human rights

Morning Coffee and chat with Dr. Dustin Louie – Jan 11, 2017, 10:30-11:30 am

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You are invited to a SAGE morning coffee and chat with Indigenous scholar Dustin Louie, from the University of Calgary Faculty of Education.
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
10:30 to 11:30 am
Boardroom, First Nations Longhouse

 

It is a great chance to meet and chat about his work and maybe ask some questions about new scholar roles and responsibilities.

 

Following the coffee and chat, Dustin will be giving a talk at the Social Justice Institute in the Jack Bell Building on Indigenous girls and their over representation in sexual exploitation and sex trade. Please see attached poster.

2017-Jan11-DustinLouie.jpg

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Assistant Professor (tenure-track) of Social Justice and Carcerality, University of Colorado Boulder

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Assistant Professor of Social Justice and Carcerality
Area of Specialization:  tenure-track assistant professor position in Social justice and carcerality studies (an interdisciplinary field that examines confinement in settings such as prisons, reservations, and plantations; the social and cultural conditions leading to criminalization and imprisonment; and bodily coercion in border policing and human trafficking)
We are particularly interested in applications from scholars focusing on borderlands and Latinx or Chican@ populations, however, the area of specialization for this position is open.
Preferred Research Areas:  Race, gender, and prisons, border policing, and human trafficking, with a focus on Latinx  and comparative ethnic studies.
Tenure-track assistant professor position in social justice and carcerality studies (an interdisciplinary field that examines confinement in settings such as prisons, reservations, and plantations; the social and cultural conditions leading to criminalization and imprisonment; and bodily coercion in border policing and human trafficking) to begin in Fall 2017.
We are particularly interested in applications from scholars focusing on borderlands and Latinx or Chican@ populations, however, the area of specialization for this position is open.
In line with building our newly established Ph.D. program in Comparative Ethnic Studies, we welcome comparative, interdisciplinary, and intersectional approaches and innovative theoretical perspectives.
For job posting, and additional application information, please go to https://cu.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?job=06679&lang=en

 

Victory in the Release of Guatemalan Political Prisoner Rigoberto Juarez

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August 6, 2016

By Linda Ferrer

July 22, 2016 marked a day of victory, not only for Rigoberto Juarez Mateo, but also for the Indigenous Q’anjob’al Maya community in the municipality of Santa Eulalia, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. In a split decision made by Judges Yasmin Barrios, Patricia Bustamante, and Gerbi Sical, seven Ancestral Authorities, including Rigoberto Juarez, Domingo Baltazar, Ermitano Lopez Reyes, Sotero Adalberto Villatoro, Francisco Juan Pedro, Mynor Lopez, and Arturo Pablo were released from prison, five of whom were acquitted of all charges.

Sixteen months ago, Rigoberto Juarez, one of nine Ancestral Authorities, was detained for his advocacy against two private hydroelectric and mining companies, Hidra Energia and Hidro Santa Cruz, respectively, for their failing to comply and consult with Indigenous communities’ prior to accessing licensure for their projects. Posing a threat to their natural resources, land, and way of life, those who resisted the projects faced threats, coercion, and were sometimes kidnapped, raped, or even murdered. Rigoberto Juarez and Domingo Baltazar, two well-known Indigenous leaders, traveled to Guatemala City to file reports on these various human rights violations to the Department of Public Ministry and the United Nations Commission for Human Rights but both were arrested by police without warrant or charges. They were illegally imprisoned without due process on that day of March 23, 2015. Rigoberto Juarez was placed in High Risk Group A preventive detention center for false accusations in a series of crimes which the private companies claimed against them. Sixteen charges were then made against him, including public disturbances of peaceful demonstrations, kidnapping, and intent to commit crimes. However, the lack of evidence and factual grounds for the heinous charges that were made only indicate that the hydroelectric and mining companies, working with the Mayor and judicial system of Guatemala, strategically organized the persecution and arrest of the community leaders in order to remove their voice and actions from the resistance movement he had begun and committed to since 2008. Read more…

Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress. 10:30am–11:30am, Mar 11, 2016

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Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress

When: Friday, March 11, 2016  |  10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Where: Neville Scarfe Building, Room 310

 

k-sujathaThe Educational Administration & Leadership Program (EDAL, Department of Educational Studies), Indigenous Education, and the Faculty of Education Dean’s Office present a seminar by Professor K. Sujatha, Head, Department of Educational Administration, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi, India.

Tribes (Indigenous people) in India, who are also called Adivasis (Hindi for “original inhabitants”), constitute 8.9 percent (over 80 million) of the total population of the country and occupy the lowest levels in socio-economic development. There are more than 750 tribal groups with varied socio-cultural traditions. The Constitution of India envisages special measures for socio-economic development of tribes. Consequently both national and state governments have adopted several special policies and programmes for educational development of tribes. This presentation will cover several of these special policies and programmes — including residential schools — for the education of tribes, progress that is being made, and current issues and challenges.

Bio

Professor Sujatha holds a PhD in Educational Anthropology from Andhra University. She has been a Visiting Fellow at New England Univesity in Australia and has consulted with UNESCO, UNICEF, the British Council, the UN Development Programme, and the UN Office for Project Services. She has authored eight books in addition to research papers and articles published in national and international journals. Her specializations include education of disadvantaged groups, educational policy analysis, comparative education in developing countries, and school management.

The Human Rights of Aboriginal Children – Jan 21, 2016, 7 pm

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The Human Rights of Aboriginal Children

jk-plaque

When: Thursday, January 21, 2016  |  7 p.m.
Where: Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Boulevard

Keynote speakers:
  • Dr. Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, BC Representative for Children and Youth
  • Dr. Michael DeGagné, President and Vice-Chancellor of Nipissing University

“How to Love a Child”, the Janusz Korczak Lecture Series, is devoted to key issues crucial to the well-being and rights of children and young people today.

The goal of the lecture series is to foster conversations among academics, professionals and child advocates from diverse fields concerned with the welfare of the child. A range of disciplines and expertise including law, medicine, child welfare and education are represented in this series, and a variety of perspectives and issues will be addressed.
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“Annexed:” The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the UN Climate Change Conference 2015

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December 16, 2015

On December 12, 2015, after two decades of climate talks within the UN Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC), world leaders from 195 countries in Paris came to a consensus on a legally binding agreement on climate change, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2°C and reducing carbon emissions across the globe. The two-week long Conference of Parties (COP 21) process also brought together some of the world’s largest corporations, environmental and human rights organizations, and grassroots activists to hash out international energy goals, standards, and implementation. Over 250 Indigenous delegates were present and advocated for the inclusion of Indigenous rights in the Paris Agreement.
Hailed as “historic” and as “a turning point for the world,” the deal reached its goal to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change, yet disappointed many Indigenous Peoples due to its ultimate failure to include legally binding references to protecting Indigenous Peoples rights and their sovereignty.

Read More…

Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC, Nov. 4, 2015, 12-1pm

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Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC

On Wednesday, November 4th from 12-1pm will be Lecture by Dr. Sarah Hunt titled ‘Embodying Self-Determination: resisting violence’. In this talk, Sarah will argue that the erasure of trans and Two-Spirit people is an ongoing form of violence which is integrally connected to the violent manifestations of colonial heteropatriarchy in the lives of Indigenous women and girls. Across these sites and scales of gendered epistemic and material violence, Sarah will discuss the decolonial imperative to advance Indigenous gender-based analyses that foster the agency and self-determination of all our relations.

Where: the Liu Institute Multipurpose room. Lunch will be provided with an RSVP! However folks are welcome to attend even without an RSVP.

More information and RSVPs can be found at the link below: http://grsj.arts.ubc.ca/events/

Reference: Office of Graduate Programs and Research. NewsFlash #737, October 30, 2015

 

Folks are also encouraged to check out our Facebook Page at: https://www.facebook.com/Social-Justice-Institute-UBC-Events-512911055409313/timeline/

And tweet to @GRSJInstitute