decolonization

SFPIRG: Truth-Telling and Decolonization

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Decolonization 101

Saturday March 15th, 11am – 5pm
Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House, Vancouver

In this interactive, experiential workshop we will explore the history and impacts of colonization in Canada, with the aim of understanding how we can now work to create positive social change. We will focus primarily on specific contexts for non-Indigenous people’s decolonizing work. This will include creating space to define who we are as individuals and look at what decolonization means, within ourselves and the systems we work within. We will practice taking personal responsibility, including looking at what stops us and how we can overcome these struggles. Our aim will be to build allegiance with centuries of Indigenous resistance and to build new models for moving forward.

The workshop will be facilitated by Rain Daniels. Rain is Anishinaabe from the Saugeen Nation in Ontario, born in Coast Salish territory in Vancouver. She has worked with both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and communities for the last 20 years in capacities that include front-line work and community development. She also facilitates training, educational
workshops, and community processes. Enhancing working relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people is the focus of her work.

Everyone welcome. A light lunch will be provided. ASL translation will be provided if requested before Fri. March 7th. (Request when registering.)

Register here.

The Simon Fraser Public Interest Research Group (SFPIRG) is a student-funded and student-directed resource centre dedicated to social and environmental justice. SFPIRG is founded on a set of values that have been developed by successive generations of students who care about social and environmental justice. These values include a commitment to the work of ending all forms of oppression; and one key piece of anti-oppression is the work of learning about and resisting colonialism – or, to put it another way, the work of promoting decolonization.

At SFPIRG we see decolonization as a process that is relevant to every one of us. As Nora Burke wrote in Building a “Canadian” Decolonization Movement: Fighting the Occupation at “Home,” “Decolonization is not a process which entails solely the Indigenous nations of this continent. All people living in Canada have been distorted by colonialism.” To recover from this distortion requires that each of us learn new ways of relating to one another, to the land, to Indigenous nations and to the Canadian state.

Read more here.

Racialized Students Resistance! 2014 Conference

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Racialized Students Resistance! 2014 Conference

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call for abstracts

We are pleased to announce our call for abstracts for Racialized Students Resistance! 2014 Conference organized by the Centre for Race Autobiography Gender and Age (RAGA) Graduate and Undergraduate Student Networks. We welcome post-secondary students from the RAGA Networks to submit abstracts (to join one of the networks, please see information below) for either an oral or poster presentation.

This conference welcomes presentations which centre on critical approaches to Indigenous, critical race and feminist scholarships, including Indigenous Feminisms, Post/Colonial, Anti-Racism, Mestiza, Black Feminist Thought and LGBTQIA scholarship. The one day conference focuses on enacting processes of unmasking; de/reconstructing; in/visibilizing; reclaiming; and creating. The Racialized Students Resistance! 2014 Conference will offer a critically informed platform to address subtle and explicit institutionalized systems of violence and oppression – often experienced by racialized individuals and their various communities.

We encourage the widest possible range of presentation topics that embrace intersectional critical approaches. We challenge ourselves to include multiple and alternative knowledges that disrupt dominant academic frameworks. We purposefully seek diverse presentation formats including art talks,  oral presentations, spoken word, and short films/documentaries. We also support non-traditional poster presentation submissions (i.e. collages, photographic vignettes, and all forms of visual art).

For more information about the submission process, please visit RAGA Network blog http://ragastudentnetwork.wordpress.com/. All primary authors will receive an email confirmation regarding their submission. Upon completion of the review process, all authors will receive a decision notification.

Submission deadline: February 19, 2014

ragacentre@gmail.com

Who should submit an abstract?

You are currently enrolled in a post-secondary institution

You are a member of the RAGA Undergraduate or Graduate Network

Your work engages with critical approaches to Indigenous, critical race and feminist scholarships

How to Join the RAGA Undergraduate and Graduate Student Networks: any post-secondary student from any institution (around the world) may join one of the 2 RAGA Student Networks by contacting the RAGA Network administrator via email ragacentre@gmail.com with ‘Request to join RAGA student network’ in the subject line. Details on how to join can also be found on the Raga Network Blog: http://ragastudentnetwork.wordpress.com/.

Learning from the Land: Indigenous Land-based Pedagogy and Decolonization

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Abstracts Due January 15th, 2014.

Papers due May 5th, 2014.

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society invites submissions from scholars, artists, and activists for a new issue of the journal exploring Land Based Education in theory and practice, guest edited by Glen Coulthard (University of British Columbia, Dene), Stephanie Irlbacher-Fox (University of Alberta), Matthew Wildcat (UBC, Cree) and Mandee McDonald (University of Victoria, Cree) in conjunction with the Editors of Decolonization.

Confirmed contributors to this volume include Glen Coulthard, Leanne Simpson, Taiaiake Alfred, Richard Van Camp, Stephanie Irlbacher-Fox, Matthew Wildcat and Mandee McDonald.

This issue invites contributors to discuss the role of land based education in the process of Decolonization. The issue will have two broad themes but contributors are encouraged to employ multiple orientations and emphasis.

The first theme is the practice of land based education. Submissions can range focus from pedagogical to political considerations, including:

  • Land based pedagogy: content, methods, and values within the practice of land based education for students and educators;
  • Indigenous articulations of land based education;
  • Contemporary and historical examples of Indigenous understandings of land based education;
  • The practice of working with communities, community members and elders in land based education;
  • How elder and community based perspectives are given space within land based education and the obstacles presented by orientations that (implicitly) privilege the epistemic standing of Universities and University affiliated educators;
  • Creating and maintaining sites of land based education within a contemporary context focused on prioritizing cost saving and job training education models;
  • Practices of education outside of mainstream institutions of education, or land based education as a site of struggle within institutions of education.

The second theme invites theoretical contributions about the land as a source of knowledge, learning and critique. As many have explored, engaging in a relationship with the ecology of the land, and non-human persons contains cultural knowledge about self, person-hood and relationships. Building upon indigenous epistemologies and other scholarly writing, the second theme asks for contributors to reflect upon ideas such as:

  • Land as a source of knowledge, learning and critique;
  • Indigenous conceptions of land, self, personhood and relationship;
  • Land relationships and ethics – personal, environmental, economic;
  • Articulating the connection between of land as a source knowledge to the practice of land based education;
  • Connections between land, dispossession, education, self-determination and decolonization.

The special issue is intended for audiences including and beyond academia including classroom and land based educators, policy makers, artists, and community members.

The editors welcome non-peer review papers, visual art, audio, photography, video, poetry or personal narratives that challenge the boundaries of scholarly production, either integrated with/in an article or as stand alone pieces.

Contributions are asked to submit an abstract by January 15th, 2014. Abstracts should be submitted toeditors@decolonization.org. Abstracts should be no longer than 200 words and indicate the following:

  • What theme your paper most closely aligns with.
  • The format of your submission (article, poetry, etc)
  • If you wish to have your article peer reviewed.

Article length submissions will be due May 5th, 2014. Selected articles will be published in late November/early December 2014.

Articles should follow our journal style guidelines, which can be found here:

http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Scholarly articles are subject to a double-blind peer review and details can be found here:

http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess

http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/announcement/view/423

Call for Papers – DECOLONIZING ANTI-RACISM

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Call for Papers – Strategies of Critique: Conference of the Graduate Program in Social & Political Thought

York University, Toronto, April 17th & 18th, 2014

DECOLONIZING ANTI-RACISM

In their article “Decolonizing Anti-Racism,” Bonita Lawrence and Ena Dua (2005) suggest that people of colour are complicit in colonization, and that anti-racism movements exclude Aboriginal people and perspectives. This article sparked a response by Nandita Sharma and Cynthia Wright (2008), who critiqued Lawrence and Dua’s conflation of settler colonialism and immigration, which Sharma and Wright argue includes in the definition of “settler” those who immigrate due to the impacts of colonization elsewhere. Sharma and Wright (2008) also questioned the implications of achieving decolonization through a nationalist project. These two seminal texts sparked a heated debate among scholars from various disciplines and have led to increased studies, discussions, and theorizations that consider, as a starting point, ongoing settler colonialism in Canada and elsewhere.

The theme “Decolonizing Anti-Racism” lays at the intersections of struggles for liberation, yet, at the same time, questions the possibilities of freedom in the context of the ongoing colonization of indigenous peoples and lands. Strategies of Critique invites scholars, activists, and artists to reflect on the contradictions that arise in struggles stemming from a “postcolonial world” in which colonialism is not past, but rather still very much present. We seek papers that attend to the implications of anti-racism activism and scholarly engagements that reimagine the socio-political world in which we live by having at their forefront a concern for the experiences of Indigenous peoples. Further, we are interested in the ways that anti-racism theory and practice uphold and sustain colonial discourse, and how, conversely, we can imagine our communities and ourselves without reproducing colonial dynamics within social movements and scholarship that works within a social justice framework.

We invite scholars, activists and artists to engage in critical inquiry that addresses the potential tensions between Indigenous and people of colour movements. Possible questions for exploration include: What are some of the bridges that can be built between Indigenous peoples and people of colour in struggles against racism, social exclusion, poverty, racialization, police violence, as well as through shared histories of colonization and dispossession? Is it possible to think of an anti-racist politics that is devoid of anti-colonial politics? In what ways do extant imperial and colonial forces operate differently towards these communities in terms of necropolitics (Mbembe, 2002) in determining who is invited into the realm of social life and who, instead, is confined to social death? This question—who must die so we may live—is central to our discussion on the theme of “decolonizing anti-racism.”

We welcome submissions from all fields that relate to Indigenous studies, social and political theory, critical race theory, anti-racism theory, settler-colonialism, postcolonial theory, art and literature, critical disability studies, gender, feminist and women’s studies, and equity studies.

We extend this invitation to community members and social justice activists who engage in this discussion through their community work or activist endeavours.

Possible topics include, but are in no way limited to:

Indigenous sovereignty

Immigration and citizenship

Racialization

Police brutality/racial profiling

Environmental racism

(Neo)colonialism and settler-colonialism

Who/What is a “settler”?

Decolonization of the land and the mind

Shared histories of colonization

National and alternative memories

Decolonizing gender, sex, and sexuality

Homonationalism

Disciplining of bodies

Diaspora

Notions of home and belonging

Critical intersectionality

Trauma and healing

Indigenous methodologies/decolonizing scholarship

Creative and narrative resistance

Alliances and oppositions in anti-racism and decolonization projects

Submission Guidelines:

Please submit your abstract no later than January 15, 2014 by email to strategies2014[at]gmail[dot]com.

Submissions must include the following elements in order to be considered:

1. A document (.doc or .pdf) containing an abstract of no more than 250 words, with title. Ensure that the author’s name(s) does not appear in the document, or in the text in a way that will compromise the anonymity of the review process.

2. A separate document (.doc or .pdf) containing biographical details: author name(s), institutional affiliation(s) (if applicable) and contact information.

3. Panel proposals should include a 250-word statement of the panel’s focus, and the abstracts and bios of proposed presenters.

Applicants will be notified of the decisions of the review committee by mid-February. For more information, please contact the conference committee at strategies2014[at]gmail[dot]com.

http://www.critical-theory.com/submits-your-papers-strategies-of-critique-decolonizing-anti-racism/

Call for Papers: Problématique

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In 2006, Stephen Harper touted Canada as “an emerging energy superpower”. Since then, a new politics of resistance, such as Idle No More, the Anti-Fracking movement, and Stop Line 9, has rallied to oppose this agenda and offer alternatives. In Problématique issue 14, we want seek answers to the following questions: How do these new politics of resistance help us question the current direction of economic, social and environmental development in Canada? How do they help us reimagine our role as academics, and in particular the often assumed relation between theory and practice? What alternatives do such movements suggest? With these questions in mind, we invite papers from a variety of disciplines and methodologies that touch on any of these questions or address themes such as:

۰The ethics of energy extraction, production, and consumption

۰Political ecology perspectives

۰Emerging social movements

۰New politics of resistance

۰Indigenous self-determination and radical politics

۰Land-based politics

۰Neoliberal policy and development in Canada

۰Corporate power and responsibility

۰Corporate and state repression of dissent

We welcome previously unpublished academic articles of 4000-6000 words, photo-essays, interviews, or reviews of up to 1000 words that address the problématique of alternative/radical perspectives on the intersections of politics, economics, the environment, and new subjectivities in Canada.

Please submit to problematique.yorku@gmail.com by March 1st 2014