism within Queer Modernities. Glq: a Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 16, 105-131.

Moten, F. (2013). Blackness and Nothingness (Mysticism in the Flesh). South Atlantic Quarterly, 112(4), 737–780.

Smith, L. T. (1999/2012). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. London, UK: Zed Books.

Tuck, E. & Yang, K.W. (2012). Decolonization is not a metaphor. Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society, 1(1), 1-40.

Jan 22-24, 2016: STAND Conference – Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

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Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

About the Conference

In light of the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report published in June 2015 regarding the cultural genocide of First Nations peoples, STAND is looking to reorient itself toward domestic issues related to genocide in addition to our international advocacy focus. This conference will convene STAND Canada’s national leadership on the UBC campus, hosted by our UBC Chapter, for a robust dialogue on STAND’s future in relation to genocide on this land that will engage multiple stakeholders.

The objectives for this conference are open-ended as we listen through consultations, meetings, and events in an effort to understand our responsibility as a Canadian anti-genocide advocacy organization. As a result of the topic of focus, we are excited to build relationships with external allies and local Indigenous groups that may be interested in teaching us and working with us.

For more information, please view our Conference Summary.

Get Involved with the Conference

The Conference will be held from 9am – 8pm in Vancouver on January 22, 23, and from 9am – 2pm on January 24. There is no cost for attending the Conference.

We have organized two events open to the public. Please join us for the following events:

If you are interested in attending but do not have a Facebook account or you are bringing a guest, please email us or RSVP through Eventbrite to the film screening and Open Forum. We would like to ensure that our events meet room capacity numbers.

For any questions, please email us.