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decolonization

Iceland to build first temple to Norse gods in 1,000 years

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Iceland to build first temple to Norse gods in 1,000 years

 

World | Tue Feb 3, 2015

Icelanders will soon be able to publicly worship at a shrine to Thor, Odin and Frigg with construction starting this month on the island’s first major temple to the Norse gods since the Viking age.

Worship of the gods in Scandinavia gave way to Christianity around 1,000 years ago but a modern version of Norse paganism has been gaining popularity in Iceland.

“I don’t believe anyone believes in a one-eyed man who is riding about on a horse with eight feet,” said Hilmar Orn Hilmarsson, high priest of ‘Asatruarfelagid’, an association that promotes faith in the Norse gods.

“We see the stories as poetic metaphors and a manifestation of the forces of nature and human psychology.”

Membership in Asatruarfelagid has tripled in Iceland in the last decade to 2,400 members last year, out of a total population of 330,000, data from Statistics Iceland showed. Read more…

 

New Issue in Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society

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Dear friends,

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society has just published its
latest issue at http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/issue/view/1618.

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web
site to review and read articles and items of interest.

We’re thrilled to continue to publish as an open access journal and
appreciate your ongoing support in sharing this work as widely as possible
through your networks!

In peace,

Eric Ritskes
Editor

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society
Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Table of Contents
http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/issue/view/1618

Cover Art
——–

Artist’s statement: What decolonization means to me
Kalkidan Assefa

Articles
——–

Indigenous girls and the violence of settler colonial policing
Jaskiran K. Dhillon
Refusal to forgive: Indigenous women’s love and rage
Rachel Flowers
Teaching Indigenous methodology and an Iñupiaq example
Maureen P. Hogan,       Sean A. Topkok
Beyond the colonial divide: African diasporic and Indigenous youth alliance
building for HIV prevention
Ciann L. Wilson,        Sarah Flicker,  Jean-Paul Restoule
Tensional decolonization and public order in Western Nigeria, 1957-1960
Oluwatoyin Oduntan,     Kemi Rotimi
Reviews
——–

A review of Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Research Methodology
Elaine Coburn
Indigenous temporal priority and the (de)legitimization of the Canadian
state: A book review of On Being Here to Stay
Scott Kouri

________________________________________________________________________
Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society
www.decolonization.org

CFP – Storying Solidarities: Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts, University of Calgary. Due: Feb 1, 2016

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Storying Solidarities:
Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts

A Gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association
May 28th-29th, 2016
Academic Congress, The University of Calgary, Treaty 7 Territory

In the Traditional Lands of the Blackfoot Confederacy Calgary, Alberta, Canada

For its second annual gathering, and the first time at Academic Congress, the Indigenous Literary Studies Association seeks to think together about the sometimes conflicted relationship between alliance and autonomy in decolonial struggles as imagined, illustrated, and interrogated through Indigenous literary arts. While terms like “solidarity” and “alliance” tend to be valued as inherently positive, their often vague and uncritical application risks masking and thereby sustaining settler colonial power in ways that might threaten Indigenous autonomy and self-determination.

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to explore the tensions that persist between the generative possibilities of consensual alliance and the ongoing urgency for what Métis artist and scholar David Garneau calls “irreconcilable spaces of Aboriginality”: “gatherings, ceremony, Cree-only discussions, kitchen-table conversations, email exchanges, etc. in which Blackfootness, Métisness, Indianness, Aboriginality, and/or Indigeneity is performed apart from a Settler audience” (33). In particular, we invite participants to consider the ways in which Indigenous literary arts provide tools for imagining and enacting solidarities with genuinely decolonizing potential, while laying bare the ethical dimensions such solidarities demand.

We welcome participants to consider alliance in its multiple and expansive dimensions — among Indigenous nations, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, between Indigenous scholars and the communities with which they identify, between Indigenous decolonization movements and other social justice movements, and between Indigenous literary studies and Indigenous Studies more broadly. We also welcome participants to conceive of literary arts expansively; we welcome discussions of literature, film, theatre, storytelling, song, hip-hop, and other forms of narrative expression.

Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, including at least 15 minutes for collaborative dialogue. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with any of the following topics:

  • Autonomy and Alliance in Treaty 7 Territory
  • Confederacy, Intertribal Alliance, and the Literary Arts
  • The Terrain of “Solidarity” in Community-Based Participatory Research
  • What David Garneau calls “Irreconcilable Spaces of Aboriginality”
  • What Leanne Simpson calls “Sovereign Sites of Intimacy”
  • Activist Alliances among Indigenous and Diasporic Artists
  • Kinship and Alliance with the Other-than-Human
  • Art, Autonomy, and Idlenomore
  • Literary Methods and Narrative Arts as Praxis
  • Orality and Solidarity Building
  • Collaborative Creation and Multi-Media
  • Artistic Expressions of Sovereignty and Self-Determination
  • Land-based Solidarities and the Literary Arts
  • Intimacy and Erotics as Expressions of AllianceStorying Solidarities features keynote speakers Eldon Yellowhorn (confirmed) & Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (unconfirmed). The gathering also features the Renate Eigenbrod Memorial Mentorship Lunch, which will connect emerging artists and scholars with established mentors; both mentors and mentees can register for the event by contacting Deanna Reder at dhr@sfu.ca. In collaboration with the Canadian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Languages Studies, this year’s “Aboriginal Roundtable” will bring together artists, activists, and academics who will engage the theme: “Decolonial Solidarities: Ecology, Gender, and Ethical Calls to Action.” Those interested in participating in the roundtable as featured speakers, please contact Sophie McCall at smccall@sfu.ca.Proposals for individual presentations should include the presenter’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; the presentation’s title; and a 250-word abstract that should identify the presenter’s desired format. Proposals for special sessions should include the session organizer’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; a list of confirmed participants’ names and affiliations; the session’s title; a 250-word description of the session’s goals, format, and significance, and 100-word descriptions of each participant’s contribution to the session.

    The deadline for all proposals is February 1st, 2016. All proposals should be sent to ilsaconference@gmail.com.

CFP – pdf file: CFP Storying Solidarities for ILSA 2016

Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians at the Frontline of Resistance

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Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians
at the Frontline of Resistance

With Robert Lovelace
Queens University Lecturer & former Anoch Algonquin Chief

Friday, November 27 @ 1pm

Room 098, Henry Angus Building
2053 Main Mall, Unceded & Occupied Musqueam Territory

For more information: sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Stolen Land : Stolen Voices Canada and Israel are both built on land and resources stolen by European settlers; both are still sustained by the ongoing repression of indigenous peoples. The indigenous peoples of Canada and Palestine are on the front lines resisting the destruction of the land by militarism and industrial extraction. In the mainstream media and the halls of power, indigenous activists’ voices and stories have been silenced – they are treated as terrorists or historical curiosities. This event will explore the commonalities of indigenous struggles for land and freedom in Canada and in Palestine as well as connections to the global fight for a decolonized world.

Robert Lovelace is an adjunct lecturer at Queen’s University specialising in Aboriginal Studies, Re-indigenisation and De-colonisation. Robert is an anti-colonial activist and retired chief of the Anoch Algonquin First Nation. He spent 3½ months in jail as a political prisoner for defending the Ardoch homeland from uranium exploration. Robert has sailed twice on the Freedom Flotilla attempting to break the siege of Gaza. He lives at Eel Lake in traditional Ardoch territory.

UBC Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights • sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Sponsored by UBC Social Justice Centre, Seriously Free Speech Committee. Endorsed by Boycott Israeli Apartheid Campaign, Canada Palestine Association/BDS Vancouver, Canadian Boat to Gaza, Independent Jewish Voices – Vancouver, Mobilisation Against War and Occupation, North West Indigenous Council, South Asian Network for Secularism and Democracy, Streams of Justice, United Network for a Just Peace in Palestine and Israel.

Hear 6 Latin American Artists Who Rock In Indigenous Languages

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Hear 6 Latin American Artists Who Rock In Indigenous Languages

By Jasmine Garsd

October 15, 2015 1:30 PM ET

This week on Alt.Latino, we feature artists who showcase their musical talents in indigenous languages from Mapuche to Tzotzil, Guarani and Quechua. These young musicians — from Chile, Argentina, Bolivia, Guatemala and Mexico — defy industry norms that say singing in Spanish or Portuguese is the only way to get on the radio.

Of course, this is only a handful of the singers and bands we’ve been enjoying recently. Join us in the comments to share and recommend your own favorites. Read More…

Original Article: http://www.npr.org/sections/altlatino/2015/03/05/390934624/hear-6-latin-american-artists-who-rock-in-indigenous-languageshttp://remezcla.com/lists/books-indigenous-languages-americas/

Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC, Nov. 4, 2015, 12-1pm

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Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC

On Wednesday, November 4th from 12-1pm will be Lecture by Dr. Sarah Hunt titled ‘Embodying Self-Determination: resisting violence’. In this talk, Sarah will argue that the erasure of trans and Two-Spirit people is an ongoing form of violence which is integrally connected to the violent manifestations of colonial heteropatriarchy in the lives of Indigenous women and girls. Across these sites and scales of gendered epistemic and material violence, Sarah will discuss the decolonial imperative to advance Indigenous gender-based analyses that foster the agency and self-determination of all our relations.

Where: the Liu Institute Multipurpose room. Lunch will be provided with an RSVP! However folks are welcome to attend even without an RSVP.

More information and RSVPs can be found at the link below: http://grsj.arts.ubc.ca/events/

Reference: Office of Graduate Programs and Research. NewsFlash #737, October 30, 2015

 

Folks are also encouraged to check out our Facebook Page at: https://www.facebook.com/Social-Justice-Institute-UBC-Events-512911055409313/timeline/

And tweet to @GRSJInstitute

Public talk with writer/activist Arthur Manuel – Oct 21, 2015, 9-12 pm

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Wednesday October 21:
Public talk with writer/activist Arthur Manuel
Arthur Manuel, a forceful advocate for Aboriginal title and rights in Canada, co-authored the recent book Unsettling Canada: A National Wake Up Call with Grand Chief Ronald M. Derrikson. Their work not only constructs a plan for a new sustainable indigenous economy, but also lays out a decolonizing roadmap for getting there. Please join him for this free public discussion.

Wednesday, October 21, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, First Nations Longhouse

For more information, contact Natalie Clark.

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