human rights

Morning Coffee and chat with Dr. Dustin Louie – Jan 11, 2017, 10:30-11:30 am

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You are invited to a SAGE morning coffee and chat with Indigenous scholar Dustin Louie, from the University of Calgary Faculty of Education.
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
10:30 to 11:30 am
Boardroom, First Nations Longhouse

 

It is a great chance to meet and chat about his work and maybe ask some questions about new scholar roles and responsibilities.

 

Following the coffee and chat, Dustin will be giving a talk at the Social Justice Institute in the Jack Bell Building on Indigenous girls and their over representation in sexual exploitation and sex trade. Please see attached poster.

2017-Jan11-DustinLouie.jpg

Assistant Professor (tenure-track) of Social Justice and Carcerality, University of Colorado Boulder

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Assistant Professor of Social Justice and Carcerality
Area of Specialization:  tenure-track assistant professor position in Social justice and carcerality studies (an interdisciplinary field that examines confinement in settings such as prisons, reservations, and plantations; the social and cultural conditions leading to criminalization and imprisonment; and bodily coercion in border policing and human trafficking)
We are particularly interested in applications from scholars focusing on borderlands and Latinx or Chican@ populations, however, the area of specialization for this position is open.
Preferred Research Areas:  Race, gender, and prisons, border policing, and human trafficking, with a focus on Latinx  and comparative ethnic studies.
Tenure-track assistant professor position in social justice and carcerality studies (an interdisciplinary field that examines confinement in settings such as prisons, reservations, and plantations; the social and cultural conditions leading to criminalization and imprisonment; and bodily coercion in border policing and human trafficking) to begin in Fall 2017.
We are particularly interested in applications from scholars focusing on borderlands and Latinx or Chican@ populations, however, the area of specialization for this position is open.
In line with building our newly established Ph.D. program in Comparative Ethnic Studies, we welcome comparative, interdisciplinary, and intersectional approaches and innovative theoretical perspectives.
For job posting, and additional application information, please go to https://cu.taleo.net/careersection/2/jobdetail.ftl?job=06679&lang=en

 

Victory in the Release of Guatemalan Political Prisoner Rigoberto Juarez

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August 6, 2016

By Linda Ferrer

July 22, 2016 marked a day of victory, not only for Rigoberto Juarez Mateo, but also for the Indigenous Q’anjob’al Maya community in the municipality of Santa Eulalia, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. In a split decision made by Judges Yasmin Barrios, Patricia Bustamante, and Gerbi Sical, seven Ancestral Authorities, including Rigoberto Juarez, Domingo Baltazar, Ermitano Lopez Reyes, Sotero Adalberto Villatoro, Francisco Juan Pedro, Mynor Lopez, and Arturo Pablo were released from prison, five of whom were acquitted of all charges.

Sixteen months ago, Rigoberto Juarez, one of nine Ancestral Authorities, was detained for his advocacy against two private hydroelectric and mining companies, Hidra Energia and Hidro Santa Cruz, respectively, for their failing to comply and consult with Indigenous communities’ prior to accessing licensure for their projects. Posing a threat to their natural resources, land, and way of life, those who resisted the projects faced threats, coercion, and were sometimes kidnapped, raped, or even murdered. Rigoberto Juarez and Domingo Baltazar, two well-known Indigenous leaders, traveled to Guatemala City to file reports on these various human rights violations to the Department of Public Ministry and the United Nations Commission for Human Rights but both were arrested by police without warrant or charges. They were illegally imprisoned without due process on that day of March 23, 2015. Rigoberto Juarez was placed in High Risk Group A preventive detention center for false accusations in a series of crimes which the private companies claimed against them. Sixteen charges were then made against him, including public disturbances of peaceful demonstrations, kidnapping, and intent to commit crimes. However, the lack of evidence and factual grounds for the heinous charges that were made only indicate that the hydroelectric and mining companies, working with the Mayor and judicial system of Guatemala, strategically organized the persecution and arrest of the community leaders in order to remove their voice and actions from the resistance movement he had begun and committed to since 2008. Read more…

Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress. 10:30am–11:30am, Mar 11, 2016

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Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress

When: Friday, March 11, 2016  |  10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Where: Neville Scarfe Building, Room 310

 

k-sujathaThe Educational Administration & Leadership Program (EDAL, Department of Educational Studies), Indigenous Education, and the Faculty of Education Dean’s Office present a seminar by Professor K. Sujatha, Head, Department of Educational Administration, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi, India.

Tribes (Indigenous people) in India, who are also called Adivasis (Hindi for “original inhabitants”), constitute 8.9 percent (over 80 million) of the total population of the country and occupy the lowest levels in socio-economic development. There are more than 750 tribal groups with varied socio-cultural traditions. The Constitution of India envisages special measures for socio-economic development of tribes. Consequently both national and state governments have adopted several special policies and programmes for educational development of tribes. This presentation will cover several of these special policies and programmes — including residential schools — for the education of tribes, progress that is being made, and current issues and challenges.

Bio

Professor Sujatha holds a PhD in Educational Anthropology from Andhra University. She has been a Visiting Fellow at New England Univesity in Australia and has consulted with UNESCO, UNICEF, the British Council, the UN Development Programme, and the UN Office for Project Services. She has authored eight books in addition to research papers and articles published in national and international journals. Her specializations include education of disadvantaged groups, educational policy analysis, comparative education in developing countries, and school management.

The Human Rights of Aboriginal Children – Jan 21, 2016, 7 pm

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The Human Rights of Aboriginal Children

jk-plaque

When: Thursday, January 21, 2016  |  7 p.m.
Where: Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre, 6163 University Boulevard

Keynote speakers:
  • Dr. Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, BC Representative for Children and Youth
  • Dr. Michael DeGagné, President and Vice-Chancellor of Nipissing University

“How to Love a Child”, the Janusz Korczak Lecture Series, is devoted to key issues crucial to the well-being and rights of children and young people today.

The goal of the lecture series is to foster conversations among academics, professionals and child advocates from diverse fields concerned with the welfare of the child. A range of disciplines and expertise including law, medicine, child welfare and education are represented in this series, and a variety of perspectives and issues will be addressed.
Read more

“Annexed:” The Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the UN Climate Change Conference 2015

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December 16, 2015

On December 12, 2015, after two decades of climate talks within the UN Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC), world leaders from 195 countries in Paris came to a consensus on a legally binding agreement on climate change, with the aim of keeping global warming below 2°C and reducing carbon emissions across the globe. The two-week long Conference of Parties (COP 21) process also brought together some of the world’s largest corporations, environmental and human rights organizations, and grassroots activists to hash out international energy goals, standards, and implementation. Over 250 Indigenous delegates were present and advocated for the inclusion of Indigenous rights in the Paris Agreement.
Hailed as “historic” and as “a turning point for the world,” the deal reached its goal to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate change, yet disappointed many Indigenous Peoples due to its ultimate failure to include legally binding references to protecting Indigenous Peoples rights and their sovereignty.

Read More…

Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC, Nov. 4, 2015, 12-1pm

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Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC

On Wednesday, November 4th from 12-1pm will be Lecture by Dr. Sarah Hunt titled ‘Embodying Self-Determination: resisting violence’. In this talk, Sarah will argue that the erasure of trans and Two-Spirit people is an ongoing form of violence which is integrally connected to the violent manifestations of colonial heteropatriarchy in the lives of Indigenous women and girls. Across these sites and scales of gendered epistemic and material violence, Sarah will discuss the decolonial imperative to advance Indigenous gender-based analyses that foster the agency and self-determination of all our relations.

Where: the Liu Institute Multipurpose room. Lunch will be provided with an RSVP! However folks are welcome to attend even without an RSVP.

More information and RSVPs can be found at the link below: http://grsj.arts.ubc.ca/events/

Reference: Office of Graduate Programs and Research. NewsFlash #737, October 30, 2015

 

Folks are also encouraged to check out our Facebook Page at: https://www.facebook.com/Social-Justice-Institute-UBC-Events-512911055409313/timeline/

And tweet to @GRSJInstitute

Indigenous translation of UN Declaration of Human Rights

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 Indigenous translation of UN Declaration of Human Rights

ANU Researcher Dr Sarah Holcombe has translated the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights into the central-Australian language of Pintupi-Luritja. Image: Stuart Hay, ANU.

Thursday 22 October 2015

A researcher at The Australian National University (ANU) has translated the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) into the central-Australian language of Pintupi-Luritja, making it the first time the world’s most translated document has been made available in an Aboriginal language.

The translation of the document’s 30 articles and preamble took more than two years and involved working closely with Pintupi-Luritja translators and stakeholder groups.

Project Leader and social anthropologist Dr Sarah Holcombe said the process of translating the document was revealing.

“Very few Anangu people (Pintupi-Luritja speakers) had heard of universal human rights,” Dr Holcombe, from the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, said.

“Many were surprised at the fact that Aboriginal people are equal to all other people, because the fact is that is not the way they are treated.

“The articles about the rule of law, for example that all should be innocent until proven guilty and that the law should be treating all people equally, are apocryphal when applied to Aboriginal people in the Northern Territory.”

The UDHR was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948 as the first global expression of human rights. It has been translated into more than 460 languages.

Dr Holcombe said the UDHR was developed following the Second World War and was foundational to western law and culture.

“The mass atrocities after the Second World War horrified the world and there was wide recognition that there needed to be fundamental standards of human dignity,” she said.

“These standards are now in international law. They include the right to equality, freedom of religion, free speech, the right to vote and so on.

“Though we are the only western democratic country without a national bill or charter of rights, we are a signatory to the major international conventions that enshrine these rights.

“All these fundamental elements of our life that we all take for granted, are embedded in this document. It forms part of a contract of citizenship”.

“Yet, Aboriginal people, in remote areas especially, have not been widely exposed to this contract, as it exists in the mainstream. They don’t take rights for granted.”

Dr Holcombe said she hoped the new translation would help spread awareness of human rights in Indigenous Australia and begin a conversation in language.

“Anangu have a right to know this document exists. I want it to offer people possibilities. It was meant to be an educational document after all,” she said.

The project team working with Dr Holcombe were Lance Macdonald and Sheila Joyce Dixon (of Papunya) and linguist Ken Hansen.

Link to Pintupi translation of Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (279K PDF)

B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

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B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

THE CANADIAN PRESS OCTOBER 28, 2015
A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement. The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.
BELLA BELLA – A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement.

The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.

Hereditary Chief Harvey Humchitt says the First Nation has been collaborating with industry and senior governments on planning and economic opportunities, but without much progress on resource management decisions within its territories.

Chief Marilyn Slett says existing agreements will be honoured but the new approach will build a government-to-government relationship between the Heiltsuk, B.C., and Canada.

The First Nation relies on the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 Tsilhqot’in decision, that it says found a declaration of aboriginal title could be obtained through a negotiated agreement, or by court declaration.

Heiltsuk hereditary chiefs and elected leaders say as the sovereign authority over more than 35,000 square kilometres of the central coast, the First Nation has the right to control, manage and benefit from territorial resources.

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/first+nation+writes+declaration+title+rights+strategy/11474798/story.html#ixzz3q7YrYLXd

UN Human Rights Indigenous Fellowship Programme, Due: May 25, 2015

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United Nations Human Rights Indigenous Fellowship Programme

What is it?

The Indigenous Fellowship Programme (IFP) is a comprehensive human rights training programme that was established by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) in the context of the first International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples (1995-2004). The programme contributes to build the capacity and expertise of indigenous representatives on the UN system and mechanisms dealing with human rights in general and indigenous issues in particular, so they are in a better position to protect and promote the rights of their communities at the international level. Since the launch of the training programme in 1997, more than 300 indigenous men and women from all over the world have been trained. They provided human rights training to many more in their communities.

How does it work?

The IFP is accessible in four different languages: English, French, Spanish and Russian. The selected candidates are entitled to a return flight ticket, living expenses and basic health insurance for the duration of the training. The IFP is held annually and fellows from the 4 language components of the programme are trained together with simultaneous interpretation during 4 to 5 weeks in Geneva. The date of the training programme usually coincides with the annual meeting of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (June/July), thus allowing the fellows to participate more actively in that Mechanism. For more information on the sessions available in the training programme, please visit the above links to the web pages of the language component you are interested in.

Who can apply?

  1. The candidate must be indigenous (non-indigenous persons will not be taken into consideration, even if they have close links with indigenous communities and/or organizations).
  2. Age should not be a limitation to participation in the programme.
  3. Formal education should not be a limitation to participation in the IFP given the socio-economic barriers confronted by many indigenous peoples that limit access to formal educational institutions.
  4. Candidates should agree to train other indigenous persons after the return to their respective communities/organizations.
  5. The candidate should be proposed and his/her candidacy supported by his/her indigenous organization and/or community. It is desirable that the sponsoring organization has a firm constituency or membership and that it is representative.
  6. The candidate should have a good working knowledge of the language, in which the programme is imparted.

How to apply?

We strongly encourage you to send your application form well before the deadline.

Fellowship applications will only be taken into consideration if they are fully completed. Both parts I and II of the application form must be signed and sent by regular post at the following address:

Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Section
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
UNOG-OHCHR
CH-1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland

Scanned applications are also accepted, although we prefer receiving applications by post. Your scanned application can be sent at the following email: fellowship@ohchr.org

Application forms need to be accompanied by an official recommendation letter from the nominating indigenous organization or community.

How is the selection made?

The selection of fellows reflects a gender and regional balance, as well as a balance between communities represented. The general human rights situation in the respective regions/countries is also taken into consideration.

A pre-selection of 15 to 20 candidates per language group is made by previous indigenous fellows. The selection process also entails interviews of pre-selected candidates who applied to either the English, French, Spanish or Russian language components of the programme. In the case of the Spanish and Russian language components of the programme, the selection of candidates is also carried out in collaboration with the University of Deusto and the Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia. The final selection of successful candidates is reviewed by an advisory group composed of indigenous persons. The process starts in summer and is usually finalized by the end of the year/beginning of next. In view of the large number of applications, only pre-selected candidates are contacted. Once the process is finalized, the list of candidates selected to participate in our training programme is posted on our webpage (usually in January).

Any other question?

Any question pertaining to the Indigenous Fellowship Programme can be e-mailed to: fellowship@ohchr.org