Guatemala

Quetzaltenango – Learn Spanish and volunteer in Guatemala

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INEPAS LOGO FINAL VECTICAL
 
Dear Sir/Madam,
 
We would like to invite the students / employees of your college / university / organization to enhance their learning, whilst experiencing life in Guatemala. Specifically, we are targeting:
·         those who want to learn Spanish with native speakers and other students alike
·         those who wish to combine this learning with voluntary work experience
·         gap-year students of any discipline seeking a voluntary internship within a development organization.
 
Briefly, INEPAS was founded in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala in 1994 as a self-sustaining non-profit organization. It is fully recognized by the Guatemalan government for performing a range of social, legal, and humanitarian projects within the framework of developing rural communities in and around Quetzaltenango. INEPAS functions solely with the help of national and international volunteers who offer their support, professional talent and work experience in diverse fields. 
INEPAS has received official recognition from UNESCO. Its first social project, the foundation and construction of a rural school in the Maya-K’iché community of Choquiac was designated by UNESCO as exemplary for other organizations that work on similar projects. INEPAS generates the necessary funds for its social aid programs through its Spanish language school, thus remaining self-sustaining and non-partisan. We offer a variety of options for individuals wishing to learn Spanish:
The Language Immersion Program: for those whose primary aim is to learn Spanish. 
This is tailored to meet the needs of the individual, comprising of structured, intensive one-to-one tuition daily. Daily socio-cultural activities are arranged according to the interests of the students, including visits to local villages, trips to areas of natural beauty, films, sports and conferences on various aspects of Guatemalan life.
The Service Learning Program: for those who wish to learn Spanish in the context of voluntary work.
Voluntary Internships: both in Social Projects and as an International Co-ordination Assistant. More information about these can be found on our website.
As a non profit-making organization, we rely heavily on independent sources of promotion and would therefore greatly appreciate your displaying of this letter, trifold and poster in an appropriate place. Thank you for taking the time to read this and in anticipation of your immensely important support.
If you would like to receive more information about our organization, please visit our website at www.inepas.org or contact us at info@inepas.org   
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Yours Sincerely,
 
María Antonieta Ixcoteyac Velásquez,
General Coordinator, INEPAS

 

Victory in the Release of Guatemalan Political Prisoner Rigoberto Juarez

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August 6, 2016

By Linda Ferrer

July 22, 2016 marked a day of victory, not only for Rigoberto Juarez Mateo, but also for the Indigenous Q’anjob’al Maya community in the municipality of Santa Eulalia, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. In a split decision made by Judges Yasmin Barrios, Patricia Bustamante, and Gerbi Sical, seven Ancestral Authorities, including Rigoberto Juarez, Domingo Baltazar, Ermitano Lopez Reyes, Sotero Adalberto Villatoro, Francisco Juan Pedro, Mynor Lopez, and Arturo Pablo were released from prison, five of whom were acquitted of all charges.

Sixteen months ago, Rigoberto Juarez, one of nine Ancestral Authorities, was detained for his advocacy against two private hydroelectric and mining companies, Hidra Energia and Hidro Santa Cruz, respectively, for their failing to comply and consult with Indigenous communities’ prior to accessing licensure for their projects. Posing a threat to their natural resources, land, and way of life, those who resisted the projects faced threats, coercion, and were sometimes kidnapped, raped, or even murdered. Rigoberto Juarez and Domingo Baltazar, two well-known Indigenous leaders, traveled to Guatemala City to file reports on these various human rights violations to the Department of Public Ministry and the United Nations Commission for Human Rights but both were arrested by police without warrant or charges. They were illegally imprisoned without due process on that day of March 23, 2015. Rigoberto Juarez was placed in High Risk Group A preventive detention center for false accusations in a series of crimes which the private companies claimed against them. Sixteen charges were then made against him, including public disturbances of peaceful demonstrations, kidnapping, and intent to commit crimes. However, the lack of evidence and factual grounds for the heinous charges that were made only indicate that the hydroelectric and mining companies, working with the Mayor and judicial system of Guatemala, strategically organized the persecution and arrest of the community leaders in order to remove their voice and actions from the resistance movement he had begun and committed to since 2008. Read more…

Women and Youth Fight for Freedom of Expression in Guatemala

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Women and Youth Fight for Freedom of Expression in Guatemala
March 16, 2015
On February 25, 2015 the Guatemalan National Police and the Public Ministry once again raided two community radio stations, this time in Chichicastenango, Quiche, a popular tourist destination. Radio Swan Tinamit and Radio Ixmukane both serve important audiences in Chichicastenango. Radio Swan Tinamit is mostly staffed by youth, and the topics they cover include the rights of Indigenous Peoples, youth participation in leadership, and Indigenous traditions, among others. Radio Ixmukane is mostly staffed by women, as the radio was founded as part of and is housed by Asociacion de Mujeres Ixmukane (Ixmukane Womens’ Association). Radio Ixmukane focuses on women’s rights, education on domestic abuse, and reproductive rights.
 
Persecution against community radio stations is an all too-common occurrence in Guatemala, and increasingly has been on the rise over the last two months… Read more.