health

Helpers needed – Elders & Knowledge Keepers program

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Indigenous Medicine

LEARNING OPPORTUNITY FOR INDIGENOUS STUDENTS

Vancouver Coastal Health’s Aboriginal Health Department has a pilot project opportunity! A select few will be given the opportunity to work alongside Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers. Traditional teachings tell us our Elders & Knowledge Keepers must always have Helpers for safety and so that the knowledge can be passed onto the next generation. We are looking for Indigenous students who would like to be Helpers for our Elders & Knowledge Keepers program.

The Helpers group will start small and then grow as we assess and make adjustments. The pilot project’s initial roll out will contain four adults, eight youth and two Traditional Elders. The adults will commit to a minimum of sixteen hours a month while the youth will commit to a minimum of four hours per month [The hours do have some flexibility].

The work of the Elder & Knowledge Keepers (KK) is very diverse at Vancouver Coastal health as noted below:

  • Use traditional ways to support Indigenous patients with their families in health care settings;
  • Provide cultural support to Indigenous patients and their families in crisis or at times of passing;
  • Provide cultural teachings and guidance at health authority meetings (addictions, mental health, DTES, youth, seniors, maternity, health care education, etc.);
  • Lead and provide cultural support to small groups in health care settings, such as Indigenous youth at the HOpe, or Indigenous seniors in long-term hospital care;
  • Share Indigenous teachings at meetings, conferences and workshops;
  • Provide openings/closings/land acknowledgments for Vancouver Coastal Health conferences/gatherings/events.

Description: Indigenous Medicine – VCH – Student Opportunities

Please contact Shawna.duncan@vch.ca for more information.

 

 

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Researcher targets ‘glaring’ gaps in indigenous health care

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Carrie Bourassa takes reins of Institute of Aboriginal People’s Health
010217_Carrie_Bourassa

Dr. Carrie Bourassa is the new scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health, which is based at Health Sciences North’s Research Institute. Supplied photo.

The “glaring” health gaps between indigenous people and the rest of Canada is widening, says the new scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health.

“It’s pretty bleak,” said Dr. Carrie Bourassa, who took over the position Feb. 1.

The institute is being established in Sudbury with the Health Sciences North Research Institute, where researchers are engaged in cutting-edge research on healthy aging, cancer care, infectious diseases, precision medicine and northern and Indigenous health. It’s the first time an Institute has been established outside of a large urban centre.

Bourassa’s role, among many others, will be to train and mentor new scholars in indigenous health research, and to make sure research creates opportunities to close those gaps.

“From diabetes to HIV and AIDS to suicide rates, we really need to get a handle on the underlying impact,” Bourassa said.

Most of the issues stem from the intergenerational trauma associated with the ongoing impact of colonization, she said. Researchers can’t seem to get a handle on the complex ways those underlying social detriments interact.

She said she knows the solution can be found in communities, because they are the ones who understand the issues better than anyone else. Read More…

 

Pickard, Aaron. Researcher targets ‘glaring’ gaps in indigenous health care. February 17, 2017. Retrieved from: https://www.sudbury.com/local-news/researcher-targets-glaring-gaps-in-indigenous-health-care-525752

Traditional Naming & Pole Raising Ceremony at the Indigenous Health, Research and Education Garden – 12pm – 3pm, 3 Oct 2016

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Please join us at the garden on Monday October 3rd from 12pm – 3pm for a Traditional Naming and Pole Raising Ceremony. We are honoured to grow medicines, learn, conduct research, and build community on the beautiful unceded territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people, and are grateful to announce that the Indigenous Health, Research and Education Garden will be receiving a traditional Musqueam name.

Funding: BC Council On Admissions & Transfer (BCCAT). Due: Sept 29, 2016

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Send on behalf of Dr. Robert Adamonski, Director of Research and Admissions: 

BCCAT is calling for research project proposals on Contemporary Issues in Student Mobility: http://www.bccat.ca/research/call

 
If you are interested in proposing a research project on a topic within the BCCAT mandate, please send a brief letter of intent by September 29, 2016 to Anna Tikina (atikina@bccat.ca). No need to wait until September to express interest – the letters of intent will be considered as they arrive. 
 
If you know someone who might be interested in proposing a project, please feel free to share this notice. 
 
Please do not hesitate to contact Anna (atikina@bccat.ca, or 604-412-7680) if you have questions about the Call. 

CFP – Conceptualizing Children & Youth Conference, Brock University. Due: April 28, 2016

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CALL FOR PAPERS

CONCEPTUALIZING CHILDREN AND YOUTH CONFERENCE

Brock University – October 12-14, 2016

Brock University’s Department of Child and Youth Studies announces “Conceptualizing Children and Youth”   a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary conference. All disciplines, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to research within Child and Youth Studies are welcome. The Conference will be held October  12-14, 2016 at Brock University in St. Catharines Ontario.

 

The conference will include keynote speakers, special evening events, networking opportunities, and graduate student events. There will be highlighted sessions on child and youth engagement in sport/performance; child and youth health/mental health; diverse children and youth; education contexts; Indigenous children and youth research; social issues facing children and youth; transdisciplinary in child  and youth research. There will also be additional dissemination opportunities.

 

To submit please complete the attached abstract form to dzinga@brocku.ca by April 28, 2016. Submissions may take the form of posters, individual papers, symposiums, or workshops.  Notification of results will be communicated by June 30, 2016.

 

Dawn Zinga, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Brock University 905-688-5550, ext.3152, Cairns 325

Indigenous Health Conference: Towards Health and Reconcilliation | May 26-27, 2016

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Indigenous Health Conference: Towards Health and Reconcilliation  |  May 26-27, 2016
May 26-27, 2016  |  Hilton Meadowvale, Mississauga ON
PRELIMINARY PROGRAM NOW AVAILABLE!
Our second Indigenous Health Conference will continue to explore the systemic health issues Canada’s Indigenous peoples face.

Speakers will include:

  • Dr. Cindy Blackstock – Reconciliation Means Not Saying Sorry Twice: Remedying Contemporary Inequalities in First Nations Children’s Health and Wellbeing
  • Dr. Barry Lavallee – Removing Culture from Cultural Safety: Structural Challenges to Addressing Indigenous Health in Canada
  • Dr. Ian Mosby – Hunger, Human Experimentation and the Legacy of Residential Schools
PLUS don’t miss our job fair for health care providers who would like to work with Indigenous populations. You can also sponsor an elder or undergraduate student and help send them to the conference!
Register today!
Review conference details at www.cpd.utoronto.ca/indigenoushealth

 

‘Emotional competency’ can help struggling students, educator says

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Lee Brown says handling emotions is a skill kids need to learn just like any other subject in school

By A New Day, CBC News Posted: Mar 01, 2016 6:21 PM CT

A retired academic says teaching “emotional competency” in schools can help students with everything from overcoming childhood trauma to getting better grades.

Lee Brown is a retired academic from the University of British Columbia, co-author of The Sacred Tree and former director of the Institute for Aboriginal Health at UBC.

Lee Brown

Lee Brown says kids need to learn emotional skills from an early age. (Council of Yukon First Nations)

He’s one of the speakers at the Yukon First Nation Education Summit in Whitehorse. The focus this year is on cultural inclusion in public schools, supporting First Nation students in Whitehorse schools and building the relationship between the Yukon Department of Education and First Nations.

Brown says handling emotions is a skill kids need to learn, just like any other subject in school.

“Albert Einstein was a mathematical genius, but if he’d never studied math, he would never have been able to count to ten,” Brown said. “So, emotional competency is what develops when you put your mind in a curriculum from Grade 1 to 12 to develop the emotional skills of the children.”

Brown says teaching emotional competency involves helping students to understand their emotional states and how to communicate them. He says that helps students create strong identities for themselves.

Emotional skills can also help students tackle subjects they struggle with, Brown says, giving the example of math, which causes many students anxiety. He says it’s possible for students to train themselves to love math.

“The more emotional tools you have in your emotional toolbox, the better off you’re going to be.”

Brown says bullying, racism and suicide are results of failing to teach children about their emotions.

“There’s not a high level of emotional maturity in our society,” he said. “There is a high level of emotional toxicity.”