genocide

Interactive map by University of Georgia historian shows U.S. appropriation of over 1.5 billion acres Indigenous land, 1776-1887

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This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations.  (Above is a GIF of the map’s time-lapse display; visit the map’s page to play with its features.)

The project’s source data is a set of maps produced in 1899 by the Bureau of American Ethnology. The B.A.E. was a research unit of the Smithsonian that published and collected anthropological, archaeological, and linguistic research on the culture of North American Indians, as the nineteenth century drew to a close.

While the time-lapse function is the most visually impressive aspect of this interactive, the “source map” option (available on the map’s site) offers a deep level of detail. By selecting a source map, and then zooming in to the state you’ve selected, you can see details of the map used to generate that section of the interactive. A pop-up box tells you which Native nation was resident on the land, and the date of the treaty or executive order that transferred the area to the government, as well as offering external links to descriptions of the treaty and of the tract of land.

In the site’s “About” section (reachable by clicking on the question mark), Saunt is careful to point out that the westward-moving boundaries could sometimes be vague. Asked for an example, he pointed me to the 1791 treaty with the Cherokee that ceded the land where present-day Knoxville, Tenn. stands. The treaty’s language pointed to landmarks like “the mouth of Duck river,” a broad approach that left a lot of room for creative implementation. When dealing with semi-nomadic tribes, Saunt added, negotiators sometimes designated a small reservation, “rather than spelling out the boundaries of the cession.” Read more…

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Mexican Indigenous Ask Pope to Apologize for Mass Genocide

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Mexican Indigenous Ask Pope to Apologize for Mass Genocide


The Supreme Indigenous Council of Michoacan, Mexico, accused the Catholic Church of being complicit in the killing of over 24 million Indigenous people.

Some 30 Indigenous communities of Michoacan, Mexico, have released a statement demanding Pope Francis apologize for the genocide committed with the complicity of the Catholic Church against their people during the Spanish invasion of the Americas in the 16th century.

"For over 500 years, the original people of the Americas have been ransacked, robbed, murdered, exploited, discriminated and persecuted,” the Supreme Indigenous Council of Michoacan said in a statement.

    In 2015, Pope Francis "issued a sweeping apology for crimes of the Church against the indigenous during the conquest of the Americas." — ¡Gabe! Ortíz (@TUSK81) February 6, 2016

    #Vatican spokesman says Pope Francis means to give blessing to use of indigenous languages at Catholic masses in Mexico — Joshua McElwee (@joshjmac) February 5, 2016

“Within this framework, the Catholic Church has historically been complicit and allies of those who invaded our land,” they added.

Various Purepechas communities from Michoacan demanded that the pope make a public statement apologizing for the church's role in the genocide and ongoing disappearance of the Indigenous people of Mexico.

The council also denounced that with weapons and the help of Catholic missionaries, a culture, language, religion and other European values were imposed on the people of Mexico.

"The Bible was the ideological weapon of the Conquerors,” they added ahead of the pope's visit to Mexico, which begins Feb. 12.

The Spanish intervention and invasion of the Americas represents one of the biggest acts of genocide in history, they said.

“The arrival of the Europeans meant the interruption and destruction of various original civilizations, which had their unique ideas and concepts of the world, our own government, writings, languages, education, religion and philosophy,” the statement added.

The “European invaders” caused the death of 95 percent of the the total Indigenous population within 130 years after the unfortunate arrival of Christopher Columbus and Hernan Cortes, the council noted.

They highlighted that before the Spaniards arrived to the Mexican region, there were about 25.2 million Indigenous people, and that after 1623, less than 700,000 were left.

The pope is scheduled to visit Morelia, the capital of Michoacan, Feb. 16.

Last year, First Nations people also demanded the pope apologize for the genocide committed by colonization. 

This content was originally published by teleSUR at the following address: 
 "http://www.telesurtv.net/english/news/Mexican-Indigenous-Ask-Pope-to-Apologize-for-Massive-Genocide-20160207-0033.html". If you intend to use it, please cite the source and provide a link to the original article. www.teleSURtv.net/english

Jan 22-24, 2016: STAND Conference – Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

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Learn, Listen, Act: Promoting Reflexivity to Genocide of Indigenous Peoples

About the Conference

In light of the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report published in June 2015 regarding the cultural genocide of First Nations peoples, STAND is looking to reorient itself toward domestic issues related to genocide in addition to our international advocacy focus. This conference will convene STAND Canada’s national leadership on the UBC campus, hosted by our UBC Chapter, for a robust dialogue on STAND’s future in relation to genocide on this land that will engage multiple stakeholders.

The objectives for this conference are open-ended as we listen through consultations, meetings, and events in an effort to understand our responsibility as a Canadian anti-genocide advocacy organization. As a result of the topic of focus, we are excited to build relationships with external allies and local Indigenous groups that may be interested in teaching us and working with us.

For more information, please view our Conference Summary.

Get Involved with the Conference

The Conference will be held from 9am – 8pm in Vancouver on January 22, 23, and from 9am – 2pm on January 24. There is no cost for attending the Conference.

We have organized two events open to the public. Please join us for the following events:

If you are interested in attending but do not have a Facebook account or you are bringing a guest, please email us or RSVP through Eventbrite to the film screening and Open Forum. We would like to ensure that our events meet room capacity numbers.

For any questions, please email us.

World Bank Admits Link to Forced Evictions in Africa

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World Bank Admits Link to Forced Evictions in Africa

February 23, 2015

The World Bank has failed to properly enforce its environmental and social guidelines regarding Indigenous Peoples in Africa. According to a leaked report obtained by  the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Bank knew there was an “operational link’’  between its funding for an Ethiopian development initiative and the forced evictions of thousands of Indigenous Peoples.

Over the last decade, the World Bank created a health and education initiative that galvanized about $2 billion in funds. Members of the Indigenous Anuak people in Ethiopia’s Gambella region declared that the Ethiopian government was using some of the World Bank’s money in a program that supported forced evictions and allowed soldiers to beat, rape and kill Anuak people who refused to leave their homes.

Cultural Survival’s 2012 campaign successfully urged the governments of the US and UK, donor nations to Ethiopia, to recognize this link and pull funding for the projects that lead to the removal of Indigenous Peoples from their lands.  The campaign highlighted the Anuak people’s forced removal to state-created villages, and how those who refused to leave their lands were met with violent attacks, rape, and torture.

According to a leaked watchdog report, The World Bank’s internal Inspection Panel admitted that there was an “operational link” between the World Bank-funded program and Ethiopian authorities’ eviction actions. The Ethiopian government has argued that the forced removal of Indigenous Peoples and the creation of villages, known as the “villagization” program, was designed to provide access to basic socio-economic infrastructures like food, healthcare, and educational facilities to the people who are being relocated and to bring “socio-economic & cultural transformation of the people.” Under this program, the Ethiopian government forcibly relocated approximately 70,000 Indigenous People from the Gambella region to new villages that actually continue to lack basic necessities and minimum health standards. The Bank’s failure to publicly acknowledge this “operational link” and to ensure the protection of affected communities means the World Bank violated its own policies based on project appraisal, risk assessment, financial analysis and protection of Indigenous Peoples, concludes the report. …Read More.

Video: Watch Colorado Governor’s Sand Creek Apology

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Video: Watch Colorado Governor’s Sand Creek Apology

12/17/14
Hickenlooper Sand Creek Apology
CATV 47
Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper offered an apology for what happened at the Sand Creek Massacre.
 

Cheyenne and Arapaho Television (CATV 47) was on hand for the 150th commemoration of the Sand Creek Massacre and documented the moment on December 3 when Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper offered an apology while standing on the steps of the state capitol.

“Today we gather here to formally acknowledge what happened, the massacre at Sand Creek,” he begins. “We should not be afraid to criticize and condemn that which is inexcusable, so I am here to offer something that has been too long in coming, and on behalf of the State of Colorado, I want to apologize.”

He recognized the runners, who had completed the Sand Creek Massacre Spiritual Healing Run, and pointed out that the apology did not come lightly.

Watch the full video below:

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/12/17/video-watch-colorado-governors-sand-creek-apology-158325