indigeneity

CFP – Storying Solidarities: Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts, University of Calgary. Due: Feb 1, 2016

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Storying Solidarities:
Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts

A Gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association
May 28th-29th, 2016
Academic Congress, The University of Calgary, Treaty 7 Territory

In the Traditional Lands of the Blackfoot Confederacy Calgary, Alberta, Canada

For its second annual gathering, and the first time at Academic Congress, the Indigenous Literary Studies Association seeks to think together about the sometimes conflicted relationship between alliance and autonomy in decolonial struggles as imagined, illustrated, and interrogated through Indigenous literary arts. While terms like “solidarity” and “alliance” tend to be valued as inherently positive, their often vague and uncritical application risks masking and thereby sustaining settler colonial power in ways that might threaten Indigenous autonomy and self-determination.

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to explore the tensions that persist between the generative possibilities of consensual alliance and the ongoing urgency for what Métis artist and scholar David Garneau calls “irreconcilable spaces of Aboriginality”: “gatherings, ceremony, Cree-only discussions, kitchen-table conversations, email exchanges, etc. in which Blackfootness, Métisness, Indianness, Aboriginality, and/or Indigeneity is performed apart from a Settler audience” (33). In particular, we invite participants to consider the ways in which Indigenous literary arts provide tools for imagining and enacting solidarities with genuinely decolonizing potential, while laying bare the ethical dimensions such solidarities demand.

We welcome participants to consider alliance in its multiple and expansive dimensions — among Indigenous nations, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, between Indigenous scholars and the communities with which they identify, between Indigenous decolonization movements and other social justice movements, and between Indigenous literary studies and Indigenous Studies more broadly. We also welcome participants to conceive of literary arts expansively; we welcome discussions of literature, film, theatre, storytelling, song, hip-hop, and other forms of narrative expression.

Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, including at least 15 minutes for collaborative dialogue. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with any of the following topics:

  • Autonomy and Alliance in Treaty 7 Territory
  • Confederacy, Intertribal Alliance, and the Literary Arts
  • The Terrain of “Solidarity” in Community-Based Participatory Research
  • What David Garneau calls “Irreconcilable Spaces of Aboriginality”
  • What Leanne Simpson calls “Sovereign Sites of Intimacy”
  • Activist Alliances among Indigenous and Diasporic Artists
  • Kinship and Alliance with the Other-than-Human
  • Art, Autonomy, and Idlenomore
  • Literary Methods and Narrative Arts as Praxis
  • Orality and Solidarity Building
  • Collaborative Creation and Multi-Media
  • Artistic Expressions of Sovereignty and Self-Determination
  • Land-based Solidarities and the Literary Arts
  • Intimacy and Erotics as Expressions of AllianceStorying Solidarities features keynote speakers Eldon Yellowhorn (confirmed) & Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (unconfirmed). The gathering also features the Renate Eigenbrod Memorial Mentorship Lunch, which will connect emerging artists and scholars with established mentors; both mentors and mentees can register for the event by contacting Deanna Reder at dhr@sfu.ca. In collaboration with the Canadian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Languages Studies, this year’s “Aboriginal Roundtable” will bring together artists, activists, and academics who will engage the theme: “Decolonial Solidarities: Ecology, Gender, and Ethical Calls to Action.” Those interested in participating in the roundtable as featured speakers, please contact Sophie McCall at smccall@sfu.ca.Proposals for individual presentations should include the presenter’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; the presentation’s title; and a 250-word abstract that should identify the presenter’s desired format. Proposals for special sessions should include the session organizer’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; a list of confirmed participants’ names and affiliations; the session’s title; a 250-word description of the session’s goals, format, and significance, and 100-word descriptions of each participant’s contribution to the session.

    The deadline for all proposals is February 1st, 2016. All proposals should be sent to ilsaconference@gmail.com.

CFP – pdf file: CFP Storying Solidarities for ILSA 2016

Seeking book manuscripts – Critical Indigeneities book series from the University of North Carolina Press

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About Critical Indigeneities

a book series from the University of North Carolina Press

Critical Indigeneities will showcase pathbreaking scholarship that centers Indigeneity as a category of critical analysis, understands Indigenous sovereignty as ongoing and historically grounded, and attends to diverse forms of Indigenous cultural and political agency and expression. The series seeks to build on the conceptual rigor, methodological innovation, and deep relevance that characterize the best work in the growing field of critical Indigenous studies.

Critical Indigeneities will seek book manuscripts at the intersection of a broad range of disciplines and fields, including Cultural Studies, American Studies, History, Literature, Anthropology, Geography, Sociology, Environmental Studies, Political Science, Legal Studies, Performance Studies, Critical Race Studies, and Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies. The series especially seeks books that employ decolonizing methodologies and Indigenous-centered theoretical and conceptual frames. Such work may engage with critical perspectives on sovereignty struggles, Indigenous intellectual sovereignty, public history and memory studies, decolonial histories, feminist and queer interventions, visual culture and representation, globalization, Indigenous modernities, and cultural production and criticism. We particularly encourage proposals and manuscripts that are comparative or explicitly situated within a framework of global Indigeneity. This includes works that move beyond regional and nation-state frameworks, assessing the histories, political conditions, and other meaningful links pertinent to the world’s Indigenous peoples.

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SERIES EDITORS

J. Kehaulani Kauanui
J. Kehaulani Kauanui

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli) is Associate Professor of American Studies and Anthropology at Wesleyan University. She is the author of Hawaiian Blood: Colonialism and the Politics of Sovereignty and Indigeneity; her second book (in progress), Thy Kingdom Come? The Paradox of Hawaiian Sovereignty, is a critical examination of land, gender, and sexual politics in relation to nationalism. She serves on the editorial boards of Settler Colonial Studies, American Indian Quarterly, and Hūlili: Multidisciplinary Research on Hawaiian Well-Being. Kauanui is a co-founder of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA). She has a long history of working in independent community radio, including her 7-year run with the show “Indigenous Politics,” and current program, “Anarchy on Air,” for WESU-FM.
Email: jkauanui(at)wesleyan.edu

Jean M. O’Brien
Jean M. O’Brien

Jean M. O’Brien (White Earth Ojibwe) is Distinguished McKnight University Professor of History and American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota. She is the author or co-editor of books including Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England; Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States; and Why You Can’t Teach United States History without American Indians. O’Brien is co-founder and past president of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA), past president of the American Society for Ethnohistory, and inaugural co-editor (with Robert Warrior) of the journal, Native American and Indigenous Studies.
Email: obrie002(at)umn.edu

Website: http://criticalindigeneities.net/