graduate students

Graduate Programs: CTLT, Teaching Assistants Institute

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The TA Institute is open to any graduate student who is interested in teaching or TAing. The Institute includes sessions on teaching and learning theory, scholarship, classroom strategies, campus climate, and lesson design.

 

Design Thinking in Teaching

January 10, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

How do you design a successful lesson? This workshop will discuss common challenges in lesson planning and develop a toolkit of best practices and strategies. More info

 

Grad Student Mental Health

January 10, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Do you ever feel overwhelmed as a TA and feel like students can see right through you? In this workshop, we will address raising self-awareness on “impostor syndrome” and identify strategies for self-care and navigating teaching and life as a grad student. More info

 

Developing a SoTL Project

January 10, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This workshop will help you design a research project to evaluate the quality of teaching and learning in your course. Learn the fundamentals of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and create a blueprint for your very first SoTL project. More info

 

Metacognition, Lifelong Learning, and Disciplinary Practice

January 11, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

How can you help students become lifelong learners? This session will examine the idea of metacognition as a distinct and valuable practice in teaching and learning. More info

 

Transliteracies

January 11, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This workshop explores how TAs can develop safer, more trans-inclusive pedagogical practices in their various role(s) in the classroom and on campus. More info

 

Giving Guest Lectures and Presentations

January 11, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Learn more about guest lectures and presentations, and design a toolkit to prepare for successful lectures or presentations. More info

 

Experiential Learning: Concept and its Application in Lesson Planning

January 12, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Explore the experiential learning cycle, its value in teaching contexts, and ways to integrate the model into your lesson planning and teaching. More info

 

Incorporating Results from SoTL

January 12, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This professional development workshop is open to grad students interested in learning more about Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. More info

 

Unsettling Group Guidelines

January 12, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Classroom guidelines are often used by educators with the intent to establish a “safe” learning environment. But others have argued that classroom guidelines sometimes fail to recognize and respond to issues of power and social position. More info

 

Thank You!

 

Elissa Morris
Events Assistant | Centre for Teaching Learning and Technology
The University of British Columbia | Vancouver
214-1961 East Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1 Canada
Phone 604 827 4871| elissa.morris@ubc.ca

http://www.ctlt.ubc.ca | @UBC_CTLT

 

 

CFP – Indigenous Expressions of Culture in Storytelling, Drama, Theatre and Performance – Traditional and Contemporary Canadian and Polish Upper Silesian Perspectives. Due: Dec 31, 2016

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A Conference Organized by the University of Silesia,  Poland  and the University of the Fraser Valley, Canada

April 26-28, 2017, University of Silesia, Sosnowiec campus

Second Call for Proposals

Indigenous Expressions of Culture in Storytelling, Drama, Theatre and Performance –Traditional and Contemporary Canadian and  Polish Upper Silesian Perspectives.

Confirmed Speaker: Tomson Highway (Cree)

“Storytelling is at the  core of decolonizing,  because it is a process of remembering, visioning and creating a just reality […] [it] becomes a lens through which we can envision our way out of cognitive imperialism” (Simpson 89)

The first of the intended series of conferences dedicated to the exploration of the complexity of Indigenous cultures of North America and minor cultures of Eastern/Central Europe – is a joint project of the Department of English and Indigenous Affairs Office, University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), Canada,  and the  Canadian Studies Centre, Department of American and Canadian Studies, Theatrum Research Group and the Centre for the Study of Minor Cultures at the University of Silesia (US),  Poland. As Canadian and Polish scholars and educators working in the fields of  Indigenous, minor, and transcultural literary and cultural studies, we propose that the first conference will explore the traditional and contemporary expressions of culture in Indigenous America,  specifically Canada, and in the Eastern/Central European territory of Upper Silesia, specifically Poland, with a primary focus on the  acts of resistance, survival and celebration of culture as enacted in storytelling, drama, theatre and performance (DTP). Performance is interpreted broadly including traditional and contemporary music and dance as well as festival events understood as modes of cultural storytelling. We envision the event as a meeting of Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars representing a variety of disciplines  and Indigenous Canadian and Upper Silesian storytellers, writers,  artists, performers,  educators and community members.

Our aim is to explore the richness of Indigenous expressions of culture in storytelling and DPT in Canada and Upper Silesia. We believe that the transcultural dialogue between scholars, artists and educators of marginalized cultures will be an enriching learning experience for all,  but especially for Upper Silesians, colonized by diverse powers throughout history, whose most recent struggle for recognition,  including the processes of cultural and linguistic revitalization, can benefit from such transcultural encounters.

The exploration of Canadian scholarship on Indigenous literatures and cultures, and especially the work of Indigenous playwrights, artists, performers, scholars/critics and educators is of great interest to the critics of minor/ Indigenous literatures and cultures in Europe. We believe that in spite of many differences between Indigenous cultures of America and minor cultures of Eastern/Central Europe, critical insights and analytical tools offered by Indigenous research methodologies, epistemologies and pedagogical theories  can provide instructive,  alternative ways of approaching the under-studied and under-theorized works of European minor/Indigenous writers, performers and artists. A panel discussion by specialists in this area will explore diverse perspectives on these complex issues.

Prospective participants are invited to submit proposals for traditional and non-traditional presentations that broadly address the theme of the conference. Submissions from graduate and postgraduate students at any stage of their research are welcome. The following list of topics should be regarded as neither exhaustive nor prescriptive:

  • Re-reading and re-writing of history in DTP
  • Poetics, aesthetics and politics of identity construction in DTP
  • Storytelling, drama, theatre and performance as tools of decolonization and pedagogy
  • Storytelling as a repository and archive of Indigenous knowledge
  • Interrogating the concept of indigeneity: theorizing indigenous and minor cultures perspectives
  • Indigeneity of Upper Silesia
  • Transindigeneity and a dialogue of cultures
  • Indigenous ontology, epistemology, axiology, and methodology and their translation into storytelling and DTP
  • Use of oral traditions, stories,  culture and history to promote activism
  • Inventing home through stories and performance: a decolonizing approach to DTP
  • Performing history and re-visioning of community memories DTP
  • The role of the storytelling and DTP in the cultural revival of Canadian Indigenous cultures
  • The role of the storytelling and DTP in the cultural revival of Upper Silesian culture and language
  • (De)Construction of cultural identity in storytelling and DTP
  • Traditional knowledge and values in storytelling and DTP
  • Indigenous/ local knowledge and traditional and contemporary expressions of culture
  • Performance of identity and  language recovery and revitalization
  • Language recovery and revitalization and identity construction
  • Methodological practices of Native Performance Culture (NPC) as a possible model for the Upper Silesian expressions of culture
  • Diversity of the traditional Indigenous forms of cultural expression in the contemporary Canadian Indigenous and Upper Silesian DTP
  • Theories of affect and the enactment of Indigenous cultures in storytelling and DTP
  • Traditional knowledge versus folklore and its performance
  • Folklore and theatre
  • The role of folklore in preserving Indigenous and minor cultures
  • The condition of ritual in theatre – Canadian Indigenous and Slavic perspectives
  • Contemporary storytelling methods in DTP
  • The poetics of place and aesthetic values
  • Poetic auto-creation and mythologizing of Indigenous cultures and landscapes
  • Indigenous values and cosmologies and their translation into DTP
  • Heritage tourism and storytelling
  • Cultural festivals and their role in preserving and inventing cultures

With a comparative project in mind, we are initiating new avenues of research related to the marginalized local/ indigenous/minor cultures of Eastern/Central Europe studied in the context of Indigenous cultures of North America. We hope this pioneering venture in will lead to a greater understanding of the Indigenous and minor cultures functioning within major dominant national narratives of Canada and Poland.

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE:

University of Silesia:                                         University of the Fraser Valley                                      

Eugenia Sojka

Aneta Głowacka                                            Michelle LaFlamme

Sabina Sweta Sen                                             Shirley Swelchalot Shxwha:yathel Hardman

Rafał Madeja

 

Deadline for abstracts:  December 31st 2016 ;

Notification of acceptance:  January 6th 2017

 

Please send proposals to: indigenoustheatre2017poland@gmail.com

 

Proposal submission address: 

(i) Individual proposals should be 250-300 words.

(ii) For panels, in English, or Polish, please send the title of the panel and a 250-word presentation explaining the overall focus together with a 250-300 word abstract for each participant.

(iii) Please attach a short bio to your conference paper proposal.

All files should be clearly marked with the applicants’ name. Please make sure the files are in the PDF format.

 

Registration fee: covering welcome reception, all conference materials, coffee breaks, and conference banquet.

  • $ 250 US – full time faculty
  • $125 US – students and part-time faculty

Publication: selected papers based on the conference presentations will be published in a refereed  monograph.

The conference website will be opened shortly.

 

 

 

 

CFP – Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism; 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium Currents of Resistance, Due: Jan 13, 2017

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CALL FOR PAPERS Due: January 13, 2017

6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium

Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism

April 13-14, 2017 UC Davis

 

We are pleased to announce the 6th Annual Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium, to be held on the UC Davis campus on April 13-14, 2017. We welcome proposals from current graduate students and tribal college students from across the globe whose research critically addresses the issues, concerns, and lives of indigenous peoples worldwide.

 

This year’s theme, “Currents of Resistance, Activism and Justice: Indigenous Responses to Neoliberalism” draws inspiration and guidance from the affirmation “Mni Wiconi” or “Water is Life,” a call heard and repeated across the globe in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux actively resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline. This and previous struggles continue to connect indigenous activists and allies around the causes of Native sovereignty, environmental protection, land reclamation, and justice for indigenous peoples who have been brutalized and criminalized for fighting for the right to exist. Like rivers meeting the sea, Native and non-Native currents of resistance, activism and justice are coming together, uniting our voices as we find each other. It is in this spirit of unity that we extend our call for papers across and beyond Turtle Island. Some of the questions we hope to explore during this year’s symposium include:

 

● What are decolonial and indigenized correctives for current globalized neoliberalism?

● How can we indigenize the voices of resistance and justice against the calls of moderation and modernization?

● How do indigenous peoples work together to create sacred spaces for intellectual metamorphosis?

● How do indigenous communities and allies come together to mobilize indigenous knowledge for change?

These and many other questions call upon the wisdom and efforts of our diverse communities and relatives.

 

Graduate students from all disciplines from universities worldwide are encouraged to participate in this international dialogue. Presentations should be 12-15 minutes in length.

Possible areas of interest may include (but are not limited to):

 

Arts/Artists/Creative Expressions

Performance/Theater

Activist/ Social Movements

Indigenous Methodologies/Interpretations

Colonization/Internal Colonization/Decolonization

Queer Theory

Survivance

Women/Gender/Sexuality

Community Development/Empowerment

Racial/physical/economic/political borders

Native American Studies Pedagogy

Culture/Language Preservations

Critical Theory/Philosophy/Worldviews

Animal Studies

Tourism and Native Communities

Representations in popular culture

Histories

Social media/technologies

Immigration

Literatures

Sovereignties/Autonomies

Structural Inequalities

 

Diverse presentation formats are encouraged:

● Paper or oral presentations

● Workshops

● Roundtables or panels

● Showcasing creative work

To submit your abstract, please click here.

Graduate Pathways to Success: Project Mgmt I – 2 Days

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Registration is now open for:
Foundations of Project Management I: A Team Based Approach (A Mitacs Step Workshop – 2 Days)

Tuesday and Wednesday, December 6 and 7 | 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (Note: students MUST commit to the two full days)

For further information or to register, visit www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/13345-foundations-project-management-i-team-based-approach-2-days

The direct registration link is https://community.grad.ubc.ca/gps/event/13345

 

Please visit the community.grad.ubc.ca forums for other graduate student opportunities including:
One-Time Only Course Offering: Leading the Way Towards a Low-Carbon Future. Graduate students from all departments welcome; commences January 2017. For more information see https://community.grad.ubc.ca/forum/3034  

Seminar course: The Trump Impact: Change, Challenges Responses  https://community.grad.ubc.ca/forum/3040

SPSS (Part 1) – Environment, Data Entry and One Variable Analysis Tues, Dec 6,  10 – 12 https://community.grad.ubc.ca/event/3020

Tips and Tricks for Formatting Your Thesis, Wed, Dec 7, 10:00 AM https://community.grad.ubc.ca/event/2948
Graduate Student Teaching Drop In, Wed, Dec 7, 1:30 PM https://community.grad.ubc.ca/event/2854
Writing Assignment and Assessment Design Workshop, Thurs, Dec 8, 9 – 12 https://community.grad.ubc.ca/event/3037

Citation Management using RefWorks, Thurs, Dec 8, 3:00 PM https://community.grad.ubc.ca/event/3021

 

Graduate Pathways to Success: Time Mgmt + Business Writing

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There is still space available in this week’s sessions:

Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer, Thurs, Sept 29, 9:00 – 4:30 PM, https://www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/15595-intellectual-property-technology-transfer

 

Registration is now open for:

Time Management (Mitacs)

Do you find yourself frequently running out of time on a project? Are impending deadlines making you anxious? In this workshop you will learn how to create achievable plans and schedules, based on project management best practices.

Tuesday, October 4 | 9:00 AM to 5.00PM

For further information or to register, visit https://www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/13349-time-management

Direct link community.grad.ubc.ca/gps/event/13349

Postdoctoral fellows may register at www.postdocs.ubc.ca/event/354-time-management

 

Business Writing for Today’s Professional (Mitacs)

No matter what field you’re working in, written communication is a critical part of your day-to-day duties. Regardless of your comfort or skill level, you can benefit from learning techniques to entice your readers and achieve your goals. This workshop will help all professionals hone their writing skills using proven techniques and processes.

Wednesday, October 5 | 9:00 AM to 5.00PM

For further information or to register, https://www.grad.ubc.ca/about-us/events/13372-business-writing-todays-professional. Direct link: https://community.grad.ubc.ca/gps/event/13372

Postdoctoral fellows may register at https://www.postdocs.ubc.ca/professional-development-events

 

Please visit the community.grad.ubc.ca forums and event calendar for other graduate student opportunities including:

What is Consulting? (Presented by the Boston Consulting Group), Oct 17, 5.00PM https://community.grad.ubc.ca/forum/2878

Free Learn to Teach Workshops hosted by the UBC CIRTL (Centre for Integration of Research, Learning and Teaching). https://community.grad.ubc.ca/forum/2875

Sharing your experiences using Open Access with the Library https://community.grad.ubc.ca/forum/2879

Upcoming Final Doctoral Examinations

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FRIDAY, 16 SEPTEMBER 2016 – 9:00AM – FIRST NATIONS LONGHOUSE, BOARDROOM, 1985 WEST MALL

Rhonda Elaine Elser
Department: Educational Studies
Aboriginal Parental Engagement in Calgary Catholic Schooling

WEDNESDAY, 28 SEPTEMBER 2016 – 12:30PM – ROOM 200

Sara Florence Davidson
Department: Language and Literacy Education
Following the Song of k’aad’aww (Dogfish Mother): Adolescent perspectives on English 10 First Peoples, Writing, and Identity

Job – Exam Invigilator, UBC Access & Diversity. Due: Aug 31, 2016

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UBC Access and Diversity — Vancouver, Canada
Job Type
Part Time (29 hrs/wk or less)
Job Description
Access and Diversity is seeking UBC students to invigilate exams for students with disabilities. As per UBC Policy #73, invigilators are part and parcel to removing barriers and providing equitable opportunities for students with disabilities writing exams. Invigilators are expected to treat all students with fairness, dignity, and respect, while maintaining exam procedures and protocols.

**Preference will be given to Masters and PhD students; however, undergraduate students who are not taking courses with exams are welcome to apply. **

Duties include: starting, monitoring, and ending exams for students with disabilities in private spaces or group settings; setting up adaptive and computer equipment for the exams; ensuring examinees adhere to UBC and Access and Diversity exam procedures; maintaining good communication with Exam Coordinators and other invigilators; compiling detailed and accurate records and incident reports. Access and Diversity invigilators must strictly adhere to the University’s regulations and procedures regarding exams.

Qualifications
These positions are open only to registered UBC students who are not currently taking courses with exams. A strong cover letter and submission of an unofficial transcript are required. Students taking courses with exams will not be considered. Successful candidates must be able to demonstrate the following:

* Friendly demeanor and strong interpersonal skills.
* Contributes to a positive team environment.
* Ability to work and remain calm while under stress.
* Effective written and oral communication. Successful candidates must have the ability to compose detailed reports using clear, concise business English.
* Outstanding attention to detail and ability to accurately follow procedures.
* Ability to exercise tact and discretion when handling sensitive and/or confidential matters.
* Punctuality and reliability essential.
* Ability to follow directions, work independently, and to work within a team environment.
* Flexible schedule and ability to commit to consistent shift availability: Average 12: hours/week.
*Must be available to take shifts between 7:30am and 10:00pm.
* Experience working with persons with disabilities, in education, or in a service-oriented environment are assets.

Job Location
Vancouver, Canada
Hours Per Week
5-30
Job Sector
Education, Training and Teaching
Job Nature
On-Campus (UBC Vancouver) Job
Salary / Wage
$16.16
Preferred Degrees/Disciplines
Applied Science/Engineering
, Computer Science/IT
, Science/Environment/Agriculture
, Health Sciences
, Arts/Social Sciences
, Business Administration/Commerce/Management
, Education/Teaching
, Human Kinetics/Kinesiology
, Law/Legal Studies
Additional Documents (preferred)
Cover Letter, Unofficial Transcript, Class Schedule
Experience Level
Current Students in an Undergraduate Program, Current Students in a Masters Program, Current Students in a Phd Program
Posted On:
August 05, 2016


Applications Accepted Until:
August 31, 2016