food sovereignty

Job – Landed Learning Multimedia Education Assistant, Due: Feb 24, 2017 (deadline extended

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Job Description:

The Intergenerational Landed Learning Project is a unique community education and research project that teams school-aged youth with adult volunteers to build a multigenerational community that learns how to nurture the land and live in balance with the earth, through growing, caring for, cooking, and eating local food.

The Landed Learning Multimedia Education Assistant will use a variety of media (visual, written, and digital) to support the academic, programmatic, research, and fundraising objectives of the Intergenerational Landed Learning Project (ILLP). The Multimedia Education Assistant will develop multi-media educational programming for participants in the Landed Learning Project, as well as integrate multi-media into the communications strategy for the Landed Learning Project. By using multimedia, the student will help participants deepen, enhance, and solidify learning, as well as cultivate enthusiasm for gardens-based learning among the wider community.

The student must be able to commit to being available Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 9am-Noon.

Hourly wage: $16.41

10 hours/week

March-June 2017

The responsibilities include:

Designing and implementing media education programs within the framework of the Project

  • Develop and facilitate photography workshops for elementary program participants in the garden
  • Develop and facilitate blog training workshops for elementary program participants to share their garden-based learning experiences
  • Provide on-going support youth to document their experiences and learning through photography, writing, and photo journalism

Managing the Project’s photography equipment, photos, and other data archives

  • Maintain and troubleshoot program cameras used by program participants
  • Liaise with ILLP teachers to facilitate ongoing documentation, data collection, and reporting of student activities within participating classes
  • Organize, maintain, and archive ILLP documents (e.g. Photographs, surveys, consent forms, volunteer criminal record checks, volunteers hours)

Developing and managing the Project’s communication strategy

  • Document ILLP visits and events through digital photography
  • Select and provide photos for communication and outreach on social media and print materials Student Job
  • Liaise with Web Assistant to design a visual appealing and informative website, relevant to stakeholder audiences (educators, volunteers, parents, students, and funders)
  • Manage social media (Facebook page and blog) to keep stakeholders connected with the Project through a consistent and dynamic on-line presence

Supporting Program Manager and other program activities as needed

Qualifications:

  • Must be a UBC Student
  • Must be available Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 9am-Noon
  • Experience developing curriculum and working with children
  • Aptitude in and experience with on-line communications and social media
  • Expertise with digital cameras, iPads, and digital photography for photodocumentation and reporting (Having your own camera is an asset)
  • Ability to communicate with diplomacy and tact with children, community volunteers, staff, teachers, and donors
  • Interest in and respect for people of all cultures and backgrounds
  • Self-motivation, flexibility, and excellent organization skills; ability to identify and prioritize multiple tasks with minimal supervision
  • Ability to work effectively both in a team setting as well as independently; team player
  • Physically healthy and active. Able to work outdoors in all weather conditions
  • Familiarity with, and commitment to the vision and mission of the Intergenerational Landed Learning project is an asset
  • Successful completion of a criminal record check is required

To Apply: Please send Resume, Cover Letter, and Time Table to landed.learning@ubc.ca. Applications must be received no later than February 17, 2017.

Traditional Naming & Pole Raising Ceremony at the Indigenous Health, Research and Education Garden – 12pm – 3pm, 3 Oct 2016

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Please join us at the garden on Monday October 3rd from 12pm – 3pm for a Traditional Naming and Pole Raising Ceremony. We are honoured to grow medicines, learn, conduct research, and build community on the beautiful unceded territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people, and are grateful to announce that the Indigenous Health, Research and Education Garden will be receiving a traditional Musqueam name.

Indigenous food trading, sharing and discussions, at Enowkin, Penticton. July 13 & 14, 2016

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1. July 13 – Following the leadership of the BC Food Systems Network Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty (WGIFS), the proposed Gathering of Indigenous Food Trading and Sharing (GIFTS) is being planned on July 13, 2016. GIFTS will provide the time and space for Indigenous harvesters to trade and share Indigenous foods and knowledge generated in inter-tribal trade relationships. The gathering is a traditional camp style gathering with free camping and all meals provided. We welcome contributions of Indigenous foods to contribute to the feasts.

Building on the conversational learning and ancient traditional trade practices and protocols, the WGIFS will realize more fully how the social and cultural values encoded within traditional trading and giving economies can inform the development of mutual aid networks. The intention is to increase the number of trading relationships in traditional trade networks, and apply an innovative approach to 1). addressing one or more of the social determinants of health, and 2). advocating for conservation of Indigenous bio-cultural heritage in the land and food system research, action and policy proposals.
2. July 14 – We are excited to celebrate our 10th Anniversary Strategic Meeting of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty at the En’owkin Centre in Penticton, BC, home of our very first Indigenous food sovereignty conference that took place in August of 2006. The WGIFS would like to thank the Syilx Nation and En’owkin Centre for their generous hospitality, as well as our financial sponsor the First Nations Health Authority.
The 10th annual WGIFS Strategic meeting is being planned on the day following GIFTS (July 14), and will provide the time and space to network and introduce the innovative concepts and vision of the project, and increase awareness and sensitivity to the diverse socio-political realities and cultures that are affirmed in Indigenous relationships to food, land, and inter-tribal trading and giving economies.
3. July 15, 16 & 17 – The 10th annual WGIFS meeting and GIFTS will lead into the 18th Annual BC Food Systems Network Gathering being planned for July 15, 16, & 17 at the same venue. Following the theme of Reconciling Cultures:Reconnecting Foodscapes, the BCFSN Gathering will provide the time and space for WGIFS members and Indigenous participants to reconcile Indigenous food systems with sustainable agri-food system issues, concerns, situations and strategies.
The cross cultural conversations will increase community resiliency by flexing our ability to overcome cross cultural learning tension and identify potential that exists within the gaps of knowledge where Indigenous food system meets the rapidly expanding movement of sustainable agriculture.
To RSVP reply to this message ASAP or visit our facebook events page: https://www.facebook.com/events/507787819405373/
To learn more about Indigenous food sovereignty visit our website: http://indigenousfoodsystems.org/
To register for the BC Food Systems Network Gathering go online to website address: http://bcfsn.org/annual-gathering/

Dawn Morrison,

BC Food Systems Network

Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty

C/O 555 East 55th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C, V5X 1N6
Mobile: 778.879.5106
Email: dmo6842@gmail.com
Website: www.indigenousfoodsystems.org

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Upcoming Workshops and Volunteer Opportunities with the Indigenous Health Garden

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Upcoming Workshops and Volunteer Opportunities
  • Wednesday March 3rd, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Wednesday March 9th, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Wednesday March 16th, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Wednesday March 24th, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Thursday March 31st, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Tuesday March 29th: Feast Bowl community meal hosting the Longhouse Student Lunch (info session about Indigenous Programs at UBC Farm)

How to volunteer for garden sessions: we work in the garden rain or shine, so come dressed for the weather. We have extra rain boots, gardening tools, and gloves to share. Bring a snack and water bottle – bring friends and family (of any age) too! No experience necessary. You will find us in the Indigenous Health Garden at the UBC Farm. The most up-to-date directions to the UBC Farm can be found here. Once at the Farm, you can follow the “Aboriginal Health Gardens” signs or follow this map to find our garden.

How to volunteer for the Feast Bowl: if you are new to the Feast Bowl, please fill out our volunteer sign-up form online so we can get to know you a bit better! Join us at the UBC First Nations Longhouse (1985 West Mall) at or after 9:30AM to help us harvest or cook, or 12:30PM to eat lunch with us. Extra help from any age or skill level is always appreciated, especially in the kitchen. If you can only join us for lunch, we encourage you to come anyway and we look forward to sharing a delicious meal with you!

Note: if you plan to bring a large group, please let us know ahead of time at hannah.lewis@ubc.ca.

Anishinaabe cook uses language to teach about traditional food

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By Waubgeshig Rice, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 4:28 PM ET

dan-kimewonDan Kimewon uses Anishinaabemowin to teach cooking and healthy living.

Diabetes epidemic among indigenous Canadians, say front-line workers
Culture night hits home at Ottawa’s Wabano Centre
An Anishinaabe cook is using his indigenous language and knowledge of traditional foods to teach people about culture and healthy eating at the Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Dan Kimewon, from Saugeen First Nation in southern Ontario, is in Ottawa this weekend to talk Anishinaabemowin (also known as the Ojibway language) with community members, lead cooking classes, and share his experiences of growing up with traditional Anishinaabe teachings about growing and preparing food.

Wabano
The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health’s community kitchen is a weekly event. (Waubgeshig Rice/CBC News)

“I’m here to teach about a healthy way of life, and how to cook in a healthy way,” said Kimewon, following a lesson with the Wabano diabetes program’s community kitchen, where people learn how to make healthy food options to manage diabetes.

He encourages people to move away from diets of processed and fast foods in hopes of curbing high rates of diabetes and obesity among indigenous people.

“We’ve got so many native people that are sick from this, and we’ve got to understand that,” he said.

Instead, he wants people to embrace more traditional indigenous foods like corn, also known as “mandamin” in Anishinaabemowin. He demonstrates how to prepare corn for soup and other meals in his presentations.

“[Corn] is a way of life of our people,” he said. “It never came from overseas. It’s from here. We’ve always had it.” Read More…

A ‘Really Cool Squash’ Makes A Comeback In Wisconsin After 800 Years

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A ‘Really Cool Squash’ Makes A Comeback In Wisconsin After 800 Years

Gete Okosomin Was Only Recently Discovered By Archaeologists
By Cheyenne Lentz
Friday, October 30, 2015, 2:05pm

Gete (GATE-ay) Okosomin (oh-COHS-suh-min) is Ojibwe for “really cool squash.” According to Kevin Schoessow  — an agricultural development agent with the University of Wisconsin-Extension — it’s the perfect name to describe an ancient kind of squash that was only recently discovered in Wisconsin.

“The story goes, about 10 years ago, there was an archaeological dig somewhere in the Green Bay area or in Menominee territory, and they found a clay vessel — a clay ball,” said Shoessow. “And they picked it up, and lo and behold, it had a little rattle.”

When the researchers cracked the ball open, Schoessow said, they found squash seeds within. They estimated that the ball had been preserving the seeds for about 800 years.

But perhaps even more remarkably, researchers also found that the seeds were still viable. Flash forward to today, and five generations of the squash known as Gete Okosomin have been produced.

Having been given one of the fruit as a gift from the Lac Courte Oreilles tribe, Schoessow likened the flavor to that of an acorn squash, but much sweeter. The shape, he said, is similar to that of a banana squash.

“The one I had was only six-and-a-half pounds, but they grow closer to 18 or 20 in the first generation,” Schoessow said.

The seeds thus far have been shared with just a select few in order to protect indigenous culture and foods, he said. However, people will soon be able to see the squash on display at the Teaching and Display Garden at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station.

“We really just want to kind of just honor the heritage of this particular squash,” Schoessow said. “There’s a lot of cool heirloom varieties that we need to bring back and that’s exactly what we’re trying to do with this one.”

Notably, the All-America Selections organization recently awarded the Spooner research station second place in the National Landscape Design Contest. Read more about the station’s garden here.

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Bannock, poutine, indigenous harvest: the power of food to connect cultures, community

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Sunday October 18, 2015

Bannock, poutine, indigenous harvest: the power of food to connect cultures, community

Neechi Foods in Winnipeg offers a range of traditional foods in its restaurant and grocery store.

Neechi Foods in Winnipeg offers a range of traditional foods in its restaurant and grocery store. (Neechi Foods/Twitter)

Listen to Full Episode 40:59

It’s autumn, the season of crunchy leaves, cool days and grandma sweaters. In indigenous communities it’s also harvest time.

Back home in the north, moose hunting is underway. In the south wild rice or manoomin is being prepared and packaged and on the coastlines people are fishing up for winter.

So what better time to talk about food?

  • On the show this week, our senior bannockologist, Tim Fontaine, digs into a Winnipeg co-op that serves up traditional food and economic development.
  • You’ll find out what happened when the indigenous people of Sweden stopped in at a Cree community in Quebec and had some poutine.
  • Artist KC Adams spent a month eating only foods that are indigenous to North America. Hear the personal reason that motivated her to make the change.
  • Seal intestine is being served up to guests in Labrador. Find out what else is on the menu at the Torngat Mountains Base Camp.
  • And some theatre with your dinner? HUFF playwright and actor Cliff Cardinal explains why he uses the stage to shed light on some very dark topics.