history

Summer Course: Place-based learning in Huu-ay-aht Territory

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Summer Course: Place-based learning in Huu-ay-aht Territory

This intensive two-week course (Jul 24 to Aug 4) offered by the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre will give undergraduate and graduate students an opportunity to engage directly in the emerging realm of place-based learning. The course is structured around foundational questions, such as, “How are people and place connected in ecologically unique landscapes?” and “What can we learn from the relationship between land, water, history, and contemporary revitalization efforts in the region?” Instructor: Dr. Tracy L. Friedel (UBC).

On-campus info sessions:

Wed, Feb 3, 5 – 6:30 PM, Room BIOL 2200
Thur, Feb 4, 5 – 6:30 PM, Room BUCH B210

For more information, email Meylin Zink Yi or call 604-728-3256.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 1, 2016

Job – US History: Native American History. Due: Feb 1, 2016

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Job Announcement: Native American History

The Department of History at California State University, Sacramento invites applications for a probationary, tenure-track Assistant Professor in U.S history with a specialization in Native American history in the period up to 1877 to begin Fall 2016.

The successful candidate must be able to teach the first half of the lower-division U.S. history survey, upper-division courses in Native American history, and other courses in the area of specialization, including graduate seminars. Additional position requirements: engage in research and scholarly activity related to Native American history, supervise undergraduate and graduate research, advise history majors, serve on department, college, and university committees, and advance university engagement with the community.

The PhD in History or a related field must be completed by August 15, 2016. Experience as a university-level instructor is desirable. Applicants should demonstrate ability to communicate effectively with a diverse undergraduate and graduate student population and the potential for teaching and research excellence. California State University, Sacramento has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity in all areas. We consider qualified applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, genetic information, medical condition, marital status, veteran status, or disability.

Review of applications will begin February 1, 2016; position open until filled.

Applications are only accepted through the Sacramento State job website located at http://www.csus.edu/about/employment/. Click on the “External Applicants” link titled “Faculty, Staff and Management Opportunities at Sacramento State.” Complete instructions for the electronic application are found at the link labeled “Instructions.”

Candidates must upload the following attachments with the electronic application:

1. A cover letter indicating teaching and research qualifications.
2. Curriculum vitae.
3. Writing sample.
4. Graduate transcripts (unofficial accepted, official required for interview).
5. Sample syllabi and teaching evaluations, if available.

Candidates must also have three (3) recent letters of recommendation sent by regular mail to: Chair, Native American History Search Committee, Department of History, California State University, Sacramento, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA  95819-6059.

For questions about the position or application procedure, contact the Department Chair, Dr. Aaron Cohen, by email at cohenaj@csus.edu. Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Clery Act statistics available.

Job – Assistant Professor, Native American History, (tenure track) California State University, Sacramento

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CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
6000 J Street, Sacramento, California 95819-6059 Phone: (916) 278-6206 • Fax: (916) 278- 7476

Job Announcement: Native American History

The Department of History at California State University, Sacramento invites applications for a probationary, tenure-track Assistant Professor in U.S history with a specialization in Native American history in the period up to 1877 to begin Fall 2016.

The successful candidate must be able to teach the first half of the lower-division U.S. history survey, upper-division courses in Native American history, and other courses in the area of specialization, including graduate seminars. Additional position requirements: engage in research and scholarly activity related to Native American history, supervise undergraduate and graduate research, advise history majors, serve on department, college, and university committees, and advance university engagement with the community.

The PhD in History or a related field must be completed by August 15, 2016. Experience as a university- level instructor is desirable. Applicants should demonstrate ability to communicate effectively with a diverse undergraduate and graduate student population and the potential for teaching and research excellence. California State University, Sacramento has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity in all areas. We consider qualified applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, genetic information, medical condition, marital status, veteran status, or disability.

Review of applications will begin February 1, 2016; position open until filled.

Applications are only accepted through the Sacramento State job website located at http://www.csus.edu/about/employment/. Click on the “External Applicants” link titled “Faculty, Staff and Management Opportunities at Sacramento State.” Complete instructions for the electronic application are found at the link labeled “Instructions.”

Candidates must upload the following attachments with the electronic application:

1. A cover letter indicating teaching and research qualifications.
2. Curriculum vitae.
3. Writing sample.
4. Graduate transcripts (unofficial accepted, official required for interview).

5. Sample syllabi and teaching evaluations, if available.

Candidates must also have three (3) recent letters of recommendation sent by regular mail to: Chair, Native American History Search Committee, Department of History, California State University, Sacramento, 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95819-6059.

For questions about the position or application procedure, contact the Department Chair, Dr. Aaron Cohen, by email at cohenaj@csus.edu. Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Clery Act statistics available.

Job – Assistant Professor in Native American History (tenure track), University of Massachusetts, Boston

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Assistant Professor in Native American History
Department of History
University of Massachusetts Boston
The History Department of the University of Massachusetts Boston welcomes applicants for a position as tenure-track assistant professor in Native American history beginning September 1, 2016.
We seek candidates who will take advantage of our setting in coastal urban New England to forge intellectual projects or community engagement.  Area of research specialization is open, but we are interested in candidates who study the 16th-19th centuries, with expertise in regions east of the Mississippi, U.S./Canada borderlands, or Maritime studies.  Candidates who work in gender history, history of health and medicine, environmental history, digital history, oral history, or comparative textual traditions will complement existing strengths.
Requirements
Successful candidates will show evidence of dynamic and effective teaching, an active research agenda, and the organizational or community-building skills to develop our Native American and Indigenous Studies Program. Successful candidates will have completed a Ph.D. in History or a closely related field by August 31, 2016.
Additional Information
The University of Massachusetts Boston provides equal employment opportunities to all employees and applicants for employment without regard race, color, religion, gender, gender identity or expression, age, sexual orientation, national origin, ancestry, disability, military status, or genetic information. In addition to federal law requirements, the University of Massachusetts Boston complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the university operates. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment.
Application Instructions
Review of applications will begin by Dec. 1, 2015, and will continue until the position is filled.
Candidates should provide a cover letter, curriculum vitae, statement of teaching experience and approach, sample of work of up to 30 pages, contact information for three letters of recommendation, and graduate transcripts online through the link available at
Please direct inquiries to the search committee chair at NatAmHistSearch@umb.edu.

 

CFP – 17th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference, Due: Oct. 15, 2015

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17th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference
February 4-­‐5, 2016 — Tempe, AZ

“Native Leadership in Community Building ”

“Native Leadership in Community Building,” is the theme for the 17th Annual American Indian Studies Association conference. With the many challenges native communities and nations are facing, leadership is key to community building. While political officials are seen as leaders, individuals and families are also taking the initiative to transform their native communities and nations for the better. These individuals and families are undertaking work on a number of levels, such as language and culture maintenance/revitalization, health improvement, environmental protection, culturally-­‐based education, and many other pertinent issues, that build strength and capacity in our communities.

This year’s conference looks to examine and initiate discussions about leadership and community building. This includes, however is not exclusive to: language, culture, art, history, environment, governance, gender, sexuality, health, storytelling, education, family, philosophy, policy, and all other topics which would include leadership and community building.

The organizers of the AISA Conference welcome proposals for paper presentations, panel presentations, round table discussions, and workshops.

Consideration will be given to other topics that relate to American Indian issues. Paper/Session/Panel Proposals:

  • Please send paper and panel submissions in a digital format.
  • When submitting a paper, session or panel, please provide the name of the presenter, title,

    session organizer and/or all persons involved, including their role/s. Also, provide their address,

    phone number and email information.

  • Submit the presentation title/s and a 200-­‐word paper abstract, describing the paper, session or

    panel.

  • Please submit proposals by October 15, 2015. Abstracts after this date will only be considered if

    space is available on the program.

    Thank you!

    Please send submissions to:

    Elizabeth P. Martos, Coordinator American Indian Studies
    P.O. Box 874603
    Arizona State University

    Tempe, AZ 85287-­‐4603 480-­‐727-­‐8691
    Email: elizabeth.martos@asu.edu

    PDF Announcement: 2016 CP 17th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference

Settler-Colonialism and Genocide Policies in North America – free public lecture by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz 27 Oct. 15, 7-9 pm

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“Settler-Colonialism and Genocide Policies in North America”

A free public lecture by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

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27 October, 2015

Location: 1400-1420 Segal Centre, SFU Harbour Centre.

Co-sponsored by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement, J.S. Woodsworth Chair in the Humanities, and First Nations Studies, and UBC’s First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies.

Governmental policies and actions related to Indigenous peoples, though often termed “racist” or “discriminatory,” are rarely depicted as what they are: classic cases of imperialism and a particular form of colonialism—settler colonialism. As anthropologist Patrick Wolfe has noted: “The question of genocide is never far from discussions of settler colonialism. Land is life—or, at least, land is necessary for life.” i The history of North America is a history of settler colonialism. The objective of government authorities was to terminate the existence of Indigenous Peoples as peoples—not as random individuals. This is the very definition of modern genocide. US and Canadian history, as well as inherited Indigenous trauma, cannot be understood without dealing with the genocide committed against Indigenous peoples. From the colonial period through the founding of states and continuing in the 21st century, this has entailed torture, terror, sexual abuse, massacres, systematic military occupations, removals of Indigenous peoples from their ancestral territories, forced removal of Native American children to military-like boarding schools, allotment, and policies of termination.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. Her grandfather, a white settler, farmer, and veterinarian, was a member of the Oklahoma Socialist Party and Industrial Workers of the World. Her historical memoir, “Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie,” tells that story. Moving to San Francisco, California, she graduated in History from San Francisco State University and began graduate school at the University of California at Berkeley, transferring to University of California, Los Angeles to complete her doctorate in History, specializing in Western Hemisphere and Indigenous histories. From 1967 to 1972, she was a full time activist and a leader in the women’s liberation movement that emerged in 1967, organizing in various parts of the U. S., traveling to Europe, Mexico, and Cuba. A second historical memoir, “Outlaw Woman: Memoir of the War Years, 1960-1975,” tells that story. In 1973, Roxanne joined the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the International Indian Treaty Council, beginning a lifelong commitment to international human rights, lobbying for Indigenous rights at the United Nations. Appointed as director of Native American Studies at California State University East Bay, she collaborated in the development of the Department of Ethnic Studies, as well as Women’s Studies, where she taught for 3 decades. Her 1977 book, “The Great Sioux Nation: An Oral History of the Sioux Nation,” was the fundamental document at the first international conference on Indians of the Americas, held at United Nations’ headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. Two more scholarly books followed: “Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico” and “Indians of the Americas: Human Rights and Self-Determination.” In 1981, Roxanne was invited to visit Sandinista Nicaragua to appraise the land tenure situation of the Mískitu Indians in the isolated northeastern region of the country. In over a hundred trips to Nicaragua and Honduras, she monitored what was called the Contra War. Her book, “Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War,” was published in 2005. “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States” was published by Beacon Press in September 2014.

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/714236692040031/

The history and significance of Kerr Dam for the Salish and Kootenai Tribes – July 29 – 2 pm to 4 pm

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You are invited to a conversation:

“The history and significance of Kerr Dam for the Salish and Kootenai Tribes”
Trosper%20talk

When: July 29 – 2 pm to 4 pm
Where: Forest Science Centre building 1613  2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC
Coffee and tea will be provided
The event may be recorded and shared on YouTube at a later date.

Everybody welcome – Please share with your social network!

Starting Sept. 5, 2015, The Salish and Kootenai Tribes will own and operate Kerr Dam, a 180 MW hydroelectric facility that controls the level of Flathead Lake, Montana.  Ronald Trosper, a tribal member, will summarize the history that led to this remarkable event, the first time an Indigenous Nation has acquired such a large dam on its reservation. With two subsidiary companies, Energy Keepers, Inc., and Mission Valley Power, the Tribes will control all electric generation and distribution on their reservation, with a substantial surplus to sell on the open market.

Dr. Ronald Trosper, Professor and former Head, American Indian studies, University of Arizona (earlier professor at Faculty of Forestry, UBC) and has been involved in the negotiations with the tribe to regain the control over this resource. He has agreed to come to UBC and deliver a talk about this.

http://www.forestry.ubc.ca/events/aboriginal-economics-and-the-case-of-kerr-hydroelectric-dam-by-dr-ron-trosper-a-real-experiential-story/