First Nations

Assistant or Associate Professor of History of First Nations and Indigenous Art and Cultural Practices – Art History Department, UBC. Due: Oct 2, 2016

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Assistant or Associate Professor in the History of First Nations and Indigenous Art and Cultural Practices
Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory
The University of British Columbia
Vancouver Campus

The Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory invites applications for a tenure-stream appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor or Associate Professor in the field of historical and contemporary First Nations and Indigenous Art and Cultural Practices. Scholars with any research specialization in First Nations / Indigenous North American studies are welcome to apply. The successful candidate will be an active scholar in the most advanced theoretical and methodological concerns of the field.

Applicants must have a PhD (or have successfully defended their dissertation) in art history or a related discipline by the position start date. They are expected to provide strong evidence of active and excellent research, and to demonstrate a record of, or potential for, high-quality teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The successful candidate will be required to teach the history of Indigenous arts from the Pacific Northwest and will be expected to maintain an active program of research, publication, teaching, graduate supervision and service.

UBC, one of the largest and most distinguished universities in Canada, has excellent resources for scholarly research. The Art History program offers a diploma, BA, MA, and PhD degrees, and partners with departmental programs in Visual Art and in Critical and Curatorial Studies (www.ahva.ubc.ca). This position presents the opportunity to engage with an interdisciplinary group of scholars within the larger academic community, including the First Nations and Indigenous Studies program, the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies, the Museum of Anthropology, the Peter A. Allard School of Law, and the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice. In addition there is an active community of Indigenous artists working in Vancouver.

Applicants should apply through the UBC Faculty careers website (http://www.hr.ubc.ca/careers/faculty-careers/) and be prepared to upload the following in the order listed: a letter of application; a detailed curriculum vitae; statement of research and teaching philosophies; a sample dissertation chapter or scholarly paper; evidence of teaching potential and effectiveness; and a one-page statement identifying the applicant’s contributions, or potential contributions, to diversity, along with their ability to work with a culturally international student body. Applicants should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference submitted by email to: ahva.head@ubc.ca, or by mail to: Professor Scott Watson, Chair, Art History Search Committee, Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory, University of British Columbia, 400-6333 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z2, Canada.

The anticipated start date of employment is as early as July 1, 2017.

This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Deadline: Applications and all supporting materials must be received by September 30, 2016. Review of applications will begin soon after this date and will continue until the position is filled.

UBC hires on the basis of merit and is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community. We especially welcome applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to productively engage with diverse communities. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

Job – Aboriginal Infant Development Worker, Westbank First Nation. May 13, 2016

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TITLE: Aboriginal Infant Development Worker SALARY: Commensurate with experience DEPARTMENT: Early Years – Community Services TERM: Full Time Term (4 years)

POSITION SUMMARY:

*WFN BAND MEMBER PREFERRED*

The Aboriginal Infant Development Worker is a fixed-term, grant-funded position primarily responsible for providing support and services to families with children aged 0 – 6 with a focus on birth to age 3.

 

  • Interested applicants should email an application form, cover letter, and resume by Friday, May 13, 2016.Recruitment/Training & Development Coordinator Westbank First Nation
    301-515 Hwy 97 South, Kelowna, BC V1Z 3J2 Fax: (250) 769-4377
    Email: careers@wfn.ca

Full Posting: Aboriginal Infant Dev Worker

 

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

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Aaron Carapella Son Sequoyah
Courtesy Brian McDermott
“Map guy” Aaron Carapella is pictured here with his son, Sequoyah.

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

4/10/15

In the beginning, there were no lines.

Prior to 1492, North America was a vast wilderness: an expanse of rolling hills, open plains and meandering rivers. There were no state boundaries, no borders between countries and no private property.

That’s what Aaron Carapella captures in his Tribal Nations Maps, the only known maps that show what Turtle Island looked like before European contact.

“There are a lot of horrible maps out there that stereotype Native Americans or provide misinformation,” said Carapella, who lives in Stigler, Oklahoma. “We need something to combat that. We need maps that aren’t divided by modern countries and political borders, that show where tribes were and what they were called.”

The original Tribal Nations Map, released in 2012, is a poster-sized replica of the United States, minus the state lines. Roughly 590 Native nations are spread across the map, identified by their indigenous names, traditional locations and, when possible, historic images.

Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella, who is of Cherokee descent, spent 14 years researching and creating his first map. But the project began years earlier when Carapella, now 35, was a teenager exploring his own heritage and looking for a map of tribes that he could hang on his bedroom wall.

“I never really found any good maps that were comprehensive in any way,” he said. “So I thought, why don’t I make my own? I bought four poster boards, taped them together and put on all the tribes that I knew.”

The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella got serious about his project when he realized so many Native people had never seen themselves represented on a map. He traveled to 250 Native communities and contacted every cultural department in North America, he said.

“I’ve used books, military records, settler documentation and autobiographies,” he said. “On road trips, I get off the highway and visit tribal communities. Everywhere I go, I’m talking to people.”

The result was the map of the United States, of which Carapella has already sold 3,200 copies and given away an additional 900. The maps are in classrooms, cultural centers and museums across the country. They’re also in homes, on bedroom walls and in researches’ offices.

A documentarian is making a film about Carapella’s project, and Hayden-McNeil, a textbook publishing company, is printing two of the maps in an upcoming book.

But Carapella decided not to stop with a map of the United States. He created additional maps showing locations of tribes—along with their traditional names—in Canada, Alaska, Mexico and Central America. He also offers a map of the entire North American continent identifying more than 1,000 tribes—and without the “artificial boundaries” established later.

“My next map is of South America,” Carapella said. “I don’t think I’m going to stop until I’ve done all the maps in the Western Hemisphere.”

The maps are already changing public perception in places like Olympia, Washington, where the map of the entire North American continent hangs on a wall at the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College. Program coordinator Karama Blackhorn said it serves as a conversation starter and a way to help indigenous students feel welcome.

Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

“The biggest problem minority students find is they don’t have a sense of belonging; they don’t see themselves in faculty, staff or other students,” she said. “There’s no Native representation on campus except anthropological. This is a giant, visual art piece that reminds people to stop having that historical mentality.”

Blackhorn, a member of the Kahosadi tribe of Oregon, said she grew up with a map that had only 12 tribes on it. Carapella’s map is the most comprehensive representation of Native America she’s ever seen.

“My family is on the map now,” she said. “This is validating on so many levels.”

In a classroom on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, history teacher William Stearns uses the maps to help students make connections to their own heritage.

“When you see students see these maps you can see the pride in them,” he said. “They stand taller, they understand. I believe that they have a clearer picture of their importance in this country.”

Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)
Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)

In an age where few places on the planet remain uncharted, cartography may seem an antiquated craft. But for Carapella, the project is an exploration not of geography, but rather history. In essence, he’s going back in time to capture a view of the land in its pre-colonial state.

For some, the maps are happy reminders of forgotten cultures. For others, they bring up difficult aspects of history or conflicted emotions. Any response, Carapella said, is evidence that he’s doing his job.

“It’s weird how many emotions get stirred up,” he said. “They are factual maps of where our nations were and what they were called, but they spark questions. They make people think in a different way.”

Carapella’s maps are available in various sizes and range in price from $49 to $300. Buy them online here.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/10/changing-perceptions-and-making-connections-one-map-time-159925

Call for proposals- Concurrent sessions Canadian Association of Graduate Studies Annual Conference. Due: Apr 30, 2016

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Call for proposals- Concurrent sessions
 
CAGS invites submissions for concurrent sessions for the 2016 CAGS Annual Conference to be held at the Hyatt Regency in Toronto, November 2-4.  
 
All submissions should reflect this year’s conference theme:
 
Accessing graduate studies
 
We welcome proposals that touch on topics that address aboriginal issues; issues of disability; issues relating to financial and/or social challenges facing graduate students. Proponents are urged to develop panels providing a well-rounded discussion and practical advice if possible to the particular issue being addressed. A concurrent session lasts 75 minutes and should allow sufficient time for adequate discussion and exchange with participants. Student perspectives are welcomed.
 
Please provide a working session title, a description, and name(s) of proposed speaker(s). 
 
Please note that there is no monetary compensation awarded to speakers. CAGS can provide some audio-visual assistance for presentations.
 
Proposals will be accepted until April 30, 2016.
 
Forward proposals and contact information to lbenoit@cags.ca  using the title: “Concurrent session 2016”.

 

Director, Aboriginal Education, North Island College. Due: Mar 28, 2016

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Posting Preview
Posting Details
Title Director, Aboriginal Education
Posting Number 101116
Posting Date 03-08-2016
Closing Date 03-28-2016
Status Admin-Regular
Position Summary
Reporting to the Assistant Vice President, Access and Regions, the
Director of Aboriginal Education is responsible for the strategic direction of
Aboriginal Education at the College.
Within the context of the College Plan and in conjunction with the Senior
Educational Team (SET), the Director is responsible for the development
and preservation of strategic educational planning relationships with the
First Nations throughout the College region. The Director will implement a
robust process of continuous assessment in program demand in the
pursuit of mutually beneficial opportunities to increase education
accessibility and student enrollment throughout NIC Region. The Director
shall collaborate with Deans, Department Chairs, and the Registrar and
actively participate in the planning of programs, services, policy, and
procedures, which facilitates access, retention, and student success,
within the College community.
The Director is the first point of contact for the Ministry of Advanced
Education, First Nations Councils and School Districts within the College
region on all matters related to Aboriginal education. The Director is
accountable for ensuring the collation of accurate information regarding
the educational needs of the Aboriginal population, sources of funding
available to assist the College in meeting those needs, and collaboration
with SET and those responsible for Aboriginal education, in the
development of funding proposals specifically designed to meet those
needs.
A primary purpose of the position is to build capacity within North Island
College, and to work effectively with First Nations students and faculty
regionally to support and develop the indigenization of the curriculum.
Areas of responsibility include: development of Aboriginal Education Policy
Framework in alignment with CICan Indigenous Protocol commitments;
enhance indigenous-centered services, learning environments, student
and community spaces; and to support the educational goal of First
Nations people in the College region in all matters related to the College
Plan
Please note: The College received special program approval by the BC
Human Rights Tribunal to give preference to the hiring of a person of
Aboriginal ancestry for this position.
Position Competencies – Creates a Positive Climate and Culture
– Effective Communication Skills
– Effectively Develops Goals & Objectives
– Focuses Effectively on Key Results and Priorities
– Demonstrates a Focus on Continuous Improvement
– Interpersonal Effectiveness
– Team Leadership
– Developing Others
– Championing and Adapting to Change
– Collaboration
Duties and Responsibilities
The areas of responsibility include:
1. Educational Leadership;
2. External Communication and Relationship Development;
3. Planning;
4. Financial Management
5. Employee Relations

Description
Required Education & Experience
– The College received special program approval by the BC Human Rights
Tribunal to give preference to the hiring of a person of Aboriginal ancestry
for this position.
– Completion or in progress a Master’s Degree in an appropriate discipline
and demonstrated experience, 3 years’ experience preferred, in a
leadership role in a post-secondary Aboriginal Education setting; which
must include demonstrated management and leadership experience in
Aboriginal Education. Candidates with an undergraduate degree and
considerable experience in Aboriginal Education at a post-secondary
institution, may also be considered.
– A demonstrated record of success in Aboriginal Education and
community development work, resource procurement, grant and proposal
writing and project management.
– Demonstrated experience resolving student concerns, informally and
formally.
Required Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities
– Extensive knowledge of Aboriginal populations within the traditional
territories of thirty-five First Nations inclusive of the Nuu-chah-nulth,
Kwakwaka’wakw and Coast Salish traditions.
– A working knowledge of governance models and related management
approaches.
– Strong interpersonal skills, including communication (written and oral),
negotiation and advocacy skills; particularly in communicating and
consulting with community groups, school districts, industry, local
government agencies, and the College community.
– Demonstrated commitment to collaborative and consultative leadership
and the ability to work effectively within a management team and fastpaced
environment.
– Advanced computer skills as required by the position.
– The ability to plan annual budgets and follow established financial
policies and practices to ensure fiscally responsible management of
expenses.
– The knowledge and ability to implement quality improvement initiatives
and measure outcomes.
– Experience with organizational change practices.
– Experience in the effective management of human resources, within a
unionized workforce and administering collective agreements.
Pay Grade In accordance with the Exempt Administrators’ Salary Scale
Location Campbell River (CR)
Department Assistant Vice-President, Access & Regions
Link to Job Description Director, Aboriginal Education:
https://careers.nic.bc.ca/userfiles/jsp/shared/reports/Report.jsp?time=1457477182219 3/8/2016
Special Instructions to Applicants
Please scan copies of your transcripts into one document for attachment.
If your transcripts are not available at the time of application, please attach
a letter or certificate of confirmation from the educational institution.

Victorian Government to begin talks with First Nations on Australia’s first Indigenous treaty

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Victorian Government to begin talks with First Nations on Australia’s first Indigenous treaty

Updated Fri at 3:56am

The Victorian Government will begin talks to work out Australia’s first treaty with Indigenous people within weeks.

Aim of Victoria’s First Nations Treaty:

  • Recognition of past injustices
  • Recognition of all 39 First Nations and their Clans Authority
  • Recognition of and respect for country, traditions and customs
  • A futures fund to implement and establish the treaty
  • Establishment of a democratic treaty commission
  • Land Rights and Land Acquisition Legislation and Funding
  • Fresh Water and Sea Water Rights

(From the Victorian Traditional Land Owner Justice Group)

A meeting with First Nations representatives, convened by the State Government earlier this month, firmly rejected Constitutional recognition in favour of self-determination and a treaty.

The treaty would be a legal document over Aboriginal affairs and services and addressing past injustices.

It would be the first such agreement in Australia and follow similar arrangements with First Peoples in Canada, the US and New Zealand.

Victoria’s Aboriginal Affairs Minister Natalie Hutchins told Lateline the Government was committed to making it happen.

“At the end of the day it’s pretty disappointing that we, in the year 2016, don’t have a treaty or a national arrangement with our First Peoples,” she said.

Ms Hutchins said Victoria will look at treaty examples in other Commonwealth countries.

“In fact, Canada have been doing it for a long time, New Zealand has successfully done it, so it’s time for Australia to step up,” she said.

Constitutional recognition ‘a distraction’

Dja Dja Warrung elder Gary Murray said the state must pursue the best outcome.

“It’s not difficult to scope a treaty given what’s happened in Canada and New Zealand and other places,” he said.

“I think we pick the best from that and bring it into the modern world.”

Mr Murray said the national debate around Constitutional recognition was just “a distraction”. Read More…

ABC News. “Victorian Government to begin talks with First Nations on Australia’s first Indigenous treaty.” Retrieved from: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-26/victoria-to-begin-talks-for-first-indigenous-treaty/7202492?site=indigenous&topic=latest on March 1, 2016

Final Program – 2016 Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium, March 4 & 5

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Please check out the full program for IGSS!

Complete booklet: Program IGSS 2016 (PDF)

5FinalISSG

Please note the following changes to the program.

Cancelled: “Métis Nations, Relations, and Mixed-bloods: Understanding Dominant Discourses of Métis Identification in British Columbia, Canada” (Poster Session)