history

Assistant Professor of Native American History, University of North Carolina – Pembroke

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The University of North Carolina at Pembroke invites applications for a tenure-track position in American Indian History. The position will be a the rank of Assistant Professor. The successful candidate will teach a variety of advanced courses in Native American history, contribute to the general education survey load in the department by offering a two-course introductory sequence in Native American history, and periodically teach an historical methods course. Of particular interest to us are candidates whose focus is on Native Americans of the Southeastern United States. Area of specialization within the field is open, but additional consideration will be given to those applicants who can develop courses with an emphasis on gender and sexuality. The new faculty member will join the History Department and have opportunities to collaborate with faculty in American Indian Studies as well as the Southeastern American Indian Studies Program. Applicants must earn a Ph.D. in History by August 2017. The UNCP History Department expects faculty to demonstrate a strong commitment to teaching and to be actively engaged in professional scholarship and university service.

Assistant Professor of Native History, Northern Arizona University

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The department of History at Northern Arizona University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of History specializing in Native /Indigenous North America.  The appointment begins fall of 2017.  In keeping with the department’s mission, we are looking for a colleague who demonstrates the ability to undertake teaching and scholarship focusing on indigenous histories in a global context.  The successful candidate will be expected to offer courses in Native American/Indigenous history at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and contribute to other courses required by the department for its majors.  Preference will be given to scholars whose research and teaching can also contribute to the department’s thematic strengths at the graduate level, which at present include Global/Comparative history; Environment & Health; Colonialism and Nationalism; Class, Race, & Ethnicity; Gender & Sexuality; and Public History.

 

 

Interactive map by University of Georgia historian shows U.S. appropriation of over 1.5 billion acres Indigenous land, 1776-1887

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This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations.  (Above is a GIF of the map’s time-lapse display; visit the map’s page to play with its features.)

The project’s source data is a set of maps produced in 1899 by the Bureau of American Ethnology. The B.A.E. was a research unit of the Smithsonian that published and collected anthropological, archaeological, and linguistic research on the culture of North American Indians, as the nineteenth century drew to a close.

While the time-lapse function is the most visually impressive aspect of this interactive, the “source map” option (available on the map’s site) offers a deep level of detail. By selecting a source map, and then zooming in to the state you’ve selected, you can see details of the map used to generate that section of the interactive. A pop-up box tells you which Native nation was resident on the land, and the date of the treaty or executive order that transferred the area to the government, as well as offering external links to descriptions of the treaty and of the tract of land.

In the site’s “About” section (reachable by clicking on the question mark), Saunt is careful to point out that the westward-moving boundaries could sometimes be vague. Asked for an example, he pointed me to the 1791 treaty with the Cherokee that ceded the land where present-day Knoxville, Tenn. stands. The treaty’s language pointed to landmarks like “the mouth of Duck river,” a broad approach that left a lot of room for creative implementation. When dealing with semi-nomadic tribes, Saunt added, negotiators sometimes designated a small reservation, “rather than spelling out the boundaries of the cession.” Read more…

Job – Musqueam Indian Band: Musqueam Historical Timeline Project Assistant. June 17, 2016

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The Musqueam Indian Band (MIB) and the University of British Columbia – Vancouver Campus (UBC) are seeking a motivated UBC student to work as a Musqueam Historical Timeline Project Assistant. The Project Assistant will play a key role in the development and delivery of the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) grant “Developing a UBC-Aboriginal Timeline with Musqueam content – Time and Place at UBC: Our Histories and Relations” (More information). As part of the TLEF project team, comprising partners from MIB and UBC, the Project Assistant will work to enhance the Time and Place at UBC: Our Histories and Relations (http://timeandplace.ubc.ca ) digital timeline by creating a new line with the history of the Musqueam Nation, including the community’s relationship with UBC.

Employment date: late June 2016 – April 2017, requiring an average of 10 – 12 hours/week

Application deadline: June 17, 2016 at 4:00PM

Apply with résumé and cover letter to: Musqueam Indian Band, Human Resources, 6735 Salish Drive, Vancouver, BC, V6N 4C4, Fax: (604) 263-4212, e-mail jobs@musqueam.bc.ca

Information: http://fnis.arts.ubc.ca/2016/06/03/jobb-opportunity-musqueam-historical-timeline-project-assistant

Musqueam Post dedicated at UBC Vancouver campus

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Musqueam artist Brent Sparrow Jr. carved the new Musqueam Post during UBC’s Centennial year. Photo credit: Reese Muntean

The Musqueam people and the University of British Columbia acknowledged their developing partnership today with the dedication of a striking cedar post installed prominently on the Point Grey campus, which is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people.

Carved by talented Musqueam artist, Brent Sparrow Jr., the post tells an origin story of the Musqueam involving a two-headed serpent.

“We cherish the relationship between the university and the Musqueam,” said Musqueam Chief Wayne Sparrow. “As UBC is on our traditional territory, it’s important that we work together closely to share our culture and look for opportunities to work together.”

The new Musqueam post is now installed, facing east towards the new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre and the campus entrance, at the foot of a cascading water feature at University Boulevard and East Mall.

“This beautiful post will serve as a permanent welcome to all visitors to these grounds and as a reminder of our relationship with the Musqueam people who were here long before UBC’s history began,” said Interim President Martha Piper. “Its dedication, one of the closing events of UBC’s Centennial year, points towards renewed—and stronger—relationships in the future.”

The land upon which UBC and the post are situated has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, where culture, history, and traditions have been passed from one generation to the next.

A time-lapse video of the installation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/1ii_DjN1kz8

A photo gallery of the creation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: http://100.ubc.ca/galleries/musqueam-post/

For more on the post and the history of the Musqueam-UBC relationship, see http://centennial.aboriginal.ubc.ca

For more about partnership between the Musqueam and UBC, including academic courses and youth programs, visit: http://aboriginal.ubc.ca/community-youth/musqueam-and-ubc/

Brent Sparrow Jr. speaks about the Musqueam Post:

“This qeqən (post) tells the story of the origin of our name xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). The old people spoke of a small lake called xʷməm̓qʷe:m (Camosun Bog) where the sʔi:ɬqəy̓ (double-headed serpent) originated. They were warned as youth to be cautious and not go near or they would surely die. This sʔi:ɬqəy̓ was so massive its winding path from the lake to the stal̕əw̓ (river) became the creek flowing through Musqueam to this day. Everything the serpent passed over died and from its droppings bloomed a new plant, the məθkʷəy̓. For this reason the people of long ago named that place xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam – place of the məθkʷəy̓)

This qeqən represents our xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) ancestors and our ongoing connection to them and this land through their teachings. The figure is holding the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s tail to showcase this sχʷəy̓em̓’s (ancient history) passage through generations, relating how we became known as xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people – People of the məθkʷəy̓ plant. The scalloping reflects the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s path and trigons represent the unique məθkʷəy̓ plant. The sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s stomach is said to have been as big as a storage basket, designed here as an oval. I drew upon these traditional design elements to depict this rich history.”

Significant Musqueam-UBC milestones

1927: A pair of Musqueam house posts are presented to UBC: http://100.ubc.ca/timeline/musqueam-house-posts-are-presented-to-ubc/

1993: The First Nations Longhouse, built in consultation with Musqueam and many other Aboriginal groups, opens as a gathering place for Aboriginal students and a place of learning for people from the broader community.

2006: The University of British Columbia and the Musqueam Indian Band sign a historic memorandum of affiliation to further the sharing of knowledge and the advancement of Musqueam and Aboriginal youth and adults in post-secondary education.

Call for Submissions: Gatherings-Water project. Deadline EXTENDED TO MARCH 15, 2016

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Theytus Books is please to announce the Gatherings-Water project and a call for writing submissions from B.C. based Indigenous Youth on the theme of water. The Gatherings-Water anthology will be published in November 2015 and those writings chosen by an editorial committee will be featured in the book as well as receiving an honorarium and complementary copy.

This special book marks the return of the Gatherings anthologies that were a mainstay of Theytus Books’ publishing program for a decade. In addition to the anthology, there will be community engagement writing workshops in four B.C. Indigenous communities (locations and dates to be announced) blogs on the Gatherings-Water website and news and links to issues vital to the importance and future of Water in the B.C. region.

The Gatherings-Water project reflects the cultural rejuvenation of Indigenous Youth in B.C. It is not only a revival of a respected anthology series, but also a new level of engagement between publishing house and community, between established writers and emerging voices, and finally a testament to the connection of Indigenous Youth with the life-sustaining power of water.

This call for submissions is open to Indigenous Youth in the province of B.C., 30 years of age and younger.

Submissions can be prose, poetry, nonfiction or based on legends or teachings. Submissions should not exceed 3,000 words.Email your submission as a .jpg, .pdf, or .docx with a short biography of yourself to publisher@theytus.com. Please include 2-3 lines about your submitted work and what water means to you.

Submissions deadline EXTENDED TO MARCH 15, 2016

For more Information:

Publisher: Dr. Gregory Younging 250-493-7181 Ext. 2249 publisher@theytus.com

Theytus Books Ltd. gratefully acknowledges the support of the First Peoples’ Cultural Foundation in making ‘Gatherings ~ Water’ possible.

Public Open House: Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre & Library Garden. 11:30am-2:30pm, Feb 23, 2016

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Campus and Community Planning is hosting an Open House to welcome views and comments on plans for the Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre, a 620 square meter, two-level facility providing exhibition and program space to promote learning and dialogue regarding Indian Residential Schools in Canada, and the Library Garden, a remodel of the current garden to complement the new Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre.

Tuesday, February 23, 11:30 AM2:30 PM
Foyer, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, 1961 East Mall

If you cannot attend the Open House, comments may be submitted through the above project webpages or to the contact noted below by March 1, 2016.

Direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager, Development Services: karen.russell@ubc.ca or 604-822-1586.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 15, 2016