Environmental justice

Funding – David Suzuki Fellowship program, Due: Feb 1, 2017

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The new David Suzuki Fellowship program will empower emerging scholars to tackle complex environmental problems. It will reduce financial barriers, provide mentorship and foster leadership and creativity so fellows can conduct research and engage and inform the public and policy-makers. One fellowship each will be available in Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. The Vancouver-based fellow will join the Foundation’s Science and Policy team and research innovative clean energy solutions and/or the economics of sustainable development.

Each fellowship is valued at $50,000 stipend plus up to $5,000 in travel and professional expenses.

For details about eligibility, program structure, and application process, please see http://fellowships.davidsuzuki.org/

All questions should be directed to fellowships@davidsuzuki.org

Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and Environmental Justice, Hampshire College

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SEARCH: #507
DATE POSTED: 08/10/2016
TYPE/DEPARTMENT: Faculty in Critical Social Inquiry
SEARCH STATUS: Searching for Candidates – Accepting Applications
APPLY NOW: Would you like to apply for this position?

Hampshire College, an independent, innovative liberal arts institution and member of the Five College consortium, is accepting applications for an assistant professor of Native American studies and environmental justice. Hampshire College is committed to building a culturally diverse intellectual community and strongly encourages applications from women and minority candidates.

 

The successful candidate will demonstrate deep understanding of the connections between environmental degradation and intersecting systems of oppression based in race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, etc., with a particular focus on Native American Studies. We seek candidates who have experience working with tribal communities concerning issues such as environmental justice, food sovereignty, food and water security, climate change, treaty rights, and environmental concerns. Candidates whose scholarship considers relations among Native American nations and communities as well as federal, state, and local governments; Western science; and Indigenous knowledges are particularly encouraged to apply. We are open to applicants from a variety of fields or interdisciplinary areas of study (e.g., American studies, anthropology, development studies, environmental studies, gender studies, geography, law, policy, political ecology, sociology, etc.).

 

This position will be located in Hampshire’s interdisciplinary School of Critical Social Inquiry. The School supports a range of approaches, perspectives, and methods of inquiry, strongly emphasizing an understanding of race in the U.S. and non-Western histories, politics, social structures, and cultures. The successful candidate will share the School’s commitment to understanding the processes of continually changing social and cultural formations and their implications for people’s lives. The successful candidate will also be connected with the Five College Native American and Indigenous Studies Certificate program. Candidates are requested to articulate how their teaching, scholarship, mentorship and/or community service would support the commitment to diversity and inclusion articulated in the College’s diversity statement.

 

Ph.D. required. Teaching load is two courses per semester. Active research in support of teaching and interest in assisting students with their own independent research projects are expected.

 

Review of applications will begin on November 1, 2016.  Hampshire College offers a competitive salary and excellent benefit program.  Applicants should submit a statement of teaching and research interests, curriculum vita, sample syllabi, sample of written scholarship, and three letters of recommendation via our website at https://jobs.hampshire.edu

 

http://www.hampshire.edu

Hampshire College is an equal opportunity institution, committed to diversity and inclusion in education and employment.

 

Globally significant landmark agreement reached

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Globally significant landmark agreement reached

First Nations, environmental groups and coastal forest industry representatives joined the Province today to celebrate achieving ecosystem-based management in the Great Bear Rainforest.

The Great Bear Rainforest was established through land-use decisions announced in 2006. This globally unique area covers 6.4 million hectares on British Columbia’s north and central coast, and is home to 26 separate First Nations. Ecosystem-based management in the area is defined as “concurrent achievement of high levels of ecological integrity and high levels of human well-being.”

Under the new Great Bear Rainforest land-use order, ecological integrity is achieved through increasing the amount of protected old-growth forest to 70% from 50%. As well, eight new special forest management areas covering almost 295,000 hectares will be off-limits to logging. Six may receive additional protection based on ongoing discussions with First Nations. With the new measures, 85% of the forest will be protected and 15% will be available for logging, supporting local jobs.

The land-use order also addresses First Nations’ cultural heritage resources, freshwater ecosystems and wildlife habitat. The amount of habitat protected for the marbled murrelet, northern goshawk, grizzly bear, mountain goat and tailed frog will increase as new reserves required by the order are developed.

The Province has signed reconciliation protocols with the Coastal First Nations and Nanwakolas Council. Through these government-to-government relationships, separate human well-being agreements have been reached to address issues of special concern to each group of First Nations. Most notably, both have an increased stake in the forest sector. The commercial grizzly bear hunt will cease in Coastal First Nations’ traditional territories.

The Province has committed to amending atmospheric benefit-sharing agreements with Nanwakolas and Coastal First Nations. This will increase the forest carbon credits they can use to support implementation of ecosystem-based management and community development projects of importance to them.

Because of the uniqueness of the Great Bear Rainforest and the innovative elements in the new and amended agreements, the B.C. government intends to introduce supporting legislation in spring 2016.

https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016PREM0011-000122

Nine First Nations Unite With Declaration Against LNG Tankers in B.C. Salmon Waters

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by Daniel Mesec on 1/26/16
To the deep beat of drums, hereditary chiefs and elders from coastal and inland First Nations entered the Highlander Hotel and Convention Centre, packed with more than 300 people. They were there for a show of strength and unity against government and the onslaught of gas development in the heart of their traditional lands, the “bread basket” of the Lax Kw’alaams people.

On Saturday January 23 the Lelu Island Declaration was signed by the nine allied tribes of Lax Kw’alaams as well as other hereditary and elected chiefs from neighboring nations, sending a clear message to government and industry that the Skeena watershed will not allow the $11 billion Pacific Northwest Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project to be built.

The tribes decreed that First Nations have not only rights, but also responsibilities, when it comes to harvesting from and sustaining the environment.

“Our ancestral knowledge, supported by modern science, confirms this area is critical to the future abundance of the wild salmon our communities rely on,” the declaration said. “It is our right and our responsibility as First Nations to protect and defend this place. It is our right to use this area without interference to harvest salmon and marine resources for our sustenance, and commercially in support of our livelihoods.”

Salmon is the link, said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) in his remarks closing the weekend summit. Read more…

“Annexed:” The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the UN Climate Change Conference 2015

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December 16, 2015

On December 12, 2015, after two decades of climate talks within the UN Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC), world leaders from 195 countries in Paris came to a consensus on a legally binding agreement on climate change, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2°C and reducing carbon emissions across the globe. The two-week long Conference of Parties (COP 21) process also brought together some of the world’s largest corporations, environmental and human rights organizations, and grassroots activists to hash out international energy goals, standards, and implementation. Over 250 Indigenous delegates were present and advocated for the inclusion of Indigenous rights in the Paris Agreement.
Hailed as “historic” and as “a turning point for the world,” the deal reached its goal to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change, yet disappointed many Indigenous Peoples due to its ultimate failure to include legally binding references to protecting Indigenous Peoples rights and their sovereignty.

Read More…

Indigenous Peoples’ International Roundtable on Forests and Climate Change, Oct. 8, 5-7pm

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YOU ARE INVITED!

Forestry Event Image

Indigenous Peoples’ International Roundtable
on Forests and Climate Change

The University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Forestry and WWF International Forest and Climate Programme are sponsoring an international roundtable to facilitate discussion by Indigenous Peoples’ representatives of the important issues of forests and climate change.

The roundtable will support ongoing preparations by Indigenous Peoples for the Conference of Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December 2015 as well as beyond.

The roundtable will bring together Indigenous representatives from all regions of the world, including Canada, to strategize on best ways for policy advocacy at the national and international levels.

Open meeting with UBC community

An open meeting with the UBC community and the general public is organized to interact with delegates and share views on forest governance and climate change.

Thursday, October 8, 2015

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

(Light refreshments at 4:15 – 4:45 pm)

2424 Main Mall, room 1005
Forest Sciences Centre, UBC
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4

RSVP

Please RSVP by October 1: caryn.horii@ubc.ca

Feel free to forward this invite to friends and colleagues.

Job – Assistant or Associate Professor, Ethnoecology (tenure-track or tenured)

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Assistant or Associate Professor, Ethnoecology (tenure-track or tenured)

School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria

Assistant Professor or Associate Professor, Ethnoecology (Tenure-track or tenured),
July 1, 2016 start date

We seek an Assistant or Associate Professor for our distinctive program in ethnoecology, which we define as the study of cultural ecological knowledge of the interactions between human societies and their environments. We are interested in sustaining our strength in ethnobotany, or the study of the relationships between plants and people, but are open to all concentrations within the field. Ethnoecology provides an integrated approach to understanding and appreciating human relationships with their environments, inclusive of lands, waters and the life forms they support. The ecological knowledge systems of Indigenous and other local peoples are increasingly being brought into dynamic dialogue with conservation biology and ecological restoration, and are also intimately connected to political dynamics. Ecological restoration and political ecology are the other two research and teaching streams of our School.

The successful applicant will have leadership experience with demonstrable potential to carry forward the momentum in ethnoecology that has been built by Professor Nancy Turner. We seek an applicant who has a proven track record of rigorous community-engaged research that is responsive to the needs of Indigenous peoples on environmental issues, and an interest in working alongside First Nations communities in British Columbia. The successful candidate will hold a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline, have demonstrated ability to connect ecological and cultural knowledge, a strong track record of interdisciplinary work with faculty and students of diverse interests, evidence of high-quality undergraduate teaching and graduate supervision, and dedication to long-term community-based knowledge and learning. We are open to any area of concentration within the field of ethnoecology. A focus on ethnobotany would be a strong asset as would experience working with BC First Nations and north-western North American plants and ecosystems.

The School of Environmental Studies, http://web.uvic.ca/enweb/ is supported by three overlapping streams of scholarship: ethnoecology, ecological restoration and political ecology. Please visit our website for more details about our program.

The University of Victoria is an equity employer and encourages applications from women, persons with disabilities, visible minorities, Aboriginal Peoples, people of all sexual orientations and genders, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of the University.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Please provide a single PDF which includes a research statement, the names of three referees we may contact, a copy of your CV, and a teaching dossier. You may apply by hard copy, or by email.

We will begin reviewing applications by October 15, 2015.

Please send hard copy, if you prefer, to:

Karena Shaw Ph.D.

Director, School of Environmental Studies
University of Victoria
PO BOX 1700 STN CSC

Victoria, British Columbia
V8W 2Y2 Canada

NOTE: Courier use:
David Turpin Building B243
3800 Finnerty Road (Ring Road)
Victoria, B.C. V8P 5C2

You may also submit your application via email to: esapps@uvic.ca